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When thou shalt be disposed to set me light
And place my merit in the eye of scorn,
Upon thy side against myself I’ll fight,
And prove thee virtuous, though thou art forsworn.
With mine own weakness being best acquainted,
Upon thy part I can set down a story
Of faults concealed, wherein I am attainted,
That thou in losing me shalt win much glory.
And I by this will be a gainer too,
For bending all my loving thoughts on thee,
The injuries that to myself I do,
Doing thee vantage, double vantage me.
  Such is my love, to thee I so belong,
  That for thy right myself will bear all wrong.
ehWn oyu elef cnidinle to tknhi itllte of me nda kmae tehro epoelp csnro me, I’ll ktae rouy edsi nad ugera tnaaisg emfyls, ntniodtgeamsr atth uoy’re uvtousir vnee hlwie uoy’re lyign butoa me. ineSc I wkno my won saneeekwss eebtrt hant aonyen, I cna tlle a oytsr botau my ehndid salfut (in hciwh I lereva emylfs as ormyall tadietn) that wlil hvae peolpe hnigtnki trbete of uyo ofr tno ebing iwht me nrymaeo. dAn I, oot, liwl aing by niugntr all my nolvgi ohtuhstg to ouy: ehrvetWa iijsneru I do to fyemls lilw ephl uoy, hwihc lilw leph me dyblou. I olev ouy so cuhm—enlogb to you so tayltlo—taht to teg you egtyvrienh ouy’re tetdeinl to, I will keta eyrev grwon opnu yesflm.

Original Text

Modern Text

When thou shalt be disposed to set me light
And place my merit in the eye of scorn,
Upon thy side against myself I’ll fight,
And prove thee virtuous, though thou art forsworn.
With mine own weakness being best acquainted,
Upon thy part I can set down a story
Of faults concealed, wherein I am attainted,
That thou in losing me shalt win much glory.
And I by this will be a gainer too,
For bending all my loving thoughts on thee,
The injuries that to myself I do,
Doing thee vantage, double vantage me.
  Such is my love, to thee I so belong,
  That for thy right myself will bear all wrong.
ehWn oyu elef cnidinle to tknhi itllte of me nda kmae tehro epoelp csnro me, I’ll ktae rouy edsi nad ugera tnaaisg emfyls, ntniodtgeamsr atth uoy’re uvtousir vnee hlwie uoy’re lyign butoa me. ineSc I wkno my won saneeekwss eebtrt hant aonyen, I cna tlle a oytsr botau my ehndid salfut (in hciwh I lereva emylfs as ormyall tadietn) that wlil hvae peolpe hnigtnki trbete of uyo ofr tno ebing iwht me nrymaeo. dAn I, oot, liwl aing by niugntr all my nolvgi ohtuhstg to ouy: ehrvetWa iijsneru I do to fyemls lilw ephl uoy, hwihc lilw leph me dyblou. I olev ouy so cuhm—enlogb to you so tayltlo—taht to teg you egtyvrienh ouy’re tetdeinl to, I will keta eyrev grwon opnu yesflm.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets