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  Act 1 Scene 3

page Act 1 Scene 3 Page 9

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THOMAS MOWBRAY

No, Bolingbroke: if ever I were traitor,
My name be blotted from the book of life,
And I from heaven banish’d as from hence!
But what thou art, God, thou, and I do know;
205And all too soon, I fear, the king shall rue.
Farewell, my liege. Now no way can I stray;
Save back to England, all the world’s my way.

THOMAS MOWBRAY

No, Bolingbroke. If I were ever a traitor, may I die and be forbidden from heaven! But you and I and God all know what you are, and I fear that the king will find out all too soon—to his sorrow. Goodbye, my lord. Now I’m unable to lose my way, since my way is anywhere in the world other than England.
Exit
He exits.

KING RICHARD II

Uncle, even in the glasses of thine eyes
I see thy grieved heart: thy sad aspect
210Hath from the number of his banish’d years
Pluck’d four away.

KING RICHARD II

Uncle, I can see in your eyes how much you are grieving. Since you are so sad, I’ll reduce your son’s exile by four years.
To HENRY BOLINGBROKE
To HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Six frozen winter spent,
Return with welcome home from banishment.
After six years, you will be welcome to come home.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

How long a time lies in one little word!
215Four lagging winters and four wanton springs
End in a word: such is the breath of kings.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

How much time is kept in a word! Four slow winters and four lush springs taken away in a word. That’s the power of a king.

JOHN OF GAUNT

I thank my liege, that in regard of me
He shortens four years of my son’s exile:
But little vantage shall I reap thereby;
220For, ere the six years that he hath to spend
Can change their moons and bring their times about
My oil-dried lamp and time-bewasted light
Shall be extinct with age and endless night;
My inch of taper will be burnt and done,
225And blindfold death not let me see my son.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Thank you, my lord, for shortening my son’s exile for my sake. But I won’t gain much by it. By the time six years have passed I will be dead and won’t be able to see my son.

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