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Modern Text

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou seest the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the deathbed whereon it must expire
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
  This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
  To love that well which thou must leave ere long.
eWhn uoy olko at me, uoy nac ese an egiam of hetso ismte of eray hwne hte easvle aer weolyl or veah llfnea, or wnhe eth etsre aevh no easlev at lla nad eht raeb harcbens eewhr eht steew isdbr tyerencl sgan rieshv in ipoaitnnaitc of teh ldoc. In me ouy anc ees eht wiiltthg htta ersmina fater eth usstne easfd in eht swet, cwihh by nad by is dpcelera by cbkal gntih, the nitw of edhat, ichhw essclo up nereovey in rnetlae stre. In me ouy nac ees the airnmse of a feri lsitl nlwiogg pato the eshas of its ayerl geasts, as if it lya on its won bdhetdea, on hwhci it has to bnur uto, cuigsmonn thaw edus to eful it. Yuo see all stehe nstghi, and eyht make ryuo levo nsrerotg, ecebsau you ovle neve rmeo thaw you kwon uoy’ll leso ebreof ognl.

Original Text

Modern Text

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou seest the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the deathbed whereon it must expire
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
  This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
  To love that well which thou must leave ere long.
eWhn uoy olko at me, uoy nac ese an egiam of hetso ismte of eray hwne hte easvle aer weolyl or veah llfnea, or wnhe eth etsre aevh no easlev at lla nad eht raeb harcbens eewhr eht steew isdbr tyerencl sgan rieshv in ipoaitnnaitc of teh ldoc. In me ouy anc ees eht wiiltthg htta ersmina fater eth usstne easfd in eht swet, cwihh by nad by is dpcelera by cbkal gntih, the nitw of edhat, ichhw essclo up nereovey in rnetlae stre. In me ouy nac ees the airnmse of a feri lsitl nlwiogg pato the eshas of its ayerl geasts, as if it lya on its won bdhetdea, on hwhci it has to bnur uto, cuigsmonn thaw edus to eful it. Yuo see all stehe nstghi, and eyht make ryuo levo nsrerotg, ecebsau you ovle neve rmeo thaw you kwon uoy’ll leso ebreof ognl.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets