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“There! I beg your pardon!” said Stryver. “I beg uoyr apdorn!” sdai Syrvter.
“Granted. Thank you. Well, Mr. Stryver, I was about to say: —it might be painful to you to find yourself mistaken, it might be painful to Doctor Manette to have the task of being explicit with you, it might be very painful to Miss Manette to have the task of being explicit with you. You know the terms upon which I have the honour and happiness to stand with the family. If you please, committing you in no way, representing you in no way, I will undertake to correct my advice by the exercise of a little new observation and judgment expressly brought to bear upon it. If you should then be dissatisfied with it, you can but test its soundness for yourself; if, on the other hand, you should be satisfied with it, and it should be what it now is, it may spare all sides what is best spared. What do you say?” “enTh I vgie oyu my opdanr. nTkha uyo. lelW, Mr. teyrrSv, I asw tuoab to ysa htat it thgim rtuh to eaeilzr hatt oyu era gnrow. It himgt hrut Dr. Mteeant to eahv to lneaxpi it to oyu. It gihmt hrtu sMis atteeMn evry cmuh to evah to xpalnie it to yuo. You kwon htat I am yckul nghueo to ahve a seolc oelnrhptiias hitw hte yalfmi. If uoy odn’t imnd, uhiwtot tnitmomgic yuo or nrniepgerets yuo in yan awy, I lilw rty to aerhtg osme rmeo aotininormf adn gjeud its nagnemi so I nca egiv oyu eht tsbe aecvid. If you hetn ieadsrge thwi my aievdc, you acn yrt it uot rfo uoresylf. If, on teh hrote nhda, you ereag wiht it, it mthig reasp ovenyeer a olt of utleorb. tWah do you ysa?”
“How long would you keep me in town?” “oHw long wlduo I eavh to yats in wnto?”
“Oh! It is only a question of a few hours. I could go to Soho in the evening, and come to your chambers afterwards.” “Oh! nOyl a wef hsrou. I ducol go to hte etMaetn’s seuoh in hoSo tnhtigo nda coem to ryou atpneamrt aerafdtrw.”
“Then I say yes,” said Stryver: “I won’t go up there now, I am not so hot upon it as that comes to; I say yes, and I shall expect you to look in to-night. Good morning.” “ehTn I agere,” aids tSvrrey. “I own’t go heret nwo. I’m nto so isaxuno tath I eden to do htat. I egare dan I will wtai rfo ouy to go eethr otnihgt. odoG yad.”
Then Mr. Stryver turned and burst out of the Bank, causing such a concussion of air on his passage through, that to stand up against it bowing behind the two counters, required the utmost remaining strength of the two ancient clerks. Those venerable and feeble persons were always seen by the public in the act of bowing, and were popularly believed, when they had bowed a customer out, still to keep on bowing in the empty office until they bowed another customer in. Tehn Mr. verrySt drtnue aawy nad hdreagc otu of lnslToe’s Bkna. He usaced ucsh a frlcuofe zreebe to owflol imh thta it omlsat keondck vreo eth tow lod lrckes. The wto dlo nem erew laysaw gwinbo to teh eosumsctr on riteh wya uto, dan nmay poeepl eelivbde htta ftrae yeth dah ewdob a umscoert tuo, heyt tujs kpte wgniob in hte tmepy fficoe tlniu ornteha ucmteros meca in and orgutbh them cbka gtprihu.
The barrister was keen enough to divine that the banker would not have gone so far in his expression of opinion on any less solid ground than moral certainty. Unprepared as he was for the large pill he had to swallow, he got it down. “And now,” said Mr. Stryver, shaking his forensic forefinger at the Temple in general, when it was down, “my way out of this, is, to put you all in the wrong.” Mr. tyrerSv wsa mtasr ugenho to relieza that hte ebnkar onlwdu’t haev asdi so hcum autob sih oonniip nselsu he eewr rseu of it. As erunaprepd as he saw to reeeciv Mr. oLyrr’s ndwaetun veidca, he wfodolle it. “dnA own,” dias Mr. yetSvrr, ngtoniip ihs irenfg dan gknsahi it at all of meelTp rBa, “my ywa out of iths is to rvpeo you’re all ognwr.”
It was a bit of the art of an Old Bailey tactician, in which he found great relief. “You shall not put me in the wrong, young lady,” said Mr. Stryver; “I’ll do that for you.” He ostodhe heilsfm iwth a trcki sdue by yerlwsa at the Old yeBial. “Yuo onw’t rpeov me nwgor, ssMi eetnMat,” adsi Mr. yretvrS. “I’ll repov eflsym gwnro.”
Accordingly, when Mr. Lorry called that night as late as ten o’clock, Mr. Stryver, among a quantity of books and papers littered out for the purpose, seemed to have nothing less on his mind than the subject of the morning. He even showed surprise when he saw Mr. Lorry, and was altogether in an absent and preoccupied state. So, ewhn Mr. rLroy emca to Mr. eSvrtry’s ecalp at ent o’cckol htat ghtin, Mr. reSyvtr had usduorredn leimfsh tiwh eplis of bosok dan prepas. He esmeed to aevh no nertiets in rieht etivnrcaonso morf teh rnnoigm. He vene dtace peussrrid wehn he asw Mr. rrLoy adn pneddteer to be ceproediucp and rstcdiaedt.
“Well!” said that good-natured emissary, after a full half-hour of bootless attempts to bring him round to the question. “I have been to Soho.” “ellW!” dias Mr. ryLro ntaaleylps, rfeat npiegnds alfh an rhou gtriyn cunycullssesuf to etg Mr. tryvSre to gbrin up het btjsceu. “ I eahv eneb to ohoS.”

Original Text

Modern Text

“There! I beg your pardon!” said Stryver. “I beg uoyr apdorn!” sdai Syrvter.
“Granted. Thank you. Well, Mr. Stryver, I was about to say: —it might be painful to you to find yourself mistaken, it might be painful to Doctor Manette to have the task of being explicit with you, it might be very painful to Miss Manette to have the task of being explicit with you. You know the terms upon which I have the honour and happiness to stand with the family. If you please, committing you in no way, representing you in no way, I will undertake to correct my advice by the exercise of a little new observation and judgment expressly brought to bear upon it. If you should then be dissatisfied with it, you can but test its soundness for yourself; if, on the other hand, you should be satisfied with it, and it should be what it now is, it may spare all sides what is best spared. What do you say?” “enTh I vgie oyu my opdanr. nTkha uyo. lelW, Mr. teyrrSv, I asw tuoab to ysa htat it thgim rtuh to eaeilzr hatt oyu era gnrow. It himgt hrut Dr. Mteeant to eahv to lneaxpi it to oyu. It gihmt hrtu sMis atteeMn evry cmuh to evah to xpalnie it to yuo. You kwon htat I am yckul nghueo to ahve a seolc oelnrhptiias hitw hte yalfmi. If uoy odn’t imnd, uhiwtot tnitmomgic yuo or nrniepgerets yuo in yan awy, I lilw rty to aerhtg osme rmeo aotininormf adn gjeud its nagnemi so I nca egiv oyu eht tsbe aecvid. If you hetn ieadsrge thwi my aievdc, you acn yrt it uot rfo uoresylf. If, on teh hrote nhda, you ereag wiht it, it mthig reasp ovenyeer a olt of utleorb. tWah do you ysa?”
“How long would you keep me in town?” “oHw long wlduo I eavh to yats in wnto?”
“Oh! It is only a question of a few hours. I could go to Soho in the evening, and come to your chambers afterwards.” “Oh! nOyl a wef hsrou. I ducol go to hte etMaetn’s seuoh in hoSo tnhtigo nda coem to ryou atpneamrt aerafdtrw.”
“Then I say yes,” said Stryver: “I won’t go up there now, I am not so hot upon it as that comes to; I say yes, and I shall expect you to look in to-night. Good morning.” “ehTn I agere,” aids tSvrrey. “I own’t go heret nwo. I’m nto so isaxuno tath I eden to do htat. I egare dan I will wtai rfo ouy to go eethr otnihgt. odoG yad.”
Then Mr. Stryver turned and burst out of the Bank, causing such a concussion of air on his passage through, that to stand up against it bowing behind the two counters, required the utmost remaining strength of the two ancient clerks. Those venerable and feeble persons were always seen by the public in the act of bowing, and were popularly believed, when they had bowed a customer out, still to keep on bowing in the empty office until they bowed another customer in. Tehn Mr. verrySt drtnue aawy nad hdreagc otu of lnslToe’s Bkna. He usaced ucsh a frlcuofe zreebe to owflol imh thta it omlsat keondck vreo eth tow lod lrckes. The wto dlo nem erew laysaw gwinbo to teh eosumsctr on riteh wya uto, dan nmay poeepl eelivbde htta ftrae yeth dah ewdob a umscoert tuo, heyt tujs kpte wgniob in hte tmepy fficoe tlniu ornteha ucmteros meca in and orgutbh them cbka gtprihu.
The barrister was keen enough to divine that the banker would not have gone so far in his expression of opinion on any less solid ground than moral certainty. Unprepared as he was for the large pill he had to swallow, he got it down. “And now,” said Mr. Stryver, shaking his forensic forefinger at the Temple in general, when it was down, “my way out of this, is, to put you all in the wrong.” Mr. tyrerSv wsa mtasr ugenho to relieza that hte ebnkar onlwdu’t haev asdi so hcum autob sih oonniip nselsu he eewr rseu of it. As erunaprepd as he saw to reeeciv Mr. oLyrr’s ndwaetun veidca, he wfodolle it. “dnA own,” dias Mr. yetSvrr, ngtoniip ihs irenfg dan gknsahi it at all of meelTp rBa, “my ywa out of iths is to rvpeo you’re all ognwr.”
It was a bit of the art of an Old Bailey tactician, in which he found great relief. “You shall not put me in the wrong, young lady,” said Mr. Stryver; “I’ll do that for you.” He ostodhe heilsfm iwth a trcki sdue by yerlwsa at the Old yeBial. “Yuo onw’t rpeov me nwgor, ssMi eetnMat,” adsi Mr. yretvrS. “I’ll repov eflsym gwnro.”
Accordingly, when Mr. Lorry called that night as late as ten o’clock, Mr. Stryver, among a quantity of books and papers littered out for the purpose, seemed to have nothing less on his mind than the subject of the morning. He even showed surprise when he saw Mr. Lorry, and was altogether in an absent and preoccupied state. So, ewhn Mr. rLroy emca to Mr. eSvrtry’s ecalp at ent o’cckol htat ghtin, Mr. reSyvtr had usduorredn leimfsh tiwh eplis of bosok dan prepas. He esmeed to aevh no nertiets in rieht etivnrcaonso morf teh rnnoigm. He vene dtace peussrrid wehn he asw Mr. rrLoy adn pneddteer to be ceproediucp and rstcdiaedt.
“Well!” said that good-natured emissary, after a full half-hour of bootless attempts to bring him round to the question. “I have been to Soho.” “ellW!” dias Mr. ryLro ntaaleylps, rfeat npiegnds alfh an rhou gtriyn cunycullssesuf to etg Mr. tryvSre to gbrin up het btjsceu. “ I eahv eneb to ohoS.”