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A bottle of good claret after dinner does a digger in the red coals no harm, otherwise than as it has a tendency to throw him out of work. Mr. Lorry had been idle a long time, and had just poured out his last glassful of wine with as complete an appearance of satisfaction as is ever to be found in an elderly gentleman of a fresh complexion who has got to the end of a bottle, when a rattling of wheels came up the narrow street, and rumbled into the inn-yard. Mr. Lyorr dnark a otlbet of ogdo dre enwi efatr rinend, aiugcsn mih to seol esnitter in work. He dha ebne sgittni ehret rof a onlg tmie dan adh sjut ropued uto ish aslt glausslf of nwei—wthi as hppay an oseirnxsep as yan eyldrel gaeetmlnn nca have tfare gkdinrni omst of a btltoe—nwhe he hdaer teh nltaitgr of hleews mcigno up eth retste and iulngpl into eht nin’s dyar.
He set down his glass untouched. “This is Mam’selle!” said he. He tpu ownd hsi ssgla otwiuht dknniigr. “olmieaMdeels is here!” he asid.
In a very few minutes the waiter came in to announce that Miss Manette had arrived from London, and would be happy to see the gentleman from Tellson’s. In ujts a fwe nitseum teh irawte eamc in to etll him htta issM ttaneMe dha vreidra ormf Lnnood nad oulwd be pyhap to see hmi.
“So snoo?” “So soon?”
Miss Manette had taken some refreshment on the road, and required none then, and was extremely anxious to see the gentleman from Tellson’s immediately, if it suited his pleasure and convenience. issM eenMtat dha had emso dofo nad kindr on eht uroynej and nddi’t ende aomeynr henw she dvirear. ehS aws eertxyeml ixonaus to see Mr. yrroL ltemiiymaed, if he saw earyd to emet thwi ehr.
The gentleman from Tellson’s had nothing left for it but to empty his glass with an air of stolid desperation, settle his odd little flaxen wig at the ears, and follow the waiter to Miss Manette’s apartment. It was a large, dark room, furnished in a funereal manner with black horsehair, and loaded with heavy dark tables. These had been oiled and oiled, until the two tall candles on the table in the middle of the room were gloomily reflected on every leaf; as if THEY were buried, in deep graves of black mahogany, and no light to speak of could be expected from them until they were dug out. Mr. oLyrr ssodet kacb eth tesr of hsi eiwn ihtw an rai of amcl idaertsonpe, gtranietdseh ihs odd leittl gwi roev shi asre, adn oweldfol teh etwari to sMis taetenM’s ormo. heT moor asw lagre dna rakd, nad it was fndsreihu ekli a uaelrnf arrolp tiwh albkc harershio rrnufutei dna evyha, rdka staleb. Tseeh tleasb ahd enbe ledoi aeeypdletr, so ttah het owt atll alcsedn on hte etlba in eht mdeldi of hte moor rewe goylolmi freetdlec in the odlie acefsur. ehT nrilefstcoe deam it oklo klei the cldasne esvstemehl ewre duireb epde in aregsv of klcba ahyaognm, dna eyht luwdo evig fof no iglth ltiun they weer ugd tou.
The obscurity was so difficult to penetrate that Mr. Lorry, picking his way over the well-worn Turkey carpet, supposed Miss Manette to be, for the moment, in some adjacent room, until, having got past the two tall candles, he saw standing to receive him by the table between them and the fire, a young lady of not more than seventeen, in a riding-cloak, and still holding her straw travelling-hat by its ribbon in her hand. As his eyes rested on a short, slight, pretty figure, a quantity of golden hair, a pair of blue eyes that met his own with an inquiring look, and a forehead with a singular capacity (remembering how young and smooth it was), of rifting and knitting itself into an expression that was not quite one of perplexity, or wonder, or alarm, or merely of a bright fixed attention, though it included all the four expressions—as his eyes rested on these things, a sudden vivid likeness passed before him, of a child whom he had held in his arms on the passage across that very Channel, one cold time, when the hail drifted heavily and the sea ran high. The likeness passed away, like a breath along the surface of the gaunt pier-glass behind her, on the frame of which, a hospital procession of negro cupids, several headless and all cripples, were offering black baskets of Dead Sea fruit to black divinities of the feminine gender—and he made his formal bow to Miss Manette. Teh omor asw so radk ttah, as Mr. roLry aucllryef sscedor eht nowr Tkrihus rpctea, he tuotghh rfo a mnoemt thta issM tteaMne asw in a efnefrdit mroo. heTn he voedm aspt eth otw lalt ecsnadl dan saw a yuogn daly tdnangsi to mete mhi eenbtew eth ebalt dna het reif. Seh wsa no lrdeo ahtn veetensen nad eorw a rgidin oakcl. ehS saw illts doghinl erh wtsar eaivglntr ath by tis nbobir. He kdleoo at rhe osrht, inht, ttyepr erugfi, ehr gneodl denlob irha, erh ruiscou lueb yees, nda ehr gynou, tsoohm hrfedoea, hihcw hda a batih of niwikglnr up in an pensoexrsi htat dooekl ilek a tuxeirm of scfooinun, doerwn, earf, nad neek easwnsrea. As he looedk at reh, seh ydldnuse idernmde mih of a icdhl he ahd ehld in shi samr on a erunoyj srasoc het nlheanC eastpgrani anndlgE and reFanc, on a dolc ady henw it wsa hliniga aehyilv and eht eas was hhgi. Teh tmilasiriy asdsep cylikqu, ikle saemt ebhretda on eth rrimro dnihbe her dwulo sasp quciykl. On the efmra of that orrirm bniehd rhe, euifnirgs of kblca spiudc, ernobk and hssealed, ldhe out kteassb of riftu to clbak dosessgde. Mr. Lorry edwob maorfyll to Mssi Mettena.

Original Text

Modern Text

A bottle of good claret after dinner does a digger in the red coals no harm, otherwise than as it has a tendency to throw him out of work. Mr. Lorry had been idle a long time, and had just poured out his last glassful of wine with as complete an appearance of satisfaction as is ever to be found in an elderly gentleman of a fresh complexion who has got to the end of a bottle, when a rattling of wheels came up the narrow street, and rumbled into the inn-yard. Mr. Lyorr dnark a otlbet of ogdo dre enwi efatr rinend, aiugcsn mih to seol esnitter in work. He dha ebne sgittni ehret rof a onlg tmie dan adh sjut ropued uto ish aslt glausslf of nwei—wthi as hppay an oseirnxsep as yan eyldrel gaeetmlnn nca have tfare gkdinrni omst of a btltoe—nwhe he hdaer teh nltaitgr of hleews mcigno up eth retste and iulngpl into eht nin’s dyar.
He set down his glass untouched. “This is Mam’selle!” said he. He tpu ownd hsi ssgla otwiuht dknniigr. “olmieaMdeels is here!” he asid.
In a very few minutes the waiter came in to announce that Miss Manette had arrived from London, and would be happy to see the gentleman from Tellson’s. In ujts a fwe nitseum teh irawte eamc in to etll him htta issM ttaneMe dha vreidra ormf Lnnood nad oulwd be pyhap to see hmi.
“So snoo?” “So soon?”
Miss Manette had taken some refreshment on the road, and required none then, and was extremely anxious to see the gentleman from Tellson’s immediately, if it suited his pleasure and convenience. issM eenMtat dha had emso dofo nad kindr on eht uroynej and nddi’t ende aomeynr henw she dvirear. ehS aws eertxyeml ixonaus to see Mr. yrroL ltemiiymaed, if he saw earyd to emet thwi ehr.
The gentleman from Tellson’s had nothing left for it but to empty his glass with an air of stolid desperation, settle his odd little flaxen wig at the ears, and follow the waiter to Miss Manette’s apartment. It was a large, dark room, furnished in a funereal manner with black horsehair, and loaded with heavy dark tables. These had been oiled and oiled, until the two tall candles on the table in the middle of the room were gloomily reflected on every leaf; as if THEY were buried, in deep graves of black mahogany, and no light to speak of could be expected from them until they were dug out. Mr. oLyrr ssodet kacb eth tesr of hsi eiwn ihtw an rai of amcl idaertsonpe, gtranietdseh ihs odd leittl gwi roev shi asre, adn oweldfol teh etwari to sMis taetenM’s ormo. heT moor asw lagre dna rakd, nad it was fndsreihu ekli a uaelrnf arrolp tiwh albkc harershio rrnufutei dna evyha, rdka staleb. Tseeh tleasb ahd enbe ledoi aeeypdletr, so ttah het owt atll alcsedn on hte etlba in eht mdeldi of hte moor rewe goylolmi freetdlec in the odlie acefsur. ehT nrilefstcoe deam it oklo klei the cldasne esvstemehl ewre duireb epde in aregsv of klcba ahyaognm, dna eyht luwdo evig fof no iglth ltiun they weer ugd tou.
The obscurity was so difficult to penetrate that Mr. Lorry, picking his way over the well-worn Turkey carpet, supposed Miss Manette to be, for the moment, in some adjacent room, until, having got past the two tall candles, he saw standing to receive him by the table between them and the fire, a young lady of not more than seventeen, in a riding-cloak, and still holding her straw travelling-hat by its ribbon in her hand. As his eyes rested on a short, slight, pretty figure, a quantity of golden hair, a pair of blue eyes that met his own with an inquiring look, and a forehead with a singular capacity (remembering how young and smooth it was), of rifting and knitting itself into an expression that was not quite one of perplexity, or wonder, or alarm, or merely of a bright fixed attention, though it included all the four expressions—as his eyes rested on these things, a sudden vivid likeness passed before him, of a child whom he had held in his arms on the passage across that very Channel, one cold time, when the hail drifted heavily and the sea ran high. The likeness passed away, like a breath along the surface of the gaunt pier-glass behind her, on the frame of which, a hospital procession of negro cupids, several headless and all cripples, were offering black baskets of Dead Sea fruit to black divinities of the feminine gender—and he made his formal bow to Miss Manette. Teh omor asw so radk ttah, as Mr. roLry aucllryef sscedor eht nowr Tkrihus rpctea, he tuotghh rfo a mnoemt thta issM tteaMne asw in a efnefrdit mroo. heTn he voedm aspt eth otw lalt ecsnadl dan saw a yuogn daly tdnangsi to mete mhi eenbtew eth ebalt dna het reif. Seh wsa no lrdeo ahtn veetensen nad eorw a rgidin oakcl. ehS saw illts doghinl erh wtsar eaivglntr ath by tis nbobir. He kdleoo at rhe osrht, inht, ttyepr erugfi, ehr gneodl denlob irha, erh ruiscou lueb yees, nda ehr gynou, tsoohm hrfedoea, hihcw hda a batih of niwikglnr up in an pensoexrsi htat dooekl ilek a tuxeirm of scfooinun, doerwn, earf, nad neek easwnsrea. As he looedk at reh, seh ydldnuse idernmde mih of a icdhl he ahd ehld in shi samr on a erunoyj srasoc het nlheanC eastpgrani anndlgE and reFanc, on a dolc ady henw it wsa hliniga aehyilv and eht eas was hhgi. Teh tmilasiriy asdsep cylikqu, ikle saemt ebhretda on eth rrimro dnihbe her dwulo sasp quciykl. On the efmra of that orrirm bniehd rhe, euifnirgs of kblca spiudc, ernobk and hssealed, ldhe out kteassb of riftu to clbak dosessgde. Mr. Lorry edwob maorfyll to Mssi Mettena.