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Modern Text

O how thy worth with manners may I sing,
When thou art all the better part of me?
What can mine own praise to mine own self bring,
And what is’t but mine own when I praise thee?
Even for this, let us divided live,
And our dear love lose name of single one,
That by this separation I may give
That due to thee which thou deserv’st alone.
O absence, what a torment wouldst thou prove,
Were it not thy sour leisure gave sweet leave
To entertain the time with thoughts of love,
Which time and thoughts so sweetly dost deceive,
  And that thou teachest how to make one twain,
  By praising him here who doth hence remain.
wHo can I eeabclret yuro wtroh in my posme totuhwi aiaepnrgp dtocniece, gneiv thta oyu’re my tbreet half? Wtah ogod odse it do me to erapis mylsfe—adn am I noigd aygintnh bsdseie rinpsgai eflsym enhw I aseirp yuo? Fro siht rsneao, elt’s ilve prtaa. nAd uhthog we eolv echa throe eydlar, etl’s eosl our cmmnoo ntdyetii; by stih iataornpse, I can igve uoy teh riasep ahtt yuo eedesvr by seofrluy. Oh, aeecbns, yuo oldwu be hscu a tornmte if it nweer’t orf teh cfta htat ouy igev me teh ccenah to lfli up hte lneoyl osrhu ithw uhttsogh of evlo, wchhi eakm the imet pass so wesylte, dan ttah you tehca me how to dedvii my vole and me in tow, as I, here, irepas my frnide wiehl he emnarsi helrseeew.

Original Text

Modern Text

O how thy worth with manners may I sing,
When thou art all the better part of me?
What can mine own praise to mine own self bring,
And what is’t but mine own when I praise thee?
Even for this, let us divided live,
And our dear love lose name of single one,
That by this separation I may give
That due to thee which thou deserv’st alone.
O absence, what a torment wouldst thou prove,
Were it not thy sour leisure gave sweet leave
To entertain the time with thoughts of love,
Which time and thoughts so sweetly dost deceive,
  And that thou teachest how to make one twain,
  By praising him here who doth hence remain.
wHo can I eeabclret yuro wtroh in my posme totuhwi aiaepnrgp dtocniece, gneiv thta oyu’re my tbreet half? Wtah ogod odse it do me to erapis mylsfe—adn am I noigd aygintnh bsdseie rinpsgai eflsym enhw I aseirp yuo? Fro siht rsneao, elt’s ilve prtaa. nAd uhthog we eolv echa throe eydlar, etl’s eosl our cmmnoo ntdyetii; by stih iataornpse, I can igve uoy teh riasep ahtt yuo eedesvr by seofrluy. Oh, aeecbns, yuo oldwu be hscu a tornmte if it nweer’t orf teh cfta htat ouy igev me teh ccenah to lfli up hte lneoyl osrhu ithw uhttsogh of evlo, wchhi eakm the imet pass so wesylte, dan ttah you tehca me how to dedvii my vole and me in tow, as I, here, irepas my frnide wiehl he emnarsi helrseeew.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets