No Fear Act 3 Scene 2
No Fear Act 3 Scene 2 Page 7

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BISHOP OF CARLISLE

My lord, wise men ne’er sit and wail their woes,
But presently prevent the ways to wail.
180To fear the foe, since fear oppresseth strength,
Gives in your weakness strength unto your foe,
And so your follies fight against yourself.
Fear and be slain; no worse can come to fight:
And fight and die is death destroying death;
185Where fearing dying pays death servile breath.

BISHOP OF CARLISLE

My lord, wise men never sit and feel sorry for themselves but try to fix the causes of their sorrow. Since fear weakens you, fearing your enemy only works against you and helps your enemy. If you’re scared, you’ll die. That’s the worst that can happen in battle. But fighting and dying is a way of beating death, because then you die nobly. But being scared and dying gives death the victory.

DUKE OF AUMERLE

My father hath a power; inquire of him
And learn to make a body of a limb.

DUKE OF AUMERLE

My father has soldiers. Let’s figure out where he is and make an army out of the men he has.

KING RICHARD II

Thou chidest me well: proud Bolingbroke, I come
To change blows with thee for our day of doom.
190This ague fit of fear is over-blown;
An easy task it is to win our own.
Say, Scroop, where lies our uncle with his power?
Speak sweetly, man, although thy looks be sour.

KING RICHARD II

Your scolding does me good. Proud Bolingbroke, I’ll exchange blows with you on our day of destiny. My fit of fear has passed. It should be easy to get our men together. Scroop, where is my uncle with his men? Tell me good news, man, even though you look bad.

SIR STEPHEN SCROOP

Men judge by the complexion of the sky
195The state and inclination of the day:
So may you by my dull and heavy eye,
My tongue hath but a heavier tale to say.
I play the torturer, by small and small
To lengthen out the worst that must be spoken:
200Your uncle York is join’d with Bolingbroke,
And all your northern castles yielded up,
And all your southern gentlemen in arms
Upon his party.

SIR STEPHEN SCROOP

Men often determine what the day is going to be like by looking at the sky, so you should know by my dull and gloomy eyes that I’m about to deliver bad news. I’m acting like a torturer, drawing out the pain of what I have to say. Your uncle York has joined forces with Bolingbroke. They have possession of all your northern castles now, and all your men of rank in the south are fighting for them, too.

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