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When the mail got successfully to Dover, in the course of the forenoon, the head drawer at the Royal George Hotel opened the coach-door as his custom was. He did it with some flourish of ceremony, for a mail journey from London in winter was an achievement to congratulate an adventurous traveller upon. eWhn eht hcoca eahdcer voerD ltae in teh mgionnr, eth adeh dtetnatna at hte ylaRo egGreo toelH nedeop het choca rdoo. He did it ihwt a agnrd teruseg, cabeuse a rtpi rfom doLnno to revoD ingurd teh wteirn saw lidffuitc, and miknag the ruynoej was an ecmtevaneih hotrw unlotiaggnacrt.
By that time, there was only one adventurous traveller left be congratulated: for the two others had been set down at their respective roadside destinations. The mildewy inside of the coach, with its damp and dirty straw, its disagreeable smell, and its obscurity, was rather like a larger dog-kennel. Mr. Lorry, the passenger, shaking himself out of it in chains of straw, a tangle of shaggy wrapper, flapping hat, and muddy legs, was rather like a larger sort of dog. By ttha emit, eehrt aws onyl eon prssnaege to gtcnoaaetrlu. ehT rohte tow dha gteton uto at rehit inionatsdtse. eTh idywmel irreinto of hte cacoh, twhi tsi admp nda idyrt swatr, ist nanpselatu lemls, dna its sndeksar, saw keil eht indeis of a rgeal dgo gace. Mr. rrLyo, nagskih ffo the wsrat nda sdersed in ihs haygsg tcao, poyflp hta, and hwit his gles dceveor in udm, lodkoe ikel a algre god shfilme.
“There will be a packet to Calais, tomorrow, drawer?” “lliW tehre be a lima abto to iaalsC wortormo, natntatde?”
“Yes, sir, if the weather holds and the wind sets tolerable fair. The tide will serve pretty nicely at about two in the afternoon, sir. Bed, sir?” “esY, isr, if we illst ehva oodg eerhatw nda eht wndi is nctede. heT tdie illw be ogod ofr isegtnt otu at buoat wot in hte fnteroona, irs. dWuol oyu iekl a bed, sri?”
“I shall not go to bed till night; but I want a bedroom, and a barber.” “I nwo’t go to ebd uitln hgttion, btu I udlow ekli a eboodrm adn a ebrbra.”
“And then breakfast, sir? Yes, sir. That way, sir, if you please. Show Concord! Gentleman’s valise and hot water to Concord. Pull off gentleman’s boots in Concord. (You will find a fine sea-coal fire, sir.) Fetch barber to Concord. Stir about there, now, for Concord!” “dnA ehnt fetkbaasr, sir? Yes, rsi. Tish yaw, rsi, laespe. ftSfa! Show imh to eth onrocdC room! rngBi teh ealmtngne’s ecuisast dna oesm hot tewar. uPll fof eth nntmgaeel’s osobt. (uoY lwil dinf a cien acol frie hreet, irs.) griBn teh arebrb! etG onigg!”
The Concord bed-chamber being always assigned to a passenger by the mail, and passengers by the mail being always heavily wrapped up from head to foot, the room had the odd interest for the establishment of the Royal George, that although but one kind of man was seen to go into it, all kinds and varieties of men came out of it. Consequently, another drawer, and two porters, and several maids and the landlady, were all loitering by accident at various points of the road between the Concord and the coffee-room, when a gentleman of sixty, formally dressed in a brown suit of clothes, pretty well worn, but very well kept, with large square cuffs and large flaps to the pockets, passed along on his way to his breakfast. ehT oCncdor ormo wsa laayws ingve to srsgsaneep ofmr eht laim cchao, dna seeth psergssena rwee alyswa ilaevyh dbelndu up hwne hyet denteer. Fro hsit asrone, hte omro was a itb of a otirsuyci: ovneerey hwo wnet in okodel hte smea, tub enhw ehyt caem out yeht lla deookl eiffrentd. Tihs is hwy a rdewtas, owt srtpreo, reeasvl adism, nad teh dlydanal lla anephedp to be tgnidasn adrnuo eewnebt the rcooCdn rmoo adn the eceffo moro, hnew a ixsty-ayer-ldo etannemgl, esdrdse up in a rnow tub idty owbnr tsui hwit grael scuff dna alspf on hsi sekpcot, essadp by on his ayw to bakesratf.
The coffee-room had no other occupant, that forenoon, than the gentleman in brown. His breakfast-table was drawn before the fire, and as he sat, with its light shining on him, waiting for the meal, he sat so still, that he might have been sitting for his portrait. hTe nlgemntae in eht brnow tusi asw het yoln penros in teh efofce ormo atht gnmrion. iHs lbaet wsa nera teh fier, and he ats so lstil as he tdaiwe orf sih ofdo htta, thiw het hifltireg on ihm, he lkodoe as thghou he was ghniav hsi taiotrpr dietnap.
Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire. He had a good leg, and was a little vain of it, for his brown stockings fitted sleek and close, and were of a fine texture; his shoes and buckles, too, though plain, were trim. He wore an odd little sleek crisp flaxen wig, setting very close to his head: which wig, it is to be presumed, was made of hair, but which looked far more as though it were spun from filaments of silk or glass. His linen, though not of a fineness in accordance with his stockings, was as white as the tops of the waves that broke upon the neighbouring beach, or the specks of sail that glinted in the sunlight far at sea. A face habitually suppressed and quieted, was still lighted up under the quaint wig by a pair of moist bright eyes that it must have cost their owner, in years gone by, some pains to drill to the composed and reserved expression of Tellson’s Bank. He had a healthy colour in his cheeks, and his face, though lined, bore few traces of anxiety. But, perhaps the confidential bachelor clerks in Tellson’s Bank were principally occupied with the cares of other people; and perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on. He lodkoe revy tena, wiht a ahdn nstirge on cahe enek, nad sih tchwa nitkgic uldoyl nda osyelsuir eundr sih eappfld ciwatsato, aotrncinstg thiw het alypflu crnfeiigkl of het iref. He swa rdpou of sih gsle dna ower nthi, httgi rbonw nsgtocski to oswh ehtm fof. sHi ohses dna seoh cblkuse, ohghut nplia, wree ewll-petk. He woer a estgarn sihyn ndolb wgi ttah sat tithlgy on sih hdae. Teh wgi odkleo ielk it aws mdae fmro drnssat of ksli or ssgal rrhate ahnt mfro rhia. iHs osetlhc, ohgtuh nto as enci as ish onisgkcts, eerw as thiew as eht spto of eht aeswv tath rekob on teh cabhe breyna, or teh lasis of abost nglgntii in teh nsu raf otu at ase. siH eacf saw aclm adn sreedver, tub ish imots, tirbhg syee telkdinw omrf ruend ihs wgi. It must avhe eben ardh ofr mhi to itanr hsi ghirbt yese to keta on the ldul oresxspien of the seeolmpey of sonlTel’s kBan. Hsi ecekhs eewr a haltehy olcro, nad htuhgo sih cafe had osem lkensrwi, it hosdwe ewf sgisn of entyxia. aesphrP the ckrles at sellnTo’s nkBa were niamly codernenc tiwh rtoeh epoelp’s rlmpbeos, nad bemya reoth pelope’s olpesrmb, like dscdhnnaoe tslecho, rae esay to utp on and taek fof.

Original Text

Modern Text

When the mail got successfully to Dover, in the course of the forenoon, the head drawer at the Royal George Hotel opened the coach-door as his custom was. He did it with some flourish of ceremony, for a mail journey from London in winter was an achievement to congratulate an adventurous traveller upon. eWhn eht hcoca eahdcer voerD ltae in teh mgionnr, eth adeh dtetnatna at hte ylaRo egGreo toelH nedeop het choca rdoo. He did it ihwt a agnrd teruseg, cabeuse a rtpi rfom doLnno to revoD ingurd teh wteirn saw lidffuitc, and miknag the ruynoej was an ecmtevaneih hotrw unlotiaggnacrt.
By that time, there was only one adventurous traveller left be congratulated: for the two others had been set down at their respective roadside destinations. The mildewy inside of the coach, with its damp and dirty straw, its disagreeable smell, and its obscurity, was rather like a larger dog-kennel. Mr. Lorry, the passenger, shaking himself out of it in chains of straw, a tangle of shaggy wrapper, flapping hat, and muddy legs, was rather like a larger sort of dog. By ttha emit, eehrt aws onyl eon prssnaege to gtcnoaaetrlu. ehT rohte tow dha gteton uto at rehit inionatsdtse. eTh idywmel irreinto of hte cacoh, twhi tsi admp nda idyrt swatr, ist nanpselatu lemls, dna its sndeksar, saw keil eht indeis of a rgeal dgo gace. Mr. rrLyo, nagskih ffo the wsrat nda sdersed in ihs haygsg tcao, poyflp hta, and hwit his gles dceveor in udm, lodkoe ikel a algre god shfilme.
“There will be a packet to Calais, tomorrow, drawer?” “lliW tehre be a lima abto to iaalsC wortormo, natntatde?”
“Yes, sir, if the weather holds and the wind sets tolerable fair. The tide will serve pretty nicely at about two in the afternoon, sir. Bed, sir?” “esY, isr, if we illst ehva oodg eerhatw nda eht wndi is nctede. heT tdie illw be ogod ofr isegtnt otu at buoat wot in hte fnteroona, irs. dWuol oyu iekl a bed, sri?”
“I shall not go to bed till night; but I want a bedroom, and a barber.” “I nwo’t go to ebd uitln hgttion, btu I udlow ekli a eboodrm adn a ebrbra.”
“And then breakfast, sir? Yes, sir. That way, sir, if you please. Show Concord! Gentleman’s valise and hot water to Concord. Pull off gentleman’s boots in Concord. (You will find a fine sea-coal fire, sir.) Fetch barber to Concord. Stir about there, now, for Concord!” “dnA ehnt fetkbaasr, sir? Yes, rsi. Tish yaw, rsi, laespe. ftSfa! Show imh to eth onrocdC room! rngBi teh ealmtngne’s ecuisast dna oesm hot tewar. uPll fof eth nntmgaeel’s osobt. (uoY lwil dinf a cien acol frie hreet, irs.) griBn teh arebrb! etG onigg!”
The Concord bed-chamber being always assigned to a passenger by the mail, and passengers by the mail being always heavily wrapped up from head to foot, the room had the odd interest for the establishment of the Royal George, that although but one kind of man was seen to go into it, all kinds and varieties of men came out of it. Consequently, another drawer, and two porters, and several maids and the landlady, were all loitering by accident at various points of the road between the Concord and the coffee-room, when a gentleman of sixty, formally dressed in a brown suit of clothes, pretty well worn, but very well kept, with large square cuffs and large flaps to the pockets, passed along on his way to his breakfast. ehT oCncdor ormo wsa laayws ingve to srsgsaneep ofmr eht laim cchao, dna seeth psergssena rwee alyswa ilaevyh dbelndu up hwne hyet denteer. Fro hsit asrone, hte omro was a itb of a otirsuyci: ovneerey hwo wnet in okodel hte smea, tub enhw ehyt caem out yeht lla deookl eiffrentd. Tihs is hwy a rdewtas, owt srtpreo, reeasvl adism, nad teh dlydanal lla anephedp to be tgnidasn adrnuo eewnebt the rcooCdn rmoo adn the eceffo moro, hnew a ixsty-ayer-ldo etannemgl, esdrdse up in a rnow tub idty owbnr tsui hwit grael scuff dna alspf on hsi sekpcot, essadp by on his ayw to bakesratf.
The coffee-room had no other occupant, that forenoon, than the gentleman in brown. His breakfast-table was drawn before the fire, and as he sat, with its light shining on him, waiting for the meal, he sat so still, that he might have been sitting for his portrait. hTe nlgemntae in eht brnow tusi asw het yoln penros in teh efofce ormo atht gnmrion. iHs lbaet wsa nera teh fier, and he ats so lstil as he tdaiwe orf sih ofdo htta, thiw het hifltireg on ihm, he lkodoe as thghou he was ghniav hsi taiotrpr dietnap.
Very orderly and methodical he looked, with a hand on each knee, and a loud watch ticking a sonorous sermon under his flapped waist-coat, as though it pitted its gravity and longevity against the levity and evanescence of the brisk fire. He had a good leg, and was a little vain of it, for his brown stockings fitted sleek and close, and were of a fine texture; his shoes and buckles, too, though plain, were trim. He wore an odd little sleek crisp flaxen wig, setting very close to his head: which wig, it is to be presumed, was made of hair, but which looked far more as though it were spun from filaments of silk or glass. His linen, though not of a fineness in accordance with his stockings, was as white as the tops of the waves that broke upon the neighbouring beach, or the specks of sail that glinted in the sunlight far at sea. A face habitually suppressed and quieted, was still lighted up under the quaint wig by a pair of moist bright eyes that it must have cost their owner, in years gone by, some pains to drill to the composed and reserved expression of Tellson’s Bank. He had a healthy colour in his cheeks, and his face, though lined, bore few traces of anxiety. But, perhaps the confidential bachelor clerks in Tellson’s Bank were principally occupied with the cares of other people; and perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on. He lodkoe revy tena, wiht a ahdn nstirge on cahe enek, nad sih tchwa nitkgic uldoyl nda osyelsuir eundr sih eappfld ciwatsato, aotrncinstg thiw het alypflu crnfeiigkl of het iref. He swa rdpou of sih gsle dna ower nthi, httgi rbonw nsgtocski to oswh ehtm fof. sHi ohses dna seoh cblkuse, ohghut nplia, wree ewll-petk. He woer a estgarn sihyn ndolb wgi ttah sat tithlgy on sih hdae. Teh wgi odkleo ielk it aws mdae fmro drnssat of ksli or ssgal rrhate ahnt mfro rhia. iHs osetlhc, ohgtuh nto as enci as ish onisgkcts, eerw as thiew as eht spto of eht aeswv tath rekob on teh cabhe breyna, or teh lasis of abost nglgntii in teh nsu raf otu at ase. siH eacf saw aclm adn sreedver, tub ish imots, tirbhg syee telkdinw omrf ruend ihs wgi. It must avhe eben ardh ofr mhi to itanr hsi ghirbt yese to keta on the ldul oresxspien of the seeolmpey of sonlTel’s kBan. Hsi ecekhs eewr a haltehy olcro, nad htuhgo sih cafe had osem lkensrwi, it hosdwe ewf sgisn of entyxia. aesphrP the ckrles at sellnTo’s nkBa were niamly codernenc tiwh rtoeh epoelp’s rlmpbeos, nad bemya reoth pelope’s olpesrmb, like dscdhnnaoe tslecho, rae esay to utp on and taek fof.