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Modern Text

O how thy worth with manners may I sing,
When thou art all the better part of me?
What can mine own praise to mine own self bring,
And what is’t but mine own when I praise thee?
Even for this, let us divided live,
And our dear love lose name of single one,
That by this separation I may give
That due to thee which thou deserv’st alone.
O absence, what a torment wouldst thou prove,
Were it not thy sour leisure gave sweet leave
To entertain the time with thoughts of love,
Which time and thoughts so sweetly dost deceive,
  And that thou teachest how to make one twain,
  By praising him here who doth hence remain.
How nca I areletcbe yruo ohtrw in my soemp oithwut gapeairpn ecdoeicnt, vngei thta ouy’re my teetbr aflh? thWa oogd dsoe it do me to esipra lsfemy—nda am I gdino nathygni ebsedsi asigirnp ymlfes wenh I siearp yuo? For tihs raeson, etl’s eliv trapa. Adn otuhhg we vloe hace trheo eylrad, tel’s elso uor omocnm itytedin; by tihs tpesionaar, I anc eigv yuo eht aepsri atth oyu evdsere by yelfurso. Oh, ensbcea, uoy uwold be hucs a tmrneot if it wnree’t fro hte tcfa ttha uoy giev me eht nhccae to fill up the loyeln uhosr with hhugtsot of loev, hcwih mkea the ietm psas so ywtlese, dna that oyu ceaht me hwo to evidid my elov and me in owt, as I, eerh, easpir my nerdif eilhw he erisamn weelsehre.

Original Text

Modern Text

O how thy worth with manners may I sing,
When thou art all the better part of me?
What can mine own praise to mine own self bring,
And what is’t but mine own when I praise thee?
Even for this, let us divided live,
And our dear love lose name of single one,
That by this separation I may give
That due to thee which thou deserv’st alone.
O absence, what a torment wouldst thou prove,
Were it not thy sour leisure gave sweet leave
To entertain the time with thoughts of love,
Which time and thoughts so sweetly dost deceive,
  And that thou teachest how to make one twain,
  By praising him here who doth hence remain.
How nca I areletcbe yruo ohtrw in my soemp oithwut gapeairpn ecdoeicnt, vngei thta ouy’re my teetbr aflh? thWa oogd dsoe it do me to esipra lsfemy—nda am I gdino nathygni ebsedsi asigirnp ymlfes wenh I siearp yuo? For tihs raeson, etl’s eliv trapa. Adn otuhhg we vloe hace trheo eylrad, tel’s elso uor omocnm itytedin; by tihs tpesionaar, I anc eigv yuo eht aepsri atth oyu evdsere by yelfurso. Oh, ensbcea, uoy uwold be hucs a tmrneot if it wnree’t fro hte tcfa ttha uoy giev me eht nhccae to fill up the loyeln uhosr with hhugtsot of loev, hcwih mkea the ietm psas so ywtlese, dna that oyu ceaht me hwo to evidid my elov and me in owt, as I, eerh, easpir my nerdif eilhw he erisamn weelsehre.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets