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No Fear Act 1 Scene 3
No Fear Act 1 Scene 3 Page 2

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The trumpets sound. Enter HENRY BOLINGBROKE, appellant, in armour, with a Herald
A personal trumpet call is played. HENRY BOLINGBROKE, the accuser, enters, with a herald.

KING RICHARD II

Marshal, ask yonder knight in arms,
Both who he is and why he cometh hither
Thus plated in habiliments of war,
And formally, according to our law,
30Depose him in the justice of his cause.

KING RICHARD II

Marshal, ask that knight who he is and why he is here armed for war. Make him formally testify as to the reason he is here to fight, as our law requires.

LORD MARSHAL

What is thy name? and wherefore comest thou hither,
Before King Richard in his royal lists?
Against whom comest thou? and what’s thy quarrel?
Speak like a true knight, so defend thee heaven!

LORD MARSHAL

What is your name, and why do you come here in front of King Richard? Who is your opponent? What is your quarrel? Speak like a true knight!

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

35Harry of Hereford, Lancaster and Derby
Am I; who ready here do stand in arms,
To prove, by God’s grace and my body’s valour,
In lists, on Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk,
That he is a traitor, foul and dangerous,
40To God of heaven, King Richard and to me;
And as I truly fight, defend me heaven!

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

I am Harry of Hereford, Lancaster, and Derby. I am ready to prove with my weapons, with God’s grace, and with my strength that Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, is a foul traitor, dangerous to King Richard and to me. May heaven defend me, since I fight for truth!

LORD MARSHAL

On pain of death, no person be so bold
Or daring-hardy as to touch the lists,
Except the marshal and such officers
45Appointed to direct these fair designs.

LORD MARSHAL

Only the marshal and the appointed officials may direct the proceedings, and any other person foolish enough to enter the field will be put to death.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

Lord marshal, let me kiss my sovereign’s hand,
And bow my knee before his majesty:
For Mowbray and myself are like two men
That vow a long and weary pilgrimage;
50Then let us take a ceremonious leave
And loving farewell of our several friends.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

Lord marshal, let me kiss the king’s hand and go on my knee before him. Mowbray and I are about to undertake a challenge similar to a long and difficult journey, so we should say a formal goodbye to our friends.

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