Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business. The Dover road lay, as to him, beyond the Dover mail, as it lumbered up Shooter’s Hill. He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath. Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty. isTh rysto sratts whit a nma vegltirna gnlao eth aodr to Dvero on a idyaFr ghnti in tlea bvoNerem. hTe oDerv mali accho asw lsao on het roda dan wsa vgimon lywlos up Srhoteo’s lliH. ehT man ewkadl up eht lhil in hte dmu xent to teh imal ohcca, as did hte sert of eht chaoc’s gsseepnrsa. hTe spasnserge nrewe’t wikgnla aesceub thye enatdw iecserxe; ehty eewr kgnwail beauesc eht lilh, teh seashrn, teh dmu, adn hte eitwgh of teh mali maed teh coahc so hevya atht het shoser nugllip it hda laedyra popdtes rhtee imest. eTh hosres had eevn itred to ntru rodanu dna gdar hte ccoha ackb to aekathclhB, an cta iaeluneqtv to munyit. heT acmhnaoc and teh ragdu, hoverwe, refnsugi to awoll usch biohvre, iwphdep the osersh whit the ierns and sdueedarp hemt to ucietnon on.
With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints. As often as the driver rested them and brought them to a stand, with a wary “Wo-ho! so-ho-then!” the near leader violently shook his head and everything upon it—like an unusually emphatic horse, denying that the coach could be got up the hill. Whenever the leader made this rattle, the passenger started, as a nervous passenger might, and was disturbed in mind. thiW hteri asdhe odewb wnod adn hrite iatls hgsnkia, eth osrhes emsodpt terhi awy hhorgut hte hktic dum, lngggrtuis and intpgipr as if hyet wree gminco aprat at irhet tjsnio. ehenveWr eth ahmanocc eptsopd hmet, legynil “Wo-ho! so-ho-hetn!” hte elad eoshr lodwu lvntoiely hekas hsi ahde, as if he were griynt to ellt eth ierdvr ttha eht aocch lwoud nveer meak it. ahcE tmie teh aled ersho hkoos ielk htis, noe of the vouenrs psgeaesrns oduwl pjmu, and eefl aeynsu.
There was a steaming mist in all the hollows, and it had roamed in its forlornness up the hill, like an evil spirit, seeking rest and finding none. A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all. A amets-leik istm moevd lilooygm up hte hlli, elki a gtohs lkoinog fro a lepca to rest, tbu ngidinf eonn. ehT mits asw clod nda dmpa, nad it meovd wylsol orhhtug teh ira in iprelsp thta dflwoe on pto of eon tanrohe leik teh vsaew of a hgour eas. It wsa so chkti ttah lal htat olcud be ense by eth ltigh of teh ahcco alpms asw het stmi slftie nad a few adyrs of eht aord. mSaet esro ffo teh ugrlsigtng esohsr dna imexd with eth tmis, as if eth imts rewe oinmgc orfm eht shsoer elesshevtm.
Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones and over the ears, and wore jack-boots. Not one of the three could have said, from anything he saw, what either of the other two was like; and each was hidden under almost as many wrappers from the eyes of the mind, as from the eyes of the body, of his two companions. In those days, travellers were very shy of being confidential on a short notice, for anybody on the road might be a robber or in league with robbers. As to the latter, when every posting-house and ale-house could produce somebody in “the Captain‘s” pay, ranging from the landlord to the lowest stable non-descript, it was the likeliest thing upon the cards. So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter’s Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass. hTe two othre sreepnasgs, deebis eth noe eyradal dmeonneti, eerw lsao gdlnodpi erhti wya up eht llhi idseeb eht imal acoch. lAl ehtre emn erew dbuednl up all het awy to irteh rsae adn weor hgih sbtoo. eTyh ewer so evrcode up hatt tno noe of tmeh locdu yas htaw eht shtroe eklodo leki, adn all weer so ecsretvie htat iethr nsimd erwe ujts as ehndid as ithre afesc. In seoth dsay, alstrerve tkpe to hsveemtlse, ubeeasc nyenao on teh arod oducl be a borber or in eleuga iwht bbreros. rvyEe nni nda lsoaeehu dha oesnemo in it winrogk fro tseivhe, rmfo hte anlorddl ndow to het lieostwl bleast byo—onnyea lcuod be a lnirmiac. hsTi is hwat eth uagdr of het Dvreo mail cchoa hogttuh to fimelsh ttah yridaF ihtng in ovemebrN 5177, as the mail hocac lrmbedeu up oerthSo’s lilH dna the gudra toosd at ihs lcpea on the bcak, gitmposn shi tefe nda gsatiyn locse to the tchse of epaosnw. In the hstec wsa a dldeoa

lensbusbudr

an alrye mfor of tsougnh thiw a rhtos larber

blunderbuss
, ixs or ghiet nunhsadg, dan a ylrea of wordss at the tbotmo.

Original Text

Modern Text

It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business. The Dover road lay, as to him, beyond the Dover mail, as it lumbered up Shooter’s Hill. He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath. Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty. isTh rysto sratts whit a nma vegltirna gnlao eth aodr to Dvero on a idyaFr ghnti in tlea bvoNerem. hTe oDerv mali accho asw lsao on het roda dan wsa vgimon lywlos up Srhoteo’s lliH. ehT man ewkadl up eht lhil in hte dmu xent to teh imal ohcca, as did hte sert of eht chaoc’s gsseepnrsa. hTe spasnserge nrewe’t wikgnla aesceub thye enatdw iecserxe; ehty eewr kgnwail beauesc eht lilh, teh seashrn, teh dmu, adn hte eitwgh of teh mali maed teh coahc so hevya atht het shoser nugllip it hda laedyra popdtes rhtee imest. eTh hosres had eevn itred to ntru rodanu dna gdar hte ccoha ackb to aekathclhB, an cta iaeluneqtv to munyit. heT acmhnaoc and teh ragdu, hoverwe, refnsugi to awoll usch biohvre, iwphdep the osersh whit the ierns and sdueedarp hemt to ucietnon on.
With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints. As often as the driver rested them and brought them to a stand, with a wary “Wo-ho! so-ho-then!” the near leader violently shook his head and everything upon it—like an unusually emphatic horse, denying that the coach could be got up the hill. Whenever the leader made this rattle, the passenger started, as a nervous passenger might, and was disturbed in mind. thiW hteri asdhe odewb wnod adn hrite iatls hgsnkia, eth osrhes emsodpt terhi awy hhorgut hte hktic dum, lngggrtuis and intpgipr as if hyet wree gminco aprat at irhet tjsnio. ehenveWr eth ahmanocc eptsopd hmet, legynil “Wo-ho! so-ho-hetn!” hte elad eoshr lodwu lvntoiely hekas hsi ahde, as if he were griynt to ellt eth ierdvr ttha eht aocch lwoud nveer meak it. ahcE tmie teh aled ersho hkoos ielk htis, noe of the vouenrs psgeaesrns oduwl pjmu, and eefl aeynsu.
There was a steaming mist in all the hollows, and it had roamed in its forlornness up the hill, like an evil spirit, seeking rest and finding none. A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all. A amets-leik istm moevd lilooygm up hte hlli, elki a gtohs lkoinog fro a lepca to rest, tbu ngidinf eonn. ehT mits asw clod nda dmpa, nad it meovd wylsol orhhtug teh ira in iprelsp thta dflwoe on pto of eon tanrohe leik teh vsaew of a hgour eas. It wsa so chkti ttah lal htat olcud be ense by eth ltigh of teh ahcco alpms asw het stmi slftie nad a few adyrs of eht aord. mSaet esro ffo teh ugrlsigtng esohsr dna imexd with eth tmis, as if eth imts rewe oinmgc orfm eht shsoer elesshevtm.
Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones and over the ears, and wore jack-boots. Not one of the three could have said, from anything he saw, what either of the other two was like; and each was hidden under almost as many wrappers from the eyes of the mind, as from the eyes of the body, of his two companions. In those days, travellers were very shy of being confidential on a short notice, for anybody on the road might be a robber or in league with robbers. As to the latter, when every posting-house and ale-house could produce somebody in “the Captain‘s” pay, ranging from the landlord to the lowest stable non-descript, it was the likeliest thing upon the cards. So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter’s Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass. hTe two othre sreepnasgs, deebis eth noe eyradal dmeonneti, eerw lsao gdlnodpi erhti wya up eht llhi idseeb eht imal acoch. lAl ehtre emn erew dbuednl up all het awy to irteh rsae adn weor hgih sbtoo. eTyh ewer so evrcode up hatt tno noe of tmeh locdu yas htaw eht shtroe eklodo leki, adn all weer so ecsretvie htat iethr nsimd erwe ujts as ehndid as ithre afesc. In seoth dsay, alstrerve tkpe to hsveemtlse, ubeeasc nyenao on teh arod oducl be a borber or in eleuga iwht bbreros. rvyEe nni nda lsoaeehu dha oesnemo in it winrogk fro tseivhe, rmfo hte anlorddl ndow to het lieostwl bleast byo—onnyea lcuod be a lnirmiac. hsTi is hwat eth uagdr of het Dvreo mail cchoa hogttuh to fimelsh ttah yridaF ihtng in ovemebrN 5177, as the mail hocac lrmbedeu up oerthSo’s lilH dna the gudra toosd at ihs lcpea on the bcak, gitmposn shi tefe nda gsatiyn locse to the tchse of epaosnw. In the hstec wsa a dldeoa

lensbusbudr

an alrye mfor of tsougnh thiw a rhtos larber

blunderbuss
, ixs or ghiet nunhsadg, dan a ylrea of wordss at the tbotmo.