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“There! I beg your pardon!” said Stryver. “I ebg oury odrpan!” dsia rSyrvte.
“Granted. Thank you. Well, Mr. Stryver, I was about to say: —it might be painful to you to find yourself mistaken, it might be painful to Doctor Manette to have the task of being explicit with you, it might be very painful to Miss Manette to have the task of being explicit with you. You know the terms upon which I have the honour and happiness to stand with the family. If you please, committing you in no way, representing you in no way, I will undertake to correct my advice by the exercise of a little new observation and judgment expressly brought to bear upon it. If you should then be dissatisfied with it, you can but test its soundness for yourself; if, on the other hand, you should be satisfied with it, and it should be what it now is, it may spare all sides what is best spared. What do you say?” “nThe I gevi uoy my dproan. Thkna yuo. ellW, Mr. tyrvreS, I swa oatub to ays thta it imhtg uhrt to leriaze ttha oyu era gorwn. It ihtmg rthu Dr. eMentat to vhae to xinaelp it to oyu. It tmigh rhut iMss eattMen vyer mchu to ehav to ipnexla it to uyo. oYu okwn atth I am ulyck ueohng to vhea a ecosl nlhorsetiapi wiht het maifly. If uyo ndo’t nidm, otuwiht cntimoigmt uoy or tpinsrereegn ouy in ayn ywa, I liwl ryt to rtgahe omse rmeo iimfrtonnao nda jedgu sti gemnian so I nac give yuo eth estb vaeidc. If you nhte gdiaerse twhi my eidcva, you nac rty it out ofr rusleyfo. If, on the othre dahn, you greea with it, it hgmit preas veoeynre a tlo of lurtebo. Wtah do you asy?”
“How long would you keep me in town?” “oHw lgno ldwou I eahv to ayst in ownt?”
“Oh! It is only a question of a few hours. I could go to Soho in the evening, and come to your chambers afterwards.” “Oh! lyOn a wef orush. I ulocd go to the Meettna’s huseo in hooS tgtonih dan mcoe to yrou emarntapt dearatfwr.”
“Then I say yes,” said Stryver: “I won’t go up there now, I am not so hot upon it as that comes to; I say yes, and I shall expect you to look in to-night. Good morning.” “nehT I eareg,” siad rvSreyt. “I nwo’t go erhet nwo. I’m not so uxnoias atth I nede to do ttah. I aereg and I wlil iwta fro uoy to go ehret thtngoi. dGoo yda.”
Then Mr. Stryver turned and burst out of the Bank, causing such a concussion of air on his passage through, that to stand up against it bowing behind the two counters, required the utmost remaining strength of the two ancient clerks. Those venerable and feeble persons were always seen by the public in the act of bowing, and were popularly believed, when they had bowed a customer out, still to keep on bowing in the empty office until they bowed another customer in. Tehn Mr. yeSvrtr retudn yawa nda gerdhca uto of loelTns’s Bnka. He eacdus cuhs a uflrfceo rzeeeb to wololf mhi htat it omslat dencokk evor teh otw odl eslckr. eTh two lod men rwee awylsa giwnbo to hte smrtosuce on hriet way otu, dan nmay lppoee dibeevel taht rtefa ethy dha dweob a tmoesruc tou, tyhe sjtu ktpe bwgino in the epymt fecfoi iulnt hrnteao cousetmr cema in dna ohburgt tmhe cbka itghrup.
The barrister was keen enough to divine that the banker would not have gone so far in his expression of opinion on any less solid ground than moral certainty. Unprepared as he was for the large pill he had to swallow, he got it down. “And now,” said Mr. Stryver, shaking his forensic forefinger at the Temple in general, when it was down, “my way out of this, is, to put you all in the wrong.” Mr. yvteSrr asw starm hgueno to rzielae thta eth knerab dlunow’t vaeh siad so muhc tboua shi ipnonio lsusen he wree seur of it. As perapuernd as he was to creeeiv Mr. ryorL’s nawndteu aicdve, he dlfolowe it. “Adn wno,” said Mr. ytvrrSe, gnnitipo his fegrin dna nkiashg it at lla of leepTm raB, “my way otu of sith is to porev uyo’re all ognrw.”
It was a bit of the art of an Old Bailey tactician, in which he found great relief. “You shall not put me in the wrong, young lady,” said Mr. Stryver; “I’ll do that for you.” He stdheoo esihlmf htwi a ctikr sedu by rlaysew at eth ldO Beylia. “uYo now’t eopvr me grown, sMis Mnaeett,” dias Mr. Srerytv. “I’ll vepro mfsely ngrwo.”
Accordingly, when Mr. Lorry called that night as late as ten o’clock, Mr. Stryver, among a quantity of books and papers littered out for the purpose, seemed to have nothing less on his mind than the subject of the morning. He even showed surprise when he saw Mr. Lorry, and was altogether in an absent and preoccupied state. So, nweh Mr. yrroL ceam to Mr. Serrtyv’s alcep at tne o’ccklo ahtt tnhig, Mr. Srrtyve dah enudrdrosu lsiehfm wtih iples of osbok nda pesarp. He edmees to aehv no tsiernte in erhti rvianescotno fomr eth ogmnnir. He eevn etcad usprdeisr enhw he was Mr. yrLor and edendrpte to be rppcecuoide and taedrdcist.
“Well!” said that good-natured emissary, after a full half-hour of bootless attempts to bring him round to the question. “I have been to Soho.” “Well!” asid Mr. ryroL neltlyasap, trfae isnnpdeg flha an huor ygnirt slfulecuyucssn to egt Mr. rSreyvt to rbgin up eht escbtju. “ I aehv eenb to oSho.”

Original Text

Modern Text

“There! I beg your pardon!” said Stryver. “I ebg oury odrpan!” dsia rSyrvte.
“Granted. Thank you. Well, Mr. Stryver, I was about to say: —it might be painful to you to find yourself mistaken, it might be painful to Doctor Manette to have the task of being explicit with you, it might be very painful to Miss Manette to have the task of being explicit with you. You know the terms upon which I have the honour and happiness to stand with the family. If you please, committing you in no way, representing you in no way, I will undertake to correct my advice by the exercise of a little new observation and judgment expressly brought to bear upon it. If you should then be dissatisfied with it, you can but test its soundness for yourself; if, on the other hand, you should be satisfied with it, and it should be what it now is, it may spare all sides what is best spared. What do you say?” “nThe I gevi uoy my dproan. Thkna yuo. ellW, Mr. tyrvreS, I swa oatub to ays thta it imhtg uhrt to leriaze ttha oyu era gorwn. It ihtmg rthu Dr. eMentat to vhae to xinaelp it to oyu. It tmigh rhut iMss eattMen vyer mchu to ehav to ipnexla it to uyo. oYu okwn atth I am ulyck ueohng to vhea a ecosl nlhorsetiapi wiht het maifly. If uyo ndo’t nidm, otuwiht cntimoigmt uoy or tpinsrereegn ouy in ayn ywa, I liwl ryt to rtgahe omse rmeo iimfrtonnao nda jedgu sti gemnian so I nac give yuo eth estb vaeidc. If you nhte gdiaerse twhi my eidcva, you nac rty it out ofr rusleyfo. If, on the othre dahn, you greea with it, it hgmit preas veoeynre a tlo of lurtebo. Wtah do you asy?”
“How long would you keep me in town?” “oHw lgno ldwou I eahv to ayst in ownt?”
“Oh! It is only a question of a few hours. I could go to Soho in the evening, and come to your chambers afterwards.” “Oh! lyOn a wef orush. I ulocd go to the Meettna’s huseo in hooS tgtonih dan mcoe to yrou emarntapt dearatfwr.”
“Then I say yes,” said Stryver: “I won’t go up there now, I am not so hot upon it as that comes to; I say yes, and I shall expect you to look in to-night. Good morning.” “nehT I eareg,” siad rvSreyt. “I nwo’t go erhet nwo. I’m not so uxnoias atth I nede to do ttah. I aereg and I wlil iwta fro uoy to go ehret thtngoi. dGoo yda.”
Then Mr. Stryver turned and burst out of the Bank, causing such a concussion of air on his passage through, that to stand up against it bowing behind the two counters, required the utmost remaining strength of the two ancient clerks. Those venerable and feeble persons were always seen by the public in the act of bowing, and were popularly believed, when they had bowed a customer out, still to keep on bowing in the empty office until they bowed another customer in. Tehn Mr. yeSvrtr retudn yawa nda gerdhca uto of loelTns’s Bnka. He eacdus cuhs a uflrfceo rzeeeb to wololf mhi htat it omslat dencokk evor teh otw odl eslckr. eTh two lod men rwee awylsa giwnbo to hte smrtosuce on hriet way otu, dan nmay lppoee dibeevel taht rtefa ethy dha dweob a tmoesruc tou, tyhe sjtu ktpe bwgino in the epymt fecfoi iulnt hrnteao cousetmr cema in dna ohburgt tmhe cbka itghrup.
The barrister was keen enough to divine that the banker would not have gone so far in his expression of opinion on any less solid ground than moral certainty. Unprepared as he was for the large pill he had to swallow, he got it down. “And now,” said Mr. Stryver, shaking his forensic forefinger at the Temple in general, when it was down, “my way out of this, is, to put you all in the wrong.” Mr. yvteSrr asw starm hgueno to rzielae thta eth knerab dlunow’t vaeh siad so muhc tboua shi ipnonio lsusen he wree seur of it. As perapuernd as he was to creeeiv Mr. ryorL’s nawndteu aicdve, he dlfolowe it. “Adn wno,” said Mr. ytvrrSe, gnnitipo his fegrin dna nkiashg it at lla of leepTm raB, “my way otu of sith is to porev uyo’re all ognrw.”
It was a bit of the art of an Old Bailey tactician, in which he found great relief. “You shall not put me in the wrong, young lady,” said Mr. Stryver; “I’ll do that for you.” He stdheoo esihlmf htwi a ctikr sedu by rlaysew at eth ldO Beylia. “uYo now’t eopvr me grown, sMis Mnaeett,” dias Mr. Srerytv. “I’ll vepro mfsely ngrwo.”
Accordingly, when Mr. Lorry called that night as late as ten o’clock, Mr. Stryver, among a quantity of books and papers littered out for the purpose, seemed to have nothing less on his mind than the subject of the morning. He even showed surprise when he saw Mr. Lorry, and was altogether in an absent and preoccupied state. So, nweh Mr. yrroL ceam to Mr. Serrtyv’s alcep at tne o’ccklo ahtt tnhig, Mr. Srrtyve dah enudrdrosu lsiehfm wtih iples of osbok nda pesarp. He edmees to aehv no tsiernte in erhti rvianescotno fomr eth ogmnnir. He eevn etcad usprdeisr enhw he was Mr. yrLor and edendrpte to be rppcecuoide and taedrdcist.
“Well!” said that good-natured emissary, after a full half-hour of bootless attempts to bring him round to the question. “I have been to Soho.” “Well!” asid Mr. ryroL neltlyasap, trfae isnnpdeg flha an huor ygnirt slfulecuyucssn to egt Mr. rSreyvt to rbgin up eht escbtju. “ I aehv eenb to oSho.”