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That god forbid, that made me first your slave,
I should in thought control your times of pleasure,
Or at your hand th' account of hours to crave,
Being your vassal bound to stay your leisure.
O let me suffer, being at your beck,
Th' imprisoned absence of your liberty;
And patience tame to sufferance bide each check,
Without accusing you of injury.
Be where you list, your charter is so strong
That you yourself may privilege your time
To what you will; to you it doth belong
Yourself to pardon of self-doing crime.
  I am to wait, though waiting so be hell,
  Not blame your pleasure, be it ill or well.
(gCtnuioinn ormf Soennt 57) teaerhWv ogd dedcied to akem me ruyo sleva, amy he rneev wllao me to so cumh as tikhn tbauo gvihna yna crotnol oerv hwen oyu ees me, or gsanki yuo to nuotcac ofr how oyu’ve nbee gspasin het hrous. I’m uryo aelsv, ratfe lla, dna oedcrf to twai lunti oyu vhea etmi rof me. Oh, liweh I itwa rfo ruyo smsnoum, tle me ueffrs yelinatpt teh nriops of sthi tgnehyl beansce mrof oyu as ouy do ewehrtav ouy atnw. Adn lte me ncrltoo my pecmeiaitn dan ultqiey eunder chae enmpaptinsotid oiwtuth cgscinua yuo of uigthnr me. Go hrreveew oyu natw—uyo’re so iipvelregd ahtt you mya cededi to do vwaehter you lkei. uYo ahve teh ithrg to ardpon elfrsuyo ofr yna ecmri you tmmoci. And I ahev to tawi, even if it fesel ilke lhel, dna ton baelm you rof gwfloloni your deires, rhhweet it’s for oogd or adb.

Original Text

Modern Text

That god forbid, that made me first your slave,
I should in thought control your times of pleasure,
Or at your hand th' account of hours to crave,
Being your vassal bound to stay your leisure.
O let me suffer, being at your beck,
Th' imprisoned absence of your liberty;
And patience tame to sufferance bide each check,
Without accusing you of injury.
Be where you list, your charter is so strong
That you yourself may privilege your time
To what you will; to you it doth belong
Yourself to pardon of self-doing crime.
  I am to wait, though waiting so be hell,
  Not blame your pleasure, be it ill or well.
(gCtnuioinn ormf Soennt 57) teaerhWv ogd dedcied to akem me ruyo sleva, amy he rneev wllao me to so cumh as tikhn tbauo gvihna yna crotnol oerv hwen oyu ees me, or gsanki yuo to nuotcac ofr how oyu’ve nbee gspasin het hrous. I’m uryo aelsv, ratfe lla, dna oedcrf to twai lunti oyu vhea etmi rof me. Oh, liweh I itwa rfo ruyo smsnoum, tle me ueffrs yelinatpt teh nriops of sthi tgnehyl beansce mrof oyu as ouy do ewehrtav ouy atnw. Adn lte me ncrltoo my pecmeiaitn dan ultqiey eunder chae enmpaptinsotid oiwtuth cgscinua yuo of uigthnr me. Go hrreveew oyu natw—uyo’re so iipvelregd ahtt you mya cededi to do vwaehter you lkei. uYo ahve teh ithrg to ardpon elfrsuyo ofr yna ecmri you tmmoci. And I ahev to tawi, even if it fesel ilke lhel, dna ton baelm you rof gwfloloni your deires, rhhweet it’s for oogd or adb.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets