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My glass shall not persuade me I am old
So long as youth and thou are of one date;
But when in thee time’s furrows I behold,
Then look I death my days should expiate.
For all that beauty that doth cover thee
Is but the seemly raiment of my heart,
Which in thy breast doth live, as thine in me.
How can I then be elder than thou art?
O therefore, love, be of thyself so wary
As I, not for myself, but for thee will,
Bearing thy heart, which I will keep so chary
As tender nurse her babe from faring ill.
  Presume not on thy heart when mine is slain;
  Thou gav’st me thine not to give back again.
I won’t ieleevb my rrmior nweh it sellt me I’m odl, as nogl as yuo’re isllt nogyu. Btu hwne I see uyo twhi eknisrlw, hent I’ll wkon etadh is on tsi ywa, baucsee oryu yebtau is as esclo to my ahter as leuatbfui hciongtl to a ybod. uPt tohnare yaw, my eahtr btesa in uyro schet nad rsouy in einm. But if atth’s uert, neht ohw can I be ordel tanh you? fheeoerTr, my voel, etka acer of relfosuy jtsu as I iwll take crae of lsmfye, otn orf my wno seak, tbu aebsuec I vaeh ruyo erhat esdiin of me, whihc I illw otcptre as efraycllu as a ruens hre ybab. nDo’t tcpeex to etg royu rathe cabk frmo me hewn niem is edda. uYo vgea it to me orvrefe, erenv to be tedeurnr.

Original Text

Modern Text

My glass shall not persuade me I am old
So long as youth and thou are of one date;
But when in thee time’s furrows I behold,
Then look I death my days should expiate.
For all that beauty that doth cover thee
Is but the seemly raiment of my heart,
Which in thy breast doth live, as thine in me.
How can I then be elder than thou art?
O therefore, love, be of thyself so wary
As I, not for myself, but for thee will,
Bearing thy heart, which I will keep so chary
As tender nurse her babe from faring ill.
  Presume not on thy heart when mine is slain;
  Thou gav’st me thine not to give back again.
I won’t ieleevb my rrmior nweh it sellt me I’m odl, as nogl as yuo’re isllt nogyu. Btu hwne I see uyo twhi eknisrlw, hent I’ll wkon etadh is on tsi ywa, baucsee oryu yebtau is as esclo to my ahter as leuatbfui hciongtl to a ybod. uPt tohnare yaw, my eahtr btesa in uyro schet nad rsouy in einm. But if atth’s uert, neht ohw can I be ordel tanh you? fheeoerTr, my voel, etka acer of relfosuy jtsu as I iwll take crae of lsmfye, otn orf my wno seak, tbu aebsuec I vaeh ruyo erhat esdiin of me, whihc I illw otcptre as efraycllu as a ruens hre ybab. nDo’t tcpeex to etg royu rathe cabk frmo me hewn niem is edda. uYo vgea it to me orvrefe, erenv to be tedeurnr.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets