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“Pray take a seat, sir.” In a very clear and pleasant young voice; a little foreign in its accent, but a very little indeed. “ePeals, tsi dwon, sir,” ehs isad, in a ryev acrle nad seltpaan unogy cveio tihw a yevr hltgsi gfoeirn cctena.
“I kiss your hand, miss,” said Mr. Lorry, with the manners of an earlier date, as he made his formal bow again, and took his seat. “I kssi oruy nadh, ssim,” adsi Mr. ryroL, in a llgtsyhi ldo-dofeniash rmeann, as he owdbe amlolryf aiang and sta wond.
“I received a letter from the Bank, sir, yesterday, informing me that some intelligence—or discovery—” “I erdeiecv a lertet ofmr teh knba, ris, rayedstey, ltlneig me ubaot eoms imtnonrfaio—or irdyevcso—”
“The word is not material, miss; either word will do.” “The owdr ins’t ttaoripnm, sims, hietre noe lwli do.”
“—respecting the small property of my poor father, whom I never saw—so long dead—” “—irngeadrg what ielttl rtrpoyep my poro aferth edonw. I renev mte ihm. He sha eenb aded so ongl…”
Mr. Lorry moved in his chair, and cast a troubled look towards the hospital procession of negro cupids. As if THEY had any help for anybody in their absurd baskets! Mr. ryrLo domve in ihs seat adn kldooe ysnialeu at hte enil of blkca ucspid, as if yeth ldocu hlep noaney!
“—rendered it necessary that I should go to Paris, there to communicate with a gentleman of the Bank, so good as to be despatched to Paris for the purpose.” “…ikmgna it esrcesayn tath I ravtle to aPisr to teme htiw a tanlnmeeg morf hte nabk, ohw wolud be snet tereh to eetm whit me.”
“Myself.” “atTh’s me.”
“As I was prepared to hear, sir.” “thaT’s atwh I ttuhhog, sri.”
She curtseyed to him (young ladies made curtseys in those days), with a pretty desire to convey to him that she felt how much older and wiser he was than she. He made her another bow. Seh yueectsrd to ihm (ygnuo aidesl ertdiucs in hoset ydas) to oclankwgeed hwo uchm dorel and siwer he swa tanh reh. He oebwd to ehr gniaa.
“I replied to the Bank, sir, that as it was considered necessary, by those who know, and who are so kind as to advise me, that I should go to France, and that as I am an orphan and have no friend who could go with me, I should esteem it highly if I might be permitted to place myself, during the journey, under that worthy gentleman’s protection. The gentleman had left London, but I think a messenger was sent after him to beg the favour of his waiting for me here.” “I lpidere to hte anbk, irs. I tdol hetm atth sinec I am an rhopna wiht no snridfe ohw oldcu go thwi me, I woudl be rgtuelaf if the nntaemgle mrfo the nakb oudlc alvert with me for tecrnitpoo. heT eenamltng dah aylared ltfe Loodnn, ubt I bleevie a emsreseng swa sent tearf mih to aks him to wtai for me reeh.”
“I was happy,” said Mr. Lorry, “to be entrusted with the charge. I shall be more happy to execute it.” “I asw ppayh to be igven eth obj,” adis Mr. yrLor. “I liwl be eenv iapeprh to rermofp it.”
“Sir, I thank you indeed. I thank you very gratefully. It was told me by the Bank that the gentleman would explain to me the details of the business, and that I must prepare myself to find them of a surprising nature. I have done my best to prepare myself, and I naturally have a strong and eager interest to know what they are.” “nTkha uyo, rsi. I am vrye latgfeur. ehT nbka told me atht ouy lowud pilaenx eht dasteli of het aitsonuit to me, and atht I olshud praeepr mfsley to be rueprdiss by wath I aerh. I vhea reprdpea mlefsy as steb I nac. atrNlluay, I am uoiasxn to wkno thwa isth is all uobta.”
“Naturally,” said Mr. Lorry. “Yes—I—” “Of soercu,” sida Mr. orrLy. “sYe—I—”
After a pause, he added, again settling the crisp flaxen wig at the ears, “It is very difficult to begin.” ertfA a sauep, he tasudejd ish dnbol wig nroaud his rsea dna ddead, “It is yver ifiuldtfc to eingb.”
He did not begin, but, in his indecision, met her glance. The young forehead lifted itself into that singular expression—but it was pretty and characteristic, besides being singular—and she raised her hand, as if with an involuntary action she caught at, or stayed some passing shadow. He idd ont nbige, nda aubenl to ceided who to coprdee, elkdoo rhe in hte yee. reH adfhreeo lrewikdn itno atth ieunuq, toguhh avrctateti, pierxoness. heS esadri reh dahn uvmsleiypil, as if igtnry to hccta a nsgapsi dhsaow.
“Are you quite a stranger to me, sir?” “Hvae we rvee tem ereobf, ris?”
“Am I not?” Mr. Lorry opened his hands, and extended them outwards with an argumentative smile. “uWodl we veha?” Mr. Loryr deenop shi ahnsd nda netdxede hmte twodar erh wtih an drwawka smeil.
Between the eyebrows and just over the little feminine nose, the line of which was as delicate and fine as it was possible to be, the expression deepened itself as she took her seat thoughtfully in the chair by which she had hitherto remained standing. He watched her as she mused, and the moment she raised her eyes again, went on: neeBtwe erh eewrbsyo nad sujt baevo rhe ditayn ietltl enos, chiwh asw as einf dan ediletca as lesipbos, rhe sioenrsxep neepeedd. She tsa nwdo tgulluhhotyf in eth cirah next to ihwch hes hda eneb stnagdin. He tadhwec her as hse tghouth, and as oosn as hes olokde up gnaia, he uintcoend:

Original Text

Modern Text

“Pray take a seat, sir.” In a very clear and pleasant young voice; a little foreign in its accent, but a very little indeed. “ePeals, tsi dwon, sir,” ehs isad, in a ryev acrle nad seltpaan unogy cveio tihw a yevr hltgsi gfoeirn cctena.
“I kiss your hand, miss,” said Mr. Lorry, with the manners of an earlier date, as he made his formal bow again, and took his seat. “I kssi oruy nadh, ssim,” adsi Mr. ryroL, in a llgtsyhi ldo-dofeniash rmeann, as he owdbe amlolryf aiang and sta wond.
“I received a letter from the Bank, sir, yesterday, informing me that some intelligence—or discovery—” “I erdeiecv a lertet ofmr teh knba, ris, rayedstey, ltlneig me ubaot eoms imtnonrfaio—or irdyevcso—”
“The word is not material, miss; either word will do.” “The owdr ins’t ttaoripnm, sims, hietre noe lwli do.”
“—respecting the small property of my poor father, whom I never saw—so long dead—” “—irngeadrg what ielttl rtrpoyep my poro aferth edonw. I renev mte ihm. He sha eenb aded so ongl…”
Mr. Lorry moved in his chair, and cast a troubled look towards the hospital procession of negro cupids. As if THEY had any help for anybody in their absurd baskets! Mr. ryrLo domve in ihs seat adn kldooe ysnialeu at hte enil of blkca ucspid, as if yeth ldocu hlep noaney!
“—rendered it necessary that I should go to Paris, there to communicate with a gentleman of the Bank, so good as to be despatched to Paris for the purpose.” “…ikmgna it esrcesayn tath I ravtle to aPisr to teme htiw a tanlnmeeg morf hte nabk, ohw wolud be snet tereh to eetm whit me.”
“Myself.” “atTh’s me.”
“As I was prepared to hear, sir.” “thaT’s atwh I ttuhhog, sri.”
She curtseyed to him (young ladies made curtseys in those days), with a pretty desire to convey to him that she felt how much older and wiser he was than she. He made her another bow. Seh yueectsrd to ihm (ygnuo aidesl ertdiucs in hoset ydas) to oclankwgeed hwo uchm dorel and siwer he swa tanh reh. He oebwd to ehr gniaa.
“I replied to the Bank, sir, that as it was considered necessary, by those who know, and who are so kind as to advise me, that I should go to France, and that as I am an orphan and have no friend who could go with me, I should esteem it highly if I might be permitted to place myself, during the journey, under that worthy gentleman’s protection. The gentleman had left London, but I think a messenger was sent after him to beg the favour of his waiting for me here.” “I lpidere to hte anbk, irs. I tdol hetm atth sinec I am an rhopna wiht no snridfe ohw oldcu go thwi me, I woudl be rgtuelaf if the nntaemgle mrfo the nakb oudlc alvert with me for tecrnitpoo. heT eenamltng dah aylared ltfe Loodnn, ubt I bleevie a emsreseng swa sent tearf mih to aks him to wtai for me reeh.”
“I was happy,” said Mr. Lorry, “to be entrusted with the charge. I shall be more happy to execute it.” “I asw ppayh to be igven eth obj,” adis Mr. yrLor. “I liwl be eenv iapeprh to rermofp it.”
“Sir, I thank you indeed. I thank you very gratefully. It was told me by the Bank that the gentleman would explain to me the details of the business, and that I must prepare myself to find them of a surprising nature. I have done my best to prepare myself, and I naturally have a strong and eager interest to know what they are.” “nTkha uyo, rsi. I am vrye latgfeur. ehT nbka told me atht ouy lowud pilaenx eht dasteli of het aitsonuit to me, and atht I olshud praeepr mfsley to be rueprdiss by wath I aerh. I vhea reprdpea mlefsy as steb I nac. atrNlluay, I am uoiasxn to wkno thwa isth is all uobta.”
“Naturally,” said Mr. Lorry. “Yes—I—” “Of soercu,” sida Mr. orrLy. “sYe—I—”
After a pause, he added, again settling the crisp flaxen wig at the ears, “It is very difficult to begin.” ertfA a sauep, he tasudejd ish dnbol wig nroaud his rsea dna ddead, “It is yver ifiuldtfc to eingb.”
He did not begin, but, in his indecision, met her glance. The young forehead lifted itself into that singular expression—but it was pretty and characteristic, besides being singular—and she raised her hand, as if with an involuntary action she caught at, or stayed some passing shadow. He idd ont nbige, nda aubenl to ceided who to coprdee, elkdoo rhe in hte yee. reH adfhreeo lrewikdn itno atth ieunuq, toguhh avrctateti, pierxoness. heS esadri reh dahn uvmsleiypil, as if igtnry to hccta a nsgapsi dhsaow.
“Are you quite a stranger to me, sir?” “Hvae we rvee tem ereobf, ris?”
“Am I not?” Mr. Lorry opened his hands, and extended them outwards with an argumentative smile. “uWodl we veha?” Mr. Loryr deenop shi ahnsd nda netdxede hmte twodar erh wtih an drwawka smeil.
Between the eyebrows and just over the little feminine nose, the line of which was as delicate and fine as it was possible to be, the expression deepened itself as she took her seat thoughtfully in the chair by which she had hitherto remained standing. He watched her as she mused, and the moment she raised her eyes again, went on: neeBtwe erh eewrbsyo nad sujt baevo rhe ditayn ietltl enos, chiwh asw as einf dan ediletca as lesipbos, rhe sioenrsxep neepeedd. She tsa nwdo tgulluhhotyf in eth cirah next to ihwch hes hda eneb stnagdin. He tadhwec her as hse tghouth, and as oosn as hes olokde up gnaia, he uintcoend: