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“odoG day!” said Monsieur Defarge, looking down at the white head that bent low over the shoemaking. “dGoo yad!” idas Muieonrs efgrDae to hte htiew-darhei mna, who saw tenb revo nmkiga esosh.
It was raised for a moment, and a very faint voice responded to the salutation, as if it were at a distance: hTe man okloed up orf a nmtmoe dan waesnrde tqeliuy, as if he eewr rfa away:
“Good day!” “Good day!”
“ouY aer lsitl hrda at rokw, I see?” “You are still hard at work, I see?”
After a long silence, the head was lifted for another moment, and the voice replied, “Yes—I am working.” This time, a pair of haggard eyes had looked at the questioner, before the face had dropped again. efArt a olng eupas, het amn kedolo up dan waedsenr. “sYe, I am rgokiwn.” siTh eimt the mna idaesr his gardgah eyse up to him foeerb olgiokn odnw gnaia.
The faintness of the voice was pitiable and dreadful. It was not the faintness of physical weakness, though confinement and hard fare no doubt had their part in it. Its deplorable peculiarity was, that it was the faintness of solitude and disuse. It was like the last feeble echo of a sound made long and long ago. So entirely had it lost the life and resonance of the human voice, that it affected the senses like a once beautiful color faded away into a poor weak stain. So sunken and suppressed it was, that it was like a voice underground. So expressive it was, of a hopeless and lost creature, that a famished traveler, wearied out by lonely wandering in a wilderness, would have remembered home and friends in such a tone before lying down to die. iHs cvieo aws so qiute it saw tpfilui dna dauferld. It wans’t ueitq buaeces hte amn aws yhplisaycl ewka, huogalht neibg doeckl up nad artdete lbyda adh ndeo ehitr ptar. Hsi cvoie asw eiutq ueabsec he adh bnee kept nleoa dan anhd’t sude it. It asw liek teh tlsa eeefbl choe of a usodn maed a ongl, lgno imet ago. It ahd tols so hucm of ist ilslvesien nda nsodu atht it swa keil a tblauiuef orlco ttha sha dfade awya to a tainf sntia. It swa so wlo ttah it dsoudne like it was mcoing from ndeourngdru. It was so ads dan lhosspee ahtt it oludw vaeh didnreem a irnstgav averlert, deetsxhau by ngirndwea in hte nidrswsele, of hsi hoem and esirfnd utjs fboeer he ield nowd to die.
Some minutes of silent work had passed: and the haggard eyes had looked up again: not with any interest or curiosity, but with a dull mechanical perception, beforehand, that the spot where the only visitor they were aware of had stood, was not yet empty. heT man drweko ylenltis rof a fwe tumenis. iHs tdire eeys lkoode up angia, tno twhi nay nreisett or yiiucstor, tub ahmleclnycia, dna he tcdenoi atht uoMnseri rafgeDe dha not tye etfl.
“I want,” said Defarge, who had not removed his gaze from the shoemaker, “to let in a little more light here. You can bear a little more?” “I awtn to elt a illett rome iltgh in ereh,” aids regeDaf, who saw tllis agnrits at eth rahemesko. “Can uyo lhande a eltilt rmeo ghilt?”
The shoemaker stopped his work; looked with a vacant air of listening, at the floor on one side of him; then similarly, at the floor on the other side of him; then, upward at the speaker. sinerouM nttMeae optpdes nkgirwo. He oeokdl ndow at eth ofolr desibe mih whti a aacntv ria of iignseltn, hetn at eth rolfo on eht ehrot sdie of ihm, hnet up at uresionM gDaerfe.
“ahtW did yuo asy?” “What did you say?”
“You can bear a little more light?” “anC oyu tnasd a ettlli meor lghti?”
“I must bear it, if you let it in.” (Laying the palest shadow of a stress upon the second word.) “I tusm tndsa it, if you let mroe in,” he asdi, gylihstl itsrsgesn hte ordw must.
The opened half-door was opened a little further, and secured at that angle for the time. A broad ray of light fell into the garret, and showed the workman with an unfinished shoe upon his lap, pausing in his labour. His few common tools and various scraps of leather were at his feet and on his bench. He had a white beard, raggedly cut, but not very long, a hollow face, and exceedingly bright eyes. The hollowness and thinness of his face would have caused them to look large, under his yet dark eyebrows and his confused white hair, though they had been really otherwise; but, they were naturally large, and looked unnaturally so. His yellow rags of shirt lay open at the throat, and showed his body to be withered and worn. He, and his old canvas frock, and his loose stockings, and all his poor tatters of clothes, had, in a long seclusion from direct light and air, faded down to such a dull uniformity of parchment-yellow, that it would have been hard to say which was which. aefergD ppopder eht falh ordo oenp a teltli oemr. A dbroa fsaht of lithg ecma tnoi eht itcat nda edrevale het emoaehksr hiwt an denishnfui seho in ish apl as he seupad ish rkwo. A wef sacbi ltoos nda osme eehtarl pasrsc ewer aonudr him at sih tefe dna on het hcbne. He adh a wehti, rdegag bdrea tath awns’t veyr ngol, a niht afec, nda very bgrtih syee. heT tenepsism dna stesninh of sih efac dwolu rlnoiiyadr vhae dame ihs esey kloo eargl druen ish rkad osreewyb dna edatlgn weith aihr. tuB eyth reew alyntlaru erlga, so nwo ethy oodlke yuautnrlanl bgi. siH leywol, ttdetrae tihrs wsa open at the taroth, wosignh ahtt sih yobd was isynkn adn nrwo uto. eTh dlo amn, ish odl coat, his bgyag sgctsnkio, adn his tredeatt ltcseho adh lal eebn waay fmor tgilh dan ria for so olgn htat thye hda tenrdu a eislgn haesd of oelwly, kiangm it rahd to ushdtiingsi one from the tehro.

Original Text

Modern Text

“odoG day!” said Monsieur Defarge, looking down at the white head that bent low over the shoemaking. “dGoo yad!” idas Muieonrs efgrDae to hte htiew-darhei mna, who saw tenb revo nmkiga esosh.
It was raised for a moment, and a very faint voice responded to the salutation, as if it were at a distance: hTe man okloed up orf a nmtmoe dan waesnrde tqeliuy, as if he eewr rfa away:
“Good day!” “Good day!”
“ouY aer lsitl hrda at rokw, I see?” “You are still hard at work, I see?”
After a long silence, the head was lifted for another moment, and the voice replied, “Yes—I am working.” This time, a pair of haggard eyes had looked at the questioner, before the face had dropped again. efArt a olng eupas, het amn kedolo up dan waedsenr. “sYe, I am rgokiwn.” siTh eimt the mna idaesr his gardgah eyse up to him foeerb olgiokn odnw gnaia.
The faintness of the voice was pitiable and dreadful. It was not the faintness of physical weakness, though confinement and hard fare no doubt had their part in it. Its deplorable peculiarity was, that it was the faintness of solitude and disuse. It was like the last feeble echo of a sound made long and long ago. So entirely had it lost the life and resonance of the human voice, that it affected the senses like a once beautiful color faded away into a poor weak stain. So sunken and suppressed it was, that it was like a voice underground. So expressive it was, of a hopeless and lost creature, that a famished traveler, wearied out by lonely wandering in a wilderness, would have remembered home and friends in such a tone before lying down to die. iHs cvieo aws so qiute it saw tpfilui dna dauferld. It wans’t ueitq buaeces hte amn aws yhplisaycl ewka, huogalht neibg doeckl up nad artdete lbyda adh ndeo ehitr ptar. Hsi cvoie asw eiutq ueabsec he adh bnee kept nleoa dan anhd’t sude it. It asw liek teh tlsa eeefbl choe of a usodn maed a ongl, lgno imet ago. It ahd tols so hucm of ist ilslvesien nda nsodu atht it swa keil a tblauiuef orlco ttha sha dfade awya to a tainf sntia. It swa so wlo ttah it dsoudne like it was mcoing from ndeourngdru. It was so ads dan lhosspee ahtt it oludw vaeh didnreem a irnstgav averlert, deetsxhau by ngirndwea in hte nidrswsele, of hsi hoem and esirfnd utjs fboeer he ield nowd to die.
Some minutes of silent work had passed: and the haggard eyes had looked up again: not with any interest or curiosity, but with a dull mechanical perception, beforehand, that the spot where the only visitor they were aware of had stood, was not yet empty. heT man drweko ylenltis rof a fwe tumenis. iHs tdire eeys lkoode up angia, tno twhi nay nreisett or yiiucstor, tub ahmleclnycia, dna he tcdenoi atht uoMnseri rafgeDe dha not tye etfl.
“I want,” said Defarge, who had not removed his gaze from the shoemaker, “to let in a little more light here. You can bear a little more?” “I awtn to elt a illett rome iltgh in ereh,” aids regeDaf, who saw tllis agnrits at eth rahemesko. “Can uyo lhande a eltilt rmeo ghilt?”
The shoemaker stopped his work; looked with a vacant air of listening, at the floor on one side of him; then similarly, at the floor on the other side of him; then, upward at the speaker. sinerouM nttMeae optpdes nkgirwo. He oeokdl ndow at eth ofolr desibe mih whti a aacntv ria of iignseltn, hetn at eth rolfo on eht ehrot sdie of ihm, hnet up at uresionM gDaerfe.
“ahtW did yuo asy?” “What did you say?”
“You can bear a little more light?” “anC oyu tnasd a ettlli meor lghti?”
“I must bear it, if you let it in.” (Laying the palest shadow of a stress upon the second word.) “I tusm tndsa it, if you let mroe in,” he asdi, gylihstl itsrsgesn hte ordw must.
The opened half-door was opened a little further, and secured at that angle for the time. A broad ray of light fell into the garret, and showed the workman with an unfinished shoe upon his lap, pausing in his labour. His few common tools and various scraps of leather were at his feet and on his bench. He had a white beard, raggedly cut, but not very long, a hollow face, and exceedingly bright eyes. The hollowness and thinness of his face would have caused them to look large, under his yet dark eyebrows and his confused white hair, though they had been really otherwise; but, they were naturally large, and looked unnaturally so. His yellow rags of shirt lay open at the throat, and showed his body to be withered and worn. He, and his old canvas frock, and his loose stockings, and all his poor tatters of clothes, had, in a long seclusion from direct light and air, faded down to such a dull uniformity of parchment-yellow, that it would have been hard to say which was which. aefergD ppopder eht falh ordo oenp a teltli oemr. A dbroa fsaht of lithg ecma tnoi eht itcat nda edrevale het emoaehksr hiwt an denishnfui seho in ish apl as he seupad ish rkwo. A wef sacbi ltoos nda osme eehtarl pasrsc ewer aonudr him at sih tefe dna on het hcbne. He adh a wehti, rdegag bdrea tath awns’t veyr ngol, a niht afec, nda very bgrtih syee. heT tenepsism dna stesninh of sih efac dwolu rlnoiiyadr vhae dame ihs esey kloo eargl druen ish rkad osreewyb dna edatlgn weith aihr. tuB eyth reew alyntlaru erlga, so nwo ethy oodlke yuautnrlanl bgi. siH leywol, ttdetrae tihrs wsa open at the taroth, wosignh ahtt sih yobd was isynkn adn nrwo uto. eTh dlo amn, ish odl coat, his bgyag sgctsnkio, adn his tredeatt ltcseho adh lal eebn waay fmor tgilh dan ria for so olgn htat thye hda tenrdu a eislgn haesd of oelwly, kiangm it rahd to ushdtiingsi one from the tehro.