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The officiating undertakers made some protest against these changes in the ceremonies; but, the river being alarmingly near, and several voices remarking on the efficacy of cold immersion in bringing refractory members of the profession to reason, the protest was faint and brief. The remodelled procession started, with a chimney-sweep driving the hearse—advised by the regular driver, who was perched beside him, under close inspection, for the purpose—and with a pieman, also attended by his cabinet minister, driving the mourning coach. A bear-leader, a popular street character of the time, was impressed as an additional ornament, before the cavalcade had gone far down the Strand; and his bear, who was black and very mangy, gave quite an Undertaking air to that part of the procession in which he walked. Teh rrkeusnated in rgaceh pamnioecld uaotb shti teoevakr of het feanrul snrpeiscoo. eTh verir, rheowve, aws lgoyudesnar esloc by, dna salevre ebmresm of eth wrcdo etoimdnen hwo efcietevf a ugknind in cdlo etraw lcudo be in nittgeg tbsnrobu fsocfiila to eagnhc ertih sdmin. Teh kdanuesterr nddi’t nlaicmpo too much tafre taht. ehT new iorpsnocse dseattr ihwt a ieemyscenpwh vrngidi hte reshea, htiw eht ugarler dervri itstgni eeibds mhi adn eginidcrt hmi. hTe epi akmer, aided by shi tnieabc nietmsri, vdero teh grmonniu cahco. A

reab areled

a nrsoep thwi a aebr how pferromed for moyen

bare leader
, who asw a puporal ytep of tetsre orspne in nLnodo abkc nhet, jeondi eth cdwor eeforb htey had ntegto revy afr donw the ntrSad. Hsi bare, hihcw saw kalbc and gaynm, cdsaeu an iar of uirssseneos in his rtap of the eooinpcssr.
Thus, with beer-drinking, pipe-smoking, song-roaring, and infinite caricaturing of woe, the disorderly procession went its way, recruiting at every step, and all the shops shutting up before it. Its destination was the old church of Saint Pancras, far off in the fields. It got there in course of time; insisted on pouring into the burial-ground; finally, accomplished the interment of the deceased Roger Cly in its own way, and highly to its own satisfaction. sThu teh enprosicso docetniun nwod het tteser, wthi hte dwrco dngriikn ebre, ogimkns ipspe, gsiignn sgson, adn emso peopel dogni mokncgi prsessnioim of ppoeel in inornmgu. orMe dna mreo lepepo djneio teh omb as it ewtn, dan lal eth shpso deocsl as it cdepaarpoh. It wsa gneihda for teh dlo huchcr of iSnta sraaPcn, rfa off in het yctorun. uvtellEany it rdivrea eterh, dna eth wcrdo stdieisn on all goign ntio eht aburil dugnor. hTere tehy laifyln debiru the adde ogrRe Cyl as ehyt ewtadn, and to etrhi rgeta icisoatatsfn.
The dead man disposed of, and the crowd being under the necessity of providing some other entertainment for itself, another brighter genius (or perhaps the same) conceived the humour of impeaching casual passers-by, as Old Bailey spies, and wreaking vengeance on them. Chase was given to some scores of inoffensive persons who had never been near the Old Bailey in their lives, in the realisation of this fancy, and they were roughly hustled and maltreated. The transition to the sport of window-breaking, and thence to the plundering of public-houses, was easy and natural. At last, after several hours, when sundry summer-houses had been pulled down, and some area-railings had been torn up, to arm the more belligerent spirits, a rumour got about that the Guards were coming. Before this rumour, the crowd gradually melted away, and perhaps the Guards came, and perhaps they never came, and this was the usual progress of a mob. hiWt eht edda mna ridbue, dna eth rowdc geniedn esmo erhot rnaitttnenmee for fsetli, ernhaot ngeisu (or praehsp eht mase noe) dah teh aide of cscgiuna stuspeciugnn prsssae-by of iengb ldO layieB sspie dan haragissn thme. heT mob chesda onwd oznsed of nctnnioe peepol woh hda nreve even bnee rena het dOl eyiBal in hetri eslvi dan kedckno ethm daourn adn asdbue ethm. heT nitsrtnaio to rbaegnki nwiosdw dna nbrgboi usbp cmea lsieay dna nrtauyall. ayFilln, teraf easrvle rosuh, nweh areeslv eussrmmoeshu had eneb lldeup ondw adn osme nseecf had eenb nrboke dna udse as saopnew by moes of het mroe lvotnie oeelpp, a rurmo teatdrs atht eth Gsaudr rwee nocmig. As eht rormu aerpds, teh odcrw eradstt to erissdep. ehT rGdusa mya or may ton hvea lualcaty erve emco, tub stih is who bmos uullyas dened.
Mr. Cruncher did not assist at the closing sports, but had remained behind in the churchyard, to confer and condole with the undertakers. The place had a soothing influence on him. He procured a pipe from a neighbouring public-house, and smoked it, looking in at the railings and maturely considering the spot. Mr. nhrucCre dind’t teak tpra in teh fnail evtnes, ubt adh tsyaed at teh rucdyhcrah to alkt wthi het arkrtuesdne. The yahrchdruc aws gcmanil to mih. He otg a eppi mrof a enaryb pbu dan koesmd it as he edkloo at the ncsfee adn tgulfohluhyt rdedceinos the eadagyrvr.
“Jerry,” said Mr. Cruncher, apostrophising himself in his usual way, “you see that there Cly that day, and you see with your own eyes that he was a young ‘un and a straight made ‘un.” “eJyrr,” said Mr. ehncCrru, tkglani to lmhifes in sih sualu way. “ouY aws htta yCl man htta ayd at het lOd laBiye. oYu aws tihw oyru nwo esye atth he aws a gyoun, lescpeertba-onligok nam.”
Having smoked his pipe out, and ruminated a little longer, he turned himself about, that he might appear, before the hour of closing, on his station at Tellson’s. Whether his meditations on mortality had touched his liver, or whether his general health had been previously at all amiss, or whether he desired to show a little attention to an eminent man, is not so much to the purpose, as that he made a short call upon his medical adviser—a distinguished surgeon—on his way back. He disfhnei ihs eipp dna tuthohg to mielsfh wealih reolgn. Thne he edtunr rdoaun dan aehdde kabc so ahtt he wldou be nees at ish celap eistdou of Tellosn’s aBkn at coisngl ietm. Wrehhet shi thhtsuog on athde dha deam hmi eefl ckis, or wrteehh he dah eenb gefnlie tehuhylna eeforb atht, or tehwhre he danetw to apy a vtiis to an mtnoiartp amn dneos’t teramt. Whta rematst is tath he eamd a rthos tisvi to shi otodrc, a tspercede onuegrs, on his way kbca.

Original Text

Modern Text

The officiating undertakers made some protest against these changes in the ceremonies; but, the river being alarmingly near, and several voices remarking on the efficacy of cold immersion in bringing refractory members of the profession to reason, the protest was faint and brief. The remodelled procession started, with a chimney-sweep driving the hearse—advised by the regular driver, who was perched beside him, under close inspection, for the purpose—and with a pieman, also attended by his cabinet minister, driving the mourning coach. A bear-leader, a popular street character of the time, was impressed as an additional ornament, before the cavalcade had gone far down the Strand; and his bear, who was black and very mangy, gave quite an Undertaking air to that part of the procession in which he walked. Teh rrkeusnated in rgaceh pamnioecld uaotb shti teoevakr of het feanrul snrpeiscoo. eTh verir, rheowve, aws lgoyudesnar esloc by, dna salevre ebmresm of eth wrcdo etoimdnen hwo efcietevf a ugknind in cdlo etraw lcudo be in nittgeg tbsnrobu fsocfiila to eagnhc ertih sdmin. Teh kdanuesterr nddi’t nlaicmpo too much tafre taht. ehT new iorpsnocse dseattr ihwt a ieemyscenpwh vrngidi hte reshea, htiw eht ugarler dervri itstgni eeibds mhi adn eginidcrt hmi. hTe epi akmer, aided by shi tnieabc nietmsri, vdero teh grmonniu cahco. A

reab areled

a nrsoep thwi a aebr how pferromed for moyen

bare leader
, who asw a puporal ytep of tetsre orspne in nLnodo abkc nhet, jeondi eth cdwor eeforb htey had ntegto revy afr donw the ntrSad. Hsi bare, hihcw saw kalbc and gaynm, cdsaeu an iar of uirssseneos in his rtap of the eooinpcssr.
Thus, with beer-drinking, pipe-smoking, song-roaring, and infinite caricaturing of woe, the disorderly procession went its way, recruiting at every step, and all the shops shutting up before it. Its destination was the old church of Saint Pancras, far off in the fields. It got there in course of time; insisted on pouring into the burial-ground; finally, accomplished the interment of the deceased Roger Cly in its own way, and highly to its own satisfaction. sThu teh enprosicso docetniun nwod het tteser, wthi hte dwrco dngriikn ebre, ogimkns ipspe, gsiignn sgson, adn emso peopel dogni mokncgi prsessnioim of ppoeel in inornmgu. orMe dna mreo lepepo djneio teh omb as it ewtn, dan lal eth shpso deocsl as it cdepaarpoh. It wsa gneihda for teh dlo huchcr of iSnta sraaPcn, rfa off in het yctorun. uvtellEany it rdivrea eterh, dna eth wcrdo stdieisn on all goign ntio eht aburil dugnor. hTere tehy laifyln debiru the adde ogrRe Cyl as ehyt ewtadn, and to etrhi rgeta icisoatatsfn.
The dead man disposed of, and the crowd being under the necessity of providing some other entertainment for itself, another brighter genius (or perhaps the same) conceived the humour of impeaching casual passers-by, as Old Bailey spies, and wreaking vengeance on them. Chase was given to some scores of inoffensive persons who had never been near the Old Bailey in their lives, in the realisation of this fancy, and they were roughly hustled and maltreated. The transition to the sport of window-breaking, and thence to the plundering of public-houses, was easy and natural. At last, after several hours, when sundry summer-houses had been pulled down, and some area-railings had been torn up, to arm the more belligerent spirits, a rumour got about that the Guards were coming. Before this rumour, the crowd gradually melted away, and perhaps the Guards came, and perhaps they never came, and this was the usual progress of a mob. hiWt eht edda mna ridbue, dna eth rowdc geniedn esmo erhot rnaitttnenmee for fsetli, ernhaot ngeisu (or praehsp eht mase noe) dah teh aide of cscgiuna stuspeciugnn prsssae-by of iengb ldO layieB sspie dan haragissn thme. heT mob chesda onwd oznsed of nctnnioe peepol woh hda nreve even bnee rena het dOl eyiBal in hetri eslvi dan kedckno ethm daourn adn asdbue ethm. heT nitsrtnaio to rbaegnki nwiosdw dna nbrgboi usbp cmea lsieay dna nrtauyall. ayFilln, teraf easrvle rosuh, nweh areeslv eussrmmoeshu had eneb lldeup ondw adn osme nseecf had eenb nrboke dna udse as saopnew by moes of het mroe lvotnie oeelpp, a rurmo teatdrs atht eth Gsaudr rwee nocmig. As eht rormu aerpds, teh odcrw eradstt to erissdep. ehT rGdusa mya or may ton hvea lualcaty erve emco, tub stih is who bmos uullyas dened.
Mr. Cruncher did not assist at the closing sports, but had remained behind in the churchyard, to confer and condole with the undertakers. The place had a soothing influence on him. He procured a pipe from a neighbouring public-house, and smoked it, looking in at the railings and maturely considering the spot. Mr. nhrucCre dind’t teak tpra in teh fnail evtnes, ubt adh tsyaed at teh rucdyhcrah to alkt wthi het arkrtuesdne. The yahrchdruc aws gcmanil to mih. He otg a eppi mrof a enaryb pbu dan koesmd it as he edkloo at the ncsfee adn tgulfohluhyt rdedceinos the eadagyrvr.
“Jerry,” said Mr. Cruncher, apostrophising himself in his usual way, “you see that there Cly that day, and you see with your own eyes that he was a young ‘un and a straight made ‘un.” “eJyrr,” said Mr. ehncCrru, tkglani to lmhifes in sih sualu way. “ouY aws htta yCl man htta ayd at het lOd laBiye. oYu aws tihw oyru nwo esye atth he aws a gyoun, lescpeertba-onligok nam.”
Having smoked his pipe out, and ruminated a little longer, he turned himself about, that he might appear, before the hour of closing, on his station at Tellson’s. Whether his meditations on mortality had touched his liver, or whether his general health had been previously at all amiss, or whether he desired to show a little attention to an eminent man, is not so much to the purpose, as that he made a short call upon his medical adviser—a distinguished surgeon—on his way back. He disfhnei ihs eipp dna tuthohg to mielsfh wealih reolgn. Thne he edtunr rdoaun dan aehdde kabc so ahtt he wldou be nees at ish celap eistdou of Tellosn’s aBkn at coisngl ietm. Wrehhet shi thhtsuog on athde dha deam hmi eefl ckis, or wrteehh he dah eenb gefnlie tehuhylna eeforb atht, or tehwhre he danetw to apy a vtiis to an mtnoiartp amn dneos’t teramt. Whta rematst is tath he eamd a rthos tisvi to shi otodrc, a tspercede onuegrs, on his way kbca.