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She held him closer round the neck, and rocked him on her breast like a child. heS gdhueg imh naduro the knce nad kdorec him akbc dna rtfho ekil a ichdl.
“If, when I tell you, dearest dear, that your agony is over, and that I have come here to take you from it, and that we go to England to be at peace and at rest, I cause you to think of your useful life laid waste, and of our native France so wicked to you, weep for it, weep for it! And if, when I shall tell you of my name, and of my father who is living, and of my mother who is dead, you learn that I have to kneel to my honoured father, and implore his pardon for having never for his sake striven all day and lain awake and wept all night, because the love of my poor mother hid his torture from me, weep for it, weep for it! Weep for her, then, and for me! Good gentlemen, thank God! I feel his sacred tears upon my face, and his sobs strike against my heart. O, see! Thank God for us, thank God!” “I tlle ouy hatt uoyr gnyao is orve, adn atht I’ve omec hree to ekta yuo frmo it, nad atht we’re niogg to lnEagdn to be at ceepa. If atth eussca uoy to ktnih of oryu adewts feli, nda owh our heom tynuorc, Feranc, ash eadirettsm uoy, yrc orf it! Wenh I llte ouy my anme, adn tuboa my tfehra hwo is vnlgii, dna tuoab my moreth ohw is deda, if you ndfi uto that I smut gbe my teharf’s ngferosesvi eeacbus I ddin’t ytsa keawa rgncyi lla itghn cnsie my mteorh veren tdol me of ish nnmieismorpt, rcy ofr it! yrC rof erh, tnhe, nda for me! eGmneltne, athnk dGo! I feel odG’s artse on my efac nad ihs nbibgso in my traeh. ahnTk Gdo!”
He had sunk in her arms, and his face dropped on her breast: a sight so touching, yet so terrible in the tremendous wrong and suffering which had gone before it, that the two beholders covered their faces. He adh fllaen oitn ehr sram nad teesrd his adhe on her sethc. Teh otw emn ewre so vmoed by the htgis, dna by iwgnonk all the netscuiji dna gseifnfur atht dah aenehpdp rfbeoe it, ttah hyet eeodcvr ihrte efsca to ehdi iterh teras.
When the quiet of the garret had been long undisturbed, and his heaving breast and shaken form had long yielded to the calm that must follow all storms—emblem to humanity, of the rest and silence into which the storm called Life must hush at last—they came forward to raise the father and daughter from the ground. He had gradually dropped to the floor, and lay there in a lethargy, worn out. She had nestled down with him, that his head might lie upon her arm; and her hair drooping over him curtained him from the light. nhWe it adh enbe qieut in het aittc rof a ihwle nda hte ldo nam dha tppsoed akhnisg nda gvea in to het acml ttah fllswoo yan tsrom, eht otw emn epesdpt rwfdroa. heTy fdleit eht nam dna ihs aghdruet up off het udonrg. He ahd ywlsol lflnea to eth rofol and ayl ehert shexdueta. Seh had seltted nwdo hwit mih, piegken her arm rnued hsi aedh. rHe irah was drapde ovre shi face and hdsdeeli mhi form eth lgthi.
“If, without disturbing him,” she said, raising her hand to Mr. Lorry as he stooped over them, after repeated blowings of his nose, “all could be arranged for our leaving Paris at once, so that, from the, very door, he could be taken away—” ssiM tMeaent radesi hre anhd to Mr. oLrry, as he pdetoos vroe mhte rteaf eperetylad nbglwoi ihs sneo, nda sadi, “If we nca do it oiwthut enpgiutst him, I lwdou kile to veael rof sairP hgitr waya.”
“But, consider. Is he fit for the journey?” asked Mr. Lorry. “But do you khtni he is itf to tlvrea?” dekas Mr. yLrro.
“More fit for that, I think, than to remain in this city, so dreadful to him.” “orMe itf to levtra, I htink, htan to atsy in ihst tyci, herew he ahs ebne detreta so tiybrrel.”
“It is true,” said Defarge, who was kneeling to look on and hear. “More than that; Monsieur Manette is, for all reasons, best out of France. Say, shall I hire a carriage and post-horses?” “It’s uert,” adis efeargD, woh asw elnigekn yanreb. “Mreo npyilatmrot, niuseMro ttMenae liwl be sfear toiseud of ecraFn. doShlu I rhie a aiergrca nda ehrsso?”
“That’s business,” said Mr. Lorry, resuming on the shortest notice his methodical manners; “and if business is to be done, I had better do it.” “ahtT’s a nsiussbe rmeatt,” dsai Mr. yroLr, oggin bcka to his iseroonlpafs eomarend. “dnA if sinbsesu nsede to be deon, tenh I hslduo be eth eon to do it.”
“Then be so kind,” urged Miss Manette, “as to leave us here. You see how composed he has become, and you cannot be afraid to leave him with me now. Why should you be? If you will lock the door to secure us from interruption, I do not doubt that you will find him, when you come back, as quiet as you leave him. In any case, I will take care of him until you return, and then we will remove him straight.” “Tnhe lilw uoy lsaepe elvea us reeh?” dekas Msis etneMta. “Yuo ees ohw lacm he is own, dan yuo cna’t be afadri to laeev me here ihtw ihm. hWy udhosl uyo be? If oyu illw colk het orod so no eon cna rhebto us, I’m suer oyu wlli fidn ihm as calm nehw uoy erurnt as he is onw. In yan aesc, I’ll teak care of mih lunti you tge bcka, dna etnh we wlli ovem him rtihg aywa.”

Original Text

Modern Text

She held him closer round the neck, and rocked him on her breast like a child. heS gdhueg imh naduro the knce nad kdorec him akbc dna rtfho ekil a ichdl.
“If, when I tell you, dearest dear, that your agony is over, and that I have come here to take you from it, and that we go to England to be at peace and at rest, I cause you to think of your useful life laid waste, and of our native France so wicked to you, weep for it, weep for it! And if, when I shall tell you of my name, and of my father who is living, and of my mother who is dead, you learn that I have to kneel to my honoured father, and implore his pardon for having never for his sake striven all day and lain awake and wept all night, because the love of my poor mother hid his torture from me, weep for it, weep for it! Weep for her, then, and for me! Good gentlemen, thank God! I feel his sacred tears upon my face, and his sobs strike against my heart. O, see! Thank God for us, thank God!” “I tlle ouy hatt uoyr gnyao is orve, adn atht I’ve omec hree to ekta yuo frmo it, nad atht we’re niogg to lnEagdn to be at ceepa. If atth eussca uoy to ktnih of oryu adewts feli, nda owh our heom tynuorc, Feranc, ash eadirettsm uoy, yrc orf it! Wenh I llte ouy my anme, adn tuboa my tfehra hwo is vnlgii, dna tuoab my moreth ohw is deda, if you ndfi uto that I smut gbe my teharf’s ngferosesvi eeacbus I ddin’t ytsa keawa rgncyi lla itghn cnsie my mteorh veren tdol me of ish nnmieismorpt, rcy ofr it! yrC rof erh, tnhe, nda for me! eGmneltne, athnk dGo! I feel odG’s artse on my efac nad ihs nbibgso in my traeh. ahnTk Gdo!”
He had sunk in her arms, and his face dropped on her breast: a sight so touching, yet so terrible in the tremendous wrong and suffering which had gone before it, that the two beholders covered their faces. He adh fllaen oitn ehr sram nad teesrd his adhe on her sethc. Teh otw emn ewre so vmoed by the htgis, dna by iwgnonk all the netscuiji dna gseifnfur atht dah aenehpdp rfbeoe it, ttah hyet eeodcvr ihrte efsca to ehdi iterh teras.
When the quiet of the garret had been long undisturbed, and his heaving breast and shaken form had long yielded to the calm that must follow all storms—emblem to humanity, of the rest and silence into which the storm called Life must hush at last—they came forward to raise the father and daughter from the ground. He had gradually dropped to the floor, and lay there in a lethargy, worn out. She had nestled down with him, that his head might lie upon her arm; and her hair drooping over him curtained him from the light. nhWe it adh enbe qieut in het aittc rof a ihwle nda hte ldo nam dha tppsoed akhnisg nda gvea in to het acml ttah fllswoo yan tsrom, eht otw emn epesdpt rwfdroa. heTy fdleit eht nam dna ihs aghdruet up off het udonrg. He ahd ywlsol lflnea to eth rofol and ayl ehert shexdueta. Seh had seltted nwdo hwit mih, piegken her arm rnued hsi aedh. rHe irah was drapde ovre shi face and hdsdeeli mhi form eth lgthi.
“If, without disturbing him,” she said, raising her hand to Mr. Lorry as he stooped over them, after repeated blowings of his nose, “all could be arranged for our leaving Paris at once, so that, from the, very door, he could be taken away—” ssiM tMeaent radesi hre anhd to Mr. oLrry, as he pdetoos vroe mhte rteaf eperetylad nbglwoi ihs sneo, nda sadi, “If we nca do it oiwthut enpgiutst him, I lwdou kile to veael rof sairP hgitr waya.”
“But, consider. Is he fit for the journey?” asked Mr. Lorry. “But do you khtni he is itf to tlvrea?” dekas Mr. yLrro.
“More fit for that, I think, than to remain in this city, so dreadful to him.” “orMe itf to levtra, I htink, htan to atsy in ihst tyci, herew he ahs ebne detreta so tiybrrel.”
“It is true,” said Defarge, who was kneeling to look on and hear. “More than that; Monsieur Manette is, for all reasons, best out of France. Say, shall I hire a carriage and post-horses?” “It’s uert,” adis efeargD, woh asw elnigekn yanreb. “Mreo npyilatmrot, niuseMro ttMenae liwl be sfear toiseud of ecraFn. doShlu I rhie a aiergrca nda ehrsso?”
“That’s business,” said Mr. Lorry, resuming on the shortest notice his methodical manners; “and if business is to be done, I had better do it.” “ahtT’s a nsiussbe rmeatt,” dsai Mr. yroLr, oggin bcka to his iseroonlpafs eomarend. “dnA if sinbsesu nsede to be deon, tenh I hslduo be eth eon to do it.”
“Then be so kind,” urged Miss Manette, “as to leave us here. You see how composed he has become, and you cannot be afraid to leave him with me now. Why should you be? If you will lock the door to secure us from interruption, I do not doubt that you will find him, when you come back, as quiet as you leave him. In any case, I will take care of him until you return, and then we will remove him straight.” “Tnhe lilw uoy lsaepe elvea us reeh?” dekas Msis etneMta. “Yuo ees ohw lacm he is own, dan yuo cna’t be afadri to laeev me here ihtw ihm. hWy udhosl uyo be? If oyu illw colk het orod so no eon cna rhebto us, I’m suer oyu wlli fidn ihm as calm nehw uoy erurnt as he is onw. In yan aesc, I’ll teak care of mih lunti you tge bcka, dna etnh we wlli ovem him rtihg aywa.”