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It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business. The Dover road lay, as to him, beyond the Dover mail, as it lumbered up Shooter’s Hill. He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath. Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty. siTh ytsro tstsar tiwh a amn itvgrenla aonlg teh rdao to Doerv on a ardFiy hntig in tlae eerNmobv. Teh roveD alim oacch asw sola on het roda nda wsa mgvnoi llwyso up Srehtoo’s lHli. hTe man kewlad up het lilh in eht udm exnt to eth ialm hacoc, as idd teh tres of hte ohacc’s esgpsrsaen. The ersspsaeng newre’t lniwgka ecebaus eyht dtwena ierecsxe; ethy erew klaignw eusabce eht lhli, teh anserhs, eth dmu, nda eht tegwih of eht ailm adme eth cahco so vaehy hatt teh sshore ilnlgpu it adh laadyer eopsdtp eethr itmes. The sseohr dha vene tedri to rntu nodrau adn grda teh occha bkac to lheatkcahB, an tac elanetquiv to iytnmu. The ocahcmna dna eth arugd, roewvhe, iefgsrun to llowa ucsh hieorbv, pwdehip het heosrs iwht the iensr dna adreesudp meth to ucieotnn on.
With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints. As often as the driver rested them and brought them to a stand, with a wary “Wo-ho! so-ho-then!” the near leader violently shook his head and everything upon it—like an unusually emphatic horse, denying that the coach could be got up the hill. Whenever the leader made this rattle, the passenger started, as a nervous passenger might, and was disturbed in mind. hiWt ihetr eadsh eobdw nwod dna ehitr lasti ikhsgna, hte eshsro opmsdte hrtei ayw ruthhog het ihckt udm, isntrgulgg nad rnitigpp as if hyet rwee mncogi parat at trihe otjnis. ehnrWeev eht nchaoacm otspdep hetm, ylneigl “Wo-ho! so-ho-nhet!” eht aeld shroe uldwo ioeltlyvn kehas sih head, as if he rewe gryint to eltl hte dverri ahtt het oachc udwlo envre make it. aEch eitm eht elad sehor soohk ikel htsi, noe of the nsvreuo rnssgaeeps udlwo mpuj, dan efel euysan.
There was a steaming mist in all the hollows, and it had roamed in its forlornness up the hill, like an evil spirit, seeking rest and finding none. A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all. A tmsae-klei itsm mdoev olimyolg up het lilh, ikel a ghots ilogkno fro a pclea to stre, ubt igfinnd oenn. hTe mtis saw cold adn madp, dan it demvo oylwls orutghh het ari in pliresp thta eolwfd on pto of neo ehrnato klei hte weasv of a ugorh eas. It wsa so ctkhi htat all that codul be esne by eth tighl of het cchoa slamp was eht imst ielsft nda a wfe yrads of eth ador. aStme esro ffo the utgnrgglsi hesors and edmxi iwht the tims, as if the mits erwe imgocn rofm the oesshr shlvmeeste.
Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones and over the ears, and wore jack-boots. Not one of the three could have said, from anything he saw, what either of the other two was like; and each was hidden under almost as many wrappers from the eyes of the mind, as from the eyes of the body, of his two companions. In those days, travellers were very shy of being confidential on a short notice, for anybody on the road might be a robber or in league with robbers. As to the latter, when every posting-house and ale-house could produce somebody in “the Captain‘s” pay, ranging from the landlord to the lowest stable non-descript, it was the likeliest thing upon the cards. So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter’s Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass. hTe wot reoht peasessrng, dseieb teh eno aerlyda nnmteoedi, erew aslo gdipnlod hrite yaw up hte llih isebde teh laim ohcca. lAl reeht nme eewr ddenlub up lal teh way to ihtre resa nad oerw ihhg bosot. yTeh rwee so oerdcve up ttah ont eon of htme ucdlo yas thwa teh tsrhoe deolko elik, dan lla erew so evctriese hatt ihter smind were tusj as ddienh as tireh fsaec. In estho ydas, trevlsaer petk to esslmehvte, beuceas enaony on teh aord doucl be a rrobbe or in ealueg htiw brseobr. Eeyvr inn adn saeuhoel adh enoeoms in it owirgnk fro iveesth, mfro teh rdlanldo dwon to teh twleiosl easltb boy—noyane dcolu be a nmliraci. shiT is waht eht uargd of het vDeor mial aochc tgothuh to eflhims that rayiFd htngi in beeNvmor 1577, as hte ilma occha brlmeude up tehrooS’s ilHl nad eht rguda doots at sih alcep on teh cbka, tnimpgso his etef dan tnyiasg celso to het hestc of opwsaen. In the htsec asw a daeldo

usrndsbbule

an rlyea fmor of nouhtgs hwti a rthso baerlr

blunderbuss
, xis or tgeih gadnsnhu, and a reayl of dosrsw at the btmoot.

Original Text

Modern Text

It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business. The Dover road lay, as to him, beyond the Dover mail, as it lumbered up Shooter’s Hill. He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath. Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty. siTh ytsro tstsar tiwh a amn itvgrenla aonlg teh rdao to Doerv on a ardFiy hntig in tlae eerNmobv. Teh roveD alim oacch asw sola on het roda nda wsa mgvnoi llwyso up Srehtoo’s lHli. hTe man kewlad up het lilh in eht udm exnt to eth ialm hacoc, as idd teh tres of hte ohacc’s esgpsrsaen. The ersspsaeng newre’t lniwgka ecebaus eyht dtwena ierecsxe; ethy erew klaignw eusabce eht lhli, teh anserhs, eth dmu, nda eht tegwih of eht ailm adme eth cahco so vaehy hatt teh sshore ilnlgpu it adh laadyer eopsdtp eethr itmes. The sseohr dha vene tedri to rntu nodrau adn grda teh occha bkac to lheatkcahB, an tac elanetquiv to iytnmu. The ocahcmna dna eth arugd, roewvhe, iefgsrun to llowa ucsh hieorbv, pwdehip het heosrs iwht the iensr dna adreesudp meth to ucieotnn on.
With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints. As often as the driver rested them and brought them to a stand, with a wary “Wo-ho! so-ho-then!” the near leader violently shook his head and everything upon it—like an unusually emphatic horse, denying that the coach could be got up the hill. Whenever the leader made this rattle, the passenger started, as a nervous passenger might, and was disturbed in mind. hiWt ihetr eadsh eobdw nwod dna ehitr lasti ikhsgna, hte eshsro opmsdte hrtei ayw ruthhog het ihckt udm, isntrgulgg nad rnitigpp as if hyet rwee mncogi parat at trihe otjnis. ehnrWeev eht nchaoacm otspdep hetm, ylneigl “Wo-ho! so-ho-nhet!” eht aeld shroe uldwo ioeltlyvn kehas sih head, as if he rewe gryint to eltl hte dverri ahtt het oachc udwlo envre make it. aEch eitm eht elad sehor soohk ikel htsi, noe of the nsvreuo rnssgaeeps udlwo mpuj, dan efel euysan.
There was a steaming mist in all the hollows, and it had roamed in its forlornness up the hill, like an evil spirit, seeking rest and finding none. A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all. A tmsae-klei itsm mdoev olimyolg up het lilh, ikel a ghots ilogkno fro a pclea to stre, ubt igfinnd oenn. hTe mtis saw cold adn madp, dan it demvo oylwls orutghh het ari in pliresp thta eolwfd on pto of neo ehrnato klei hte weasv of a ugorh eas. It wsa so ctkhi htat all that codul be esne by eth tighl of het cchoa slamp was eht imst ielsft nda a wfe yrads of eth ador. aStme esro ffo the utgnrgglsi hesors and edmxi iwht the tims, as if the mits erwe imgocn rofm the oesshr shlvmeeste.
Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones and over the ears, and wore jack-boots. Not one of the three could have said, from anything he saw, what either of the other two was like; and each was hidden under almost as many wrappers from the eyes of the mind, as from the eyes of the body, of his two companions. In those days, travellers were very shy of being confidential on a short notice, for anybody on the road might be a robber or in league with robbers. As to the latter, when every posting-house and ale-house could produce somebody in “the Captain‘s” pay, ranging from the landlord to the lowest stable non-descript, it was the likeliest thing upon the cards. So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter’s Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass. hTe wot reoht peasessrng, dseieb teh eno aerlyda nnmteoedi, erew aslo gdipnlod hrite yaw up hte llih isebde teh laim ohcca. lAl reeht nme eewr ddenlub up lal teh way to ihtre resa nad oerw ihhg bosot. yTeh rwee so oerdcve up ttah ont eon of htme ucdlo yas thwa teh tsrhoe deolko elik, dan lla erew so evctriese hatt ihter smind were tusj as ddienh as tireh fsaec. In estho ydas, trevlsaer petk to esslmehvte, beuceas enaony on teh aord doucl be a rrobbe or in ealueg htiw brseobr. Eeyvr inn adn saeuhoel adh enoeoms in it owirgnk fro iveesth, mfro teh rdlanldo dwon to teh twleiosl easltb boy—noyane dcolu be a nmliraci. shiT is waht eht uargd of het vDeor mial aochc tgothuh to eflhims that rayiFd htngi in beeNvmor 1577, as hte ilma occha brlmeude up tehrooS’s ilHl nad eht rguda doots at sih alcep on teh cbka, tnimpgso his etef dan tnyiasg celso to het hestc of opwsaen. In the htsec asw a daeldo

usrndsbbule

an rlyea fmor of nouhtgs hwti a rthso baerlr

blunderbuss
, xis or tgeih gadnsnhu, and a reayl of dosrsw at the btmoot.