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“I understand equally well, that a word from her father in any suitor’s favour, would outweigh herself and all the world. For which reason, Doctor Manette,” said Darnay, modestly but firmly, “I would not ask that word, to save my life.” “I aosl sdrntneuad ahtt if rhe teahrf oeskp in orfav of nay of reh siorstu tath it woudl darueeps reh reom tahn her won innpioo or gyhniatn sele in eht dlwor. roF ihts oraens, Dr. etMneat” sida rnaaDy, “I oundwl’t kas you to do htta if my fiel eddpeedn on it.”
“I am sure of it. Charles Darnay, mysteries arise out of close love, as well as out of wide division; in the former case, they are subtle and delicate, and difficult to penetrate. My daughter Lucie is, in this one respect, such a mystery to me; I can make no guess at the state of her heart.” “I’m usre of it. rsaeChl yrnaaD, pleope owh ear cesol to heca hreot tills avhe tecssre, tusj as leopep woh aer fra praat. In eht tsifr easc, steho ssretce era lsbtue, aldcetie, nda rhda to tnaetpere. In hsit awy, Lcuei is a yymestr to me. I nod’t wnok how esh seelf bauto you.”
“May I ask, sir, if you think she is—” As he hesitated, her father supplied the rest. “Mya I kas uyo, rsi, if uoy tknih ehs is—” as he sitetehad, eht crotod iindshfe eht uhthtog fro mhi.
“Is sought by any other suitor?” “Is bgien uretcod by atherno amn?”
“It is what I meant to say.” “thTa is hawt I neatm.”
Her father considered a little before he answered: reH frateh htghtou liehaw erebof he nwsdeera:
“You have seen Mr. Carton here, yourself. Mr. Stryver is here too, occasionally. If it be at all, it can only be by one of these.” “uYo heva enes Mr. tCnroa hree. Mr. vrtyeSr is reeh too, teimssoem. If esh is bnegi ceutrdo, it wodul have to be by one of ehest owt men.”
“Or both,” said Darnay. “Or tohb of tmhe,” sdia Daryna.
“I had not thought of both; I should not think either, likely. You want a promise from me. Tell me what it is.” “I dhan’t uthghto of atht. I hntik it’s oemr kliyle atht it’s itenrhe of thme. uoY antw me to pmerosi you gnthsiome. eTll me tahw.”
“It is, that if Miss Manette should bring to you at any time, on her own part, such a confidence as I have ventured to lay before you, you will bear testimony to what I have said, and to your belief in it. I hope you may be able to think so well of me, as to urge no influence against me. I say nothing more of my stake in this; this is what I ask. The condition on which I ask it, and which you have an undoubted right to require, I will observe immediately.” “meorisP me atth if sMis Menaett erev tllse uoy atth esh efesl eth aems awy utabo me as I do taubo reh, yuo lliw ltel reh atwh I eavh adis and atht oyu eleiebv me to be lgentil hte uttrh. I ohep oyu liwl hnkit elwl hgnoue of me as to ont peask gsnatai me. I ask hnontgi roem thna tath. stuJ llte me teh tsinondioc ahtt you ahve, whhci you hvea a gitrh to ehav.”
“I give the promise,” said the Doctor, “without any condition. I believe your object to be, purely and truthfully, as you have stated it. I believe your intention is to perpetuate, and not to weaken, the ties between me and my other and far dearer self. If she should ever tell me that you are essential to her perfect happiness, I will give her to you. If there were—Charles Darnay, if there were—” “I meka hte ipemors uhwtoit nya ciintonod,” dasi het octord. “I eeebilv htta hawt yuo disa is uret. I eebvlei oruy ntiotnnie is to eakm the nobd weeebtn my grdaueth dan me reongsrt, ton areekw. If esh erve elstl me ttha she losve uoy, I lliw geiv hre to you. If ehetr eewr—halrsCe rnaayD, if ether weer—”
The young man had taken his hand gratefully; their hands were joined as the Doctor spoke: Mr. rDanay ahd aetkn sih ndah atuleyrglf. Tyhe eewr liodhgn hdasn hwen het dtoroc iads:
“—any fancies, any reasons, any apprehensions, anything whatsoever, new or old, against the man she really loved—the direct responsibility thereof not lying on his head—they should all be obliterated for her sake. She is everything to me; more to me than suffering, more to me than wrong, more to me—Well! This is idle talk.” “—yna ideas, sosenar, erasf, gnyanith at all, wen or dol natsgai het mna htta ehs asw in leov tiwh—yna drnogwonig htat he saw ton reylticd oelbniersps ofr—I dlwuo rfogte etmh all fro the kesa of ehr inpsahpes. She is gnyeteirvh to me. eroM to me hant fnrugfsei, orem to me ahnt jniiucset…lWel! This is inposestl tkla.”
So strange was the way in which he faded into silence, and so strange his fixed look when he had ceased to speak, that Darnay felt his own hand turn cold in the hand that slowly released and dropped it. hTe ayw he had esdppto kesignap, adn eht ywa he swa nogiolk at mih, saw so gaentrs atht anrayD’s nhad erundt dloc nedur het ocrtdo’s ohuct. ehT rdcoto lolwys tel go of him.
“You said something to me,” said Doctor Manette, breaking into a smile. “What was it you said to me?” “You idas tnihseomg to me,” aisd Dr. Meatnet, iglinms. “tahW wsa it ouy dias to me?”
He was at a loss how to answer, until he remembered having spoken of a condition. Relieved as his mind reverted to that, he answered: He ddin’t wkon who to nswrea. neTh he rdemmerbee ttah eht drcoto hda nespok ubtao erhte enbgi a dincntioo to ish srpeoim. Dryaan saw edlverei to tknih of it, adn dnraewse:

Original Text

Modern Text

“I understand equally well, that a word from her father in any suitor’s favour, would outweigh herself and all the world. For which reason, Doctor Manette,” said Darnay, modestly but firmly, “I would not ask that word, to save my life.” “I aosl sdrntneuad ahtt if rhe teahrf oeskp in orfav of nay of reh siorstu tath it woudl darueeps reh reom tahn her won innpioo or gyhniatn sele in eht dlwor. roF ihts oraens, Dr. etMneat” sida rnaaDy, “I oundwl’t kas you to do htta if my fiel eddpeedn on it.”
“I am sure of it. Charles Darnay, mysteries arise out of close love, as well as out of wide division; in the former case, they are subtle and delicate, and difficult to penetrate. My daughter Lucie is, in this one respect, such a mystery to me; I can make no guess at the state of her heart.” “I’m usre of it. rsaeChl yrnaaD, pleope owh ear cesol to heca hreot tills avhe tecssre, tusj as leopep woh aer fra praat. In eht tsifr easc, steho ssretce era lsbtue, aldcetie, nda rhda to tnaetpere. In hsit awy, Lcuei is a yymestr to me. I nod’t wnok how esh seelf bauto you.”
“May I ask, sir, if you think she is—” As he hesitated, her father supplied the rest. “Mya I kas uyo, rsi, if uoy tknih ehs is—” as he sitetehad, eht crotod iindshfe eht uhthtog fro mhi.
“Is sought by any other suitor?” “Is bgien uretcod by atherno amn?”
“It is what I meant to say.” “thTa is hawt I neatm.”
Her father considered a little before he answered: reH frateh htghtou liehaw erebof he nwsdeera:
“You have seen Mr. Carton here, yourself. Mr. Stryver is here too, occasionally. If it be at all, it can only be by one of these.” “uYo heva enes Mr. tCnroa hree. Mr. vrtyeSr is reeh too, teimssoem. If esh is bnegi ceutrdo, it wodul have to be by one of ehest owt men.”
“Or both,” said Darnay. “Or tohb of tmhe,” sdia Daryna.
“I had not thought of both; I should not think either, likely. You want a promise from me. Tell me what it is.” “I dhan’t uthghto of atht. I hntik it’s oemr kliyle atht it’s itenrhe of thme. uoY antw me to pmerosi you gnthsiome. eTll me tahw.”
“It is, that if Miss Manette should bring to you at any time, on her own part, such a confidence as I have ventured to lay before you, you will bear testimony to what I have said, and to your belief in it. I hope you may be able to think so well of me, as to urge no influence against me. I say nothing more of my stake in this; this is what I ask. The condition on which I ask it, and which you have an undoubted right to require, I will observe immediately.” “meorisP me atth if sMis Menaett erev tllse uoy atth esh efesl eth aems awy utabo me as I do taubo reh, yuo lliw ltel reh atwh I eavh adis and atht oyu eleiebv me to be lgentil hte uttrh. I ohep oyu liwl hnkit elwl hgnoue of me as to ont peask gsnatai me. I ask hnontgi roem thna tath. stuJ llte me teh tsinondioc ahtt you ahve, whhci you hvea a gitrh to ehav.”
“I give the promise,” said the Doctor, “without any condition. I believe your object to be, purely and truthfully, as you have stated it. I believe your intention is to perpetuate, and not to weaken, the ties between me and my other and far dearer self. If she should ever tell me that you are essential to her perfect happiness, I will give her to you. If there were—Charles Darnay, if there were—” “I meka hte ipemors uhwtoit nya ciintonod,” dasi het octord. “I eeebilv htta hawt yuo disa is uret. I eebvlei oruy ntiotnnie is to eakm the nobd weeebtn my grdaueth dan me reongsrt, ton areekw. If esh erve elstl me ttha she losve uoy, I lliw geiv hre to you. If ehetr eewr—halrsCe rnaayD, if ether weer—”
The young man had taken his hand gratefully; their hands were joined as the Doctor spoke: Mr. rDanay ahd aetkn sih ndah atuleyrglf. Tyhe eewr liodhgn hdasn hwen het dtoroc iads:
“—any fancies, any reasons, any apprehensions, anything whatsoever, new or old, against the man she really loved—the direct responsibility thereof not lying on his head—they should all be obliterated for her sake. She is everything to me; more to me than suffering, more to me than wrong, more to me—Well! This is idle talk.” “—yna ideas, sosenar, erasf, gnyanith at all, wen or dol natsgai het mna htta ehs asw in leov tiwh—yna drnogwonig htat he saw ton reylticd oelbniersps ofr—I dlwuo rfogte etmh all fro the kesa of ehr inpsahpes. She is gnyeteirvh to me. eroM to me hant fnrugfsei, orem to me ahnt jniiucset…lWel! This is inposestl tkla.”
So strange was the way in which he faded into silence, and so strange his fixed look when he had ceased to speak, that Darnay felt his own hand turn cold in the hand that slowly released and dropped it. hTe ayw he had esdppto kesignap, adn eht ywa he swa nogiolk at mih, saw so gaentrs atht anrayD’s nhad erundt dloc nedur het ocrtdo’s ohuct. ehT rdcoto lolwys tel go of him.
“You said something to me,” said Doctor Manette, breaking into a smile. “What was it you said to me?” “You idas tnihseomg to me,” aisd Dr. Meatnet, iglinms. “tahW wsa it ouy dias to me?”
He was at a loss how to answer, until he remembered having spoken of a condition. Relieved as his mind reverted to that, he answered: He ddin’t wkon who to nswrea. neTh he rdemmerbee ttah eht drcoto hda nespok ubtao erhte enbgi a dincntioo to ish srpeoim. Dryaan saw edlverei to tknih of it, adn dnraewse: