Artboard Created with Sketch. Close Search Dialog
! Error Created with Sketch.

  Act 2 Scene 3

page Act 2 Scene 3 Page 3

Original Text

Modern Text

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

I thank thee, gentle Percy; and be sure
I count myself in nothing else so happy
As in a soul remembering my good friends;
And, as my fortune ripens with thy love,
50It shall be still thy true love’s recompense:
My heart this covenant makes, my hand thus seals it.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

Thank you, kind Percy. I count myself happiest when remembering my good friends. I know that the reward for your love will be to witness how it helps me find greater success. My heart makes this promise to you, and this handshake seals that promise.

NORTHUMBERLAND

How far is it to Berkeley? and what stir
Keeps good old York there with his men of war?

NORTHUMBERLAND

How far is it to Berkeley? And what events keep good old York there with his soldiers?

HENRY PERCY

There stands the castle, by yon tuft of trees,
55Mann’d with three hundred men, as I have heard;
And in it are the Lords of York, Berkeley, and Seymour;
None else of name and noble estimate.

HENRY PERCY

There’s the castle, over by that group of trees. I’ve heard that it’s protected by three hundred men, and that the Lord of York, the Lord of Berkeley, and the Lord of Seymour are there. There’s no one else of title and noble reputation inside.
Enter LORD ROSS and LORD WILLOUGHBY
LORD ROSS and LORD WILLOUGHBY enter.

NORTHUMBERLAND

Here come the Lords of Ross and Willoughby,
Bloody with spurring, fiery-red with haste.

NORTHUMBERLAND

Here come the Lord of Ross and the Lord of Willoughby. They are bloody from sticking their spurs so hard into their horses, and their faces are red from riding here so fast.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

60Welcome, my lords. I wot your love pursues
A banish’d traitor: all my treasury
Is yet but unfelt thanks, which more enrich’d
Shall be your love and labour’s recompense.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

Welcome, my lords. I know that you’ve followed me here out of love for me. Right now I can only pay you with my thanks, but once I have money I’ll repay your love and hard work.

LORD ROSS

Your presence makes us rich, most noble lord.

LORD ROSS

We are rich enough from just being here with you here, most noble lord.

LORD WILLOUGHBY

65And far surmounts our labour to attain it.

LORD WILLOUGHBY

And that richness is much more than anything we could earn by working.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

Evermore thanks, the exchequer of the poor;
Which, till my infant fortune comes to years,
Stands for my bounty. But who comes here?

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

The poor earn their wealth in the form of gratitude. Until my young fortune matures, that gratitude will have to take the place of riches. But who’s coming now?

Richard II: Popular pages