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  Act 1 Scene 3

page Act 1 Scene 3 Page 11

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Flourish. Exeunt KING RICHARD II and train
Trumpets blow. KING RICHARD II and his assistants exit.

DUKE OF AUMERLE

250Cousin, farewell: what presence must not know,
From where you do remain let paper show.

DUKE OF AUMERLE

Cousin, goodbye. Send me a letter telling me where you are, since I won’t be able to hear it from you in person.

LORD MARSHAL

My lord, no leave take I; for I will ride,
As far as land will let me, by your side.

LORD MARSHAL

My lord, I won’t say goodbye. I’ll ride with you as far as I can.

JOHN OF GAUNT

O, to what purpose dost thou hoard thy words,
255That thou return’st no greeting to thy friends?

JOHN OF GAUNT

Why are you remaining silent? Won’t you say goodbye to your friends?

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

I have too few to take my leave of you,
When the tongue’s office should be prodigal
To breathe the abundant dolour of the heart.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

I should be able to tell you in several ways how sad I feel, but I have no words to express how sad I feel in saying goodbye to you.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Thy grief is but thy absence for a time.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Your grief is just that you’ll be absent for a time.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

260Joy absent, grief is present for that time.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

With joy gone, grief will take up that whole time.

JOHN OF GAUNT

What is six winters? they are quickly gone.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Six years will go by quickly.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

To men in joy; but grief makes one hour ten.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

To a happy man they would pass quickly, but with sorrow one hour feels like ten.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Call it a travel that thou takest for pleasure.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Think of it as a pleasure trip.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

My heart will sigh when I miscall it so,
265Which finds it an inforced pilgrimage.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

To pretend it is a vacation will only make it worse.

JOHN OF GAUNT

The sullen passage of thy weary steps
Esteem as foil wherein thou art to set
The precious jewel of thy home return.

JOHN OF GAUNT

Think of these sorrowful years as a way to make your return home even happier.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

Nay, rather, every tedious stride I make
270Will but remember me what a deal of world
I wander from the jewels that I love.
Must I not serve a long apprenticehood
To foreign passages, and in the end,
Having my freedom, boast of nothing else
275But that I was a journeyman to grief?

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

No, every step I take away will only remind me how far I am from what I love. I’ll be serving so many long years in a foreign land, and, other than my freedom, I’ll have nothing to show for it at the end.

Richard II: Popular pages