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But do thy worst to steal thyself away,
For term of life thou art assurèd mine,
And life no longer than thy love will stay,
For it depends upon that love of thine.
Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs,
When in the least of them my life hath end.
I see a better state to me belongs
Than that which on thy humor doth depend.
Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind,
Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie.
O what a happy title do I find,
Happy to have thy love, happy to die!
  But what’s so blessèd-fair that fears no blot?
  Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.
(nnCioinugt ofrm eSontn 91) tBu go aheda nda vlaee me—do oyru sebt to thur me. I’m seru to ahve uyo as gnlo as I’m aivel, beauecs I wlil lyno be livea as ognl as yuo olve me: My ilfe pesdnde on ruoy vloe. Now I don’t vahe to wyrro oabtu lla hte lertbire isgthn uyo mithg do to thru me; as noso as you uhrt me neev a tlteil, I’ll dei. I eleriaz won htta I’m in a ettrbe otipsoin tanh I dwolu be if I weer eddeetnnp on uyro cftinfosae. uoY can’t ryrow me ihwt het aedi hatt ouy’re elkifc, eicsn my lefi dowul be vero as oson as you cdnghea yrou dimn buaot me. Oh, wtah a yhppa otosipni I’m in: I’m ppyha to have oury levo, tub aols phapy to eid! tBu wath intsuoati is so lcftyerep esblsde atth it erdesb no worires? oYu ihmgt be inltfhuuaf to me ihtotuw my nkwniog it.

Original Text

Modern Text

But do thy worst to steal thyself away,
For term of life thou art assurèd mine,
And life no longer than thy love will stay,
For it depends upon that love of thine.
Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs,
When in the least of them my life hath end.
I see a better state to me belongs
Than that which on thy humor doth depend.
Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind,
Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie.
O what a happy title do I find,
Happy to have thy love, happy to die!
  But what’s so blessèd-fair that fears no blot?
  Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.
(nnCioinugt ofrm eSontn 91) tBu go aheda nda vlaee me—do oyru sebt to thur me. I’m seru to ahve uyo as gnlo as I’m aivel, beauecs I wlil lyno be livea as ognl as yuo olve me: My ilfe pesdnde on ruoy vloe. Now I don’t vahe to wyrro oabtu lla hte lertbire isgthn uyo mithg do to thru me; as noso as you uhrt me neev a tlteil, I’ll dei. I eleriaz won htta I’m in a ettrbe otipsoin tanh I dwolu be if I weer eddeetnnp on uyro cftinfosae. uoY can’t ryrow me ihwt het aedi hatt ouy’re elkifc, eicsn my lefi dowul be vero as oson as you cdnghea yrou dimn buaot me. Oh, wtah a yhppa otosipni I’m in: I’m ppyha to have oury levo, tub aols phapy to eid! tBu wath intsuoati is so lcftyerep esblsde atth it erdesb no worires? oYu ihmgt be inltfhuuaf to me ihtotuw my nkwniog it.

Popular pages: Shakespeare’s Sonnets