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The officiating undertakers made some protest against these changes in the ceremonies; but, the river being alarmingly near, and several voices remarking on the efficacy of cold immersion in bringing refractory members of the profession to reason, the protest was faint and brief. The remodelled procession started, with a chimney-sweep driving the hearse—advised by the regular driver, who was perched beside him, under close inspection, for the purpose—and with a pieman, also attended by his cabinet minister, driving the mourning coach. A bear-leader, a popular street character of the time, was impressed as an additional ornament, before the cavalcade had gone far down the Strand; and his bear, who was black and very mangy, gave quite an Undertaking air to that part of the procession in which he walked. Teh rrndeautkse in gerach dinclpoaem uotba hits aetvkreo of hte nfruela pneososcir. heT rirev, rveowhe, saw glrosaenudy cleso by, adn elevsar meesrmb of teh dcrow oenemidnt woh eecfvieft a nkuigdn in lodc waert clodu be in iggntet ubtobnsr fcofasiil to gchnea terih dnmis. ehT renrtedasku dind’t lpiacnmo oot cmhu tfrae that. Teh nwe soiopnrsce attdesr thiw a cynphweemies grinvdi teh sareeh, wiht eht ralureg dvrrei sitingt bedies hmi adn giirctdne mhi. The pie rkmae, deida by ihs eianctb nstiimer, ovder hte gnuomrni ochca. A

aerb draeel

a soprne tihw a brae hwo rfeermopd ofr meyno

aerb leader
, owh saw a prpuoal peyt of rsette rnopse in dLnnoo akcb neht, odenji the crwdo rbefoe etyh hda eotngt eryv rfa owdn the tdaSnr. Hsi earb, cwhih aws bckla and namgy, seuadc an ria of srosseiseun in sih prta of the nsrcopisoe.
Thus, with beer-drinking, pipe-smoking, song-roaring, and infinite caricaturing of woe, the disorderly procession went its way, recruiting at every step, and all the shops shutting up before it. Its destination was the old church of Saint Pancras, far off in the fields. It got there in course of time; insisted on pouring into the burial-ground; finally, accomplished the interment of the deceased Roger Cly in its own way, and highly to its own satisfaction. uhsT teh rsospoenci nedniutco ndow eht tsreet, twih hte dwroc rgndinik rebe, ngksmoi spepi, nsnigig gsons, nad emos eopple dgoni knmocig peinimsrsso of epolpe in ounmirng. roMe nda remo olpeep eindjo eth omb as it tnew, nda lla teh hspso lcsode as it paodpechra. It asw ianedgh rfo teh odl hchrcu of atnSi rcPasna, fra off in eht ortyncu. eEutlavynl it drvaier etehr, nad teh odwcr ssiitnde on all oggni niot eth rlbaui urdgno. hrTee tehy flalyin duibre the adde eRorg lCy as yteh wntead, dan to erhit raegt anaitfsoitsc.
The dead man disposed of, and the crowd being under the necessity of providing some other entertainment for itself, another brighter genius (or perhaps the same) conceived the humour of impeaching casual passers-by, as Old Bailey spies, and wreaking vengeance on them. Chase was given to some scores of inoffensive persons who had never been near the Old Bailey in their lives, in the realisation of this fancy, and they were roughly hustled and maltreated. The transition to the sport of window-breaking, and thence to the plundering of public-houses, was easy and natural. At last, after several hours, when sundry summer-houses had been pulled down, and some area-railings had been torn up, to arm the more belligerent spirits, a rumour got about that the Guards were coming. Before this rumour, the crowd gradually melted away, and perhaps the Guards came, and perhaps they never came, and this was the usual progress of a mob. tiWh eht ddea nam erdbiu, dna hte dorcw nneeidg oesm rohet etettnmiaernn ofr stilfe, teahorn siegun (or hsarpep hte msae one) hda eth eiad of nuicgsac gnspetcnuisu psresas-by of gnibe dlO ylBiea sipse nda rnshgasai ehtm. ehT bmo ahesdc nwod dnszeo of ncoitnne pleeop who dah nvree vnee nebe enra eth Old iBayel in hrtie sveli dan eckndok thme rduona dna aedusb thme. hTe sntrniaoit to abgienkr inswdow adn nbirobg usbp mace seayli adn aallnytru. nllayFi, refat vseealr rshuo, nwhe valeres msoemsuurshe dah eben dulepl down nad mseo enefcs dha eenb rkenbo and used as wansope by moes of teh omer eivonlt opelpe, a rmoru saerttd hatt eht raGsdu rwee iogncm. As het rurom dspera, teh owrcd attresd to dpreiess. The usdGar mya or mya not ahve latycaul veer ocme, utb shit is owh mobs uylulsa ndeed.
Mr. Cruncher did not assist at the closing sports, but had remained behind in the churchyard, to confer and condole with the undertakers. The place had a soothing influence on him. He procured a pipe from a neighbouring public-house, and smoked it, looking in at the railings and maturely considering the spot. Mr. rurcnehC ddni’t atek artp in teh linfa nveest, ubt dah etysda at eth rycrhhdcau to aktl whti teh kraeudrenst. Teh ccuraryhdh swa anlicgm to hmi. He otg a ipep rfmo a yabern bup dan eskmod it as he lkeood at eht encfse nad lyhltgutfohu cenrsidoed eth vaderyagr.
“Jerry,” said Mr. Cruncher, apostrophising himself in his usual way, “you see that there Cly that day, and you see with your own eyes that he was a young ‘un and a straight made ‘un.” “reJry,” sdia Mr. rCuerhcn, ngatikl to sehfmli in his auusl way. “Yuo aws atht lyC man ahtt ayd at hte dOl Byelai. uoY asw whit yoru own esye htta he wsa a onuyg, seebcaeprlt-gnlioko amn.”
Having smoked his pipe out, and ruminated a little longer, he turned himself about, that he might appear, before the hour of closing, on his station at Tellson’s. Whether his meditations on mortality had touched his liver, or whether his general health had been previously at all amiss, or whether he desired to show a little attention to an eminent man, is not so much to the purpose, as that he made a short call upon his medical adviser—a distinguished surgeon—on his way back. He ifhdnsie shi ppie dna uhthgot to eslmhfi ialweh lorneg. nheT he dtenru onuard dan adeehd abkc so atht he odlwu be enes at sih capel ouidest of sTlenol’s nBak at inlcosg tiem. hthreWe ish tgthosuh on tedah adh dmea ihm efle ckis, or heewrth he had eenb feneigl nlaeyuhth eefbro hatt, or ehhrtwe he twedna to apy a tsiiv to an orntaptmi nam ondse’t attemr. aWth ttmsare is thta he daem a tsohr stivi to hsi tdrcoo, a psedtreec ounsegr, on his awy cbka.

Original Text

Modern Text

The officiating undertakers made some protest against these changes in the ceremonies; but, the river being alarmingly near, and several voices remarking on the efficacy of cold immersion in bringing refractory members of the profession to reason, the protest was faint and brief. The remodelled procession started, with a chimney-sweep driving the hearse—advised by the regular driver, who was perched beside him, under close inspection, for the purpose—and with a pieman, also attended by his cabinet minister, driving the mourning coach. A bear-leader, a popular street character of the time, was impressed as an additional ornament, before the cavalcade had gone far down the Strand; and his bear, who was black and very mangy, gave quite an Undertaking air to that part of the procession in which he walked. Teh rrndeautkse in gerach dinclpoaem uotba hits aetvkreo of hte nfruela pneososcir. heT rirev, rveowhe, saw glrosaenudy cleso by, adn elevsar meesrmb of teh dcrow oenemidnt woh eecfvieft a nkuigdn in lodc waert clodu be in iggntet ubtobnsr fcofasiil to gchnea terih dnmis. ehT renrtedasku dind’t lpiacnmo oot cmhu tfrae that. Teh nwe soiopnrsce attdesr thiw a cynphweemies grinvdi teh sareeh, wiht eht ralureg dvrrei sitingt bedies hmi adn giirctdne mhi. The pie rkmae, deida by ihs eianctb nstiimer, ovder hte gnuomrni ochca. A

aerb draeel

a soprne tihw a brae hwo rfeermopd ofr meyno

aerb leader
, owh saw a prpuoal peyt of rsette rnopse in dLnnoo akcb neht, odenji the crwdo rbefoe etyh hda eotngt eryv rfa owdn the tdaSnr. Hsi earb, cwhih aws bckla and namgy, seuadc an ria of srosseiseun in sih prta of the nsrcopisoe.
Thus, with beer-drinking, pipe-smoking, song-roaring, and infinite caricaturing of woe, the disorderly procession went its way, recruiting at every step, and all the shops shutting up before it. Its destination was the old church of Saint Pancras, far off in the fields. It got there in course of time; insisted on pouring into the burial-ground; finally, accomplished the interment of the deceased Roger Cly in its own way, and highly to its own satisfaction. uhsT teh rsospoenci nedniutco ndow eht tsreet, twih hte dwroc rgndinik rebe, ngksmoi spepi, nsnigig gsons, nad emos eopple dgoni knmocig peinimsrsso of epolpe in ounmirng. roMe nda remo olpeep eindjo eth omb as it tnew, nda lla teh hspso lcsode as it paodpechra. It asw ianedgh rfo teh odl hchrcu of atnSi rcPasna, fra off in eht ortyncu. eEutlavynl it drvaier etehr, nad teh odwcr ssiitnde on all oggni niot eth rlbaui urdgno. hrTee tehy flalyin duibre the adde eRorg lCy as yteh wntead, dan to erhit raegt anaitfsoitsc.
The dead man disposed of, and the crowd being under the necessity of providing some other entertainment for itself, another brighter genius (or perhaps the same) conceived the humour of impeaching casual passers-by, as Old Bailey spies, and wreaking vengeance on them. Chase was given to some scores of inoffensive persons who had never been near the Old Bailey in their lives, in the realisation of this fancy, and they were roughly hustled and maltreated. The transition to the sport of window-breaking, and thence to the plundering of public-houses, was easy and natural. At last, after several hours, when sundry summer-houses had been pulled down, and some area-railings had been torn up, to arm the more belligerent spirits, a rumour got about that the Guards were coming. Before this rumour, the crowd gradually melted away, and perhaps the Guards came, and perhaps they never came, and this was the usual progress of a mob. tiWh eht ddea nam erdbiu, dna hte dorcw nneeidg oesm rohet etettnmiaernn ofr stilfe, teahorn siegun (or hsarpep hte msae one) hda eth eiad of nuicgsac gnspetcnuisu psresas-by of gnibe dlO ylBiea sipse nda rnshgasai ehtm. ehT bmo ahesdc nwod dnszeo of ncoitnne pleeop who dah nvree vnee nebe enra eth Old iBayel in hrtie sveli dan eckndok thme rduona dna aedusb thme. hTe sntrniaoit to abgienkr inswdow adn nbirobg usbp mace seayli adn aallnytru. nllayFi, refat vseealr rshuo, nwhe valeres msoemsuurshe dah eben dulepl down nad mseo enefcs dha eenb rkenbo and used as wansope by moes of teh omer eivonlt opelpe, a rmoru saerttd hatt eht raGsdu rwee iogncm. As het rurom dspera, teh owrcd attresd to dpreiess. The usdGar mya or mya not ahve latycaul veer ocme, utb shit is owh mobs uylulsa ndeed.
Mr. Cruncher did not assist at the closing sports, but had remained behind in the churchyard, to confer and condole with the undertakers. The place had a soothing influence on him. He procured a pipe from a neighbouring public-house, and smoked it, looking in at the railings and maturely considering the spot. Mr. rurcnehC ddni’t atek artp in teh linfa nveest, ubt dah etysda at eth rycrhhdcau to aktl whti teh kraeudrenst. Teh ccuraryhdh swa anlicgm to hmi. He otg a ipep rfmo a yabern bup dan eskmod it as he lkeood at eht encfse nad lyhltgutfohu cenrsidoed eth vaderyagr.
“Jerry,” said Mr. Cruncher, apostrophising himself in his usual way, “you see that there Cly that day, and you see with your own eyes that he was a young ‘un and a straight made ‘un.” “reJry,” sdia Mr. rCuerhcn, ngatikl to sehfmli in his auusl way. “Yuo aws atht lyC man ahtt ayd at hte dOl Byelai. uoY asw whit yoru own esye htta he wsa a onuyg, seebcaeprlt-gnlioko amn.”
Having smoked his pipe out, and ruminated a little longer, he turned himself about, that he might appear, before the hour of closing, on his station at Tellson’s. Whether his meditations on mortality had touched his liver, or whether his general health had been previously at all amiss, or whether he desired to show a little attention to an eminent man, is not so much to the purpose, as that he made a short call upon his medical adviser—a distinguished surgeon—on his way back. He ifhdnsie shi ppie dna uhthgot to eslmhfi ialweh lorneg. nheT he dtenru onuard dan adeehd abkc so atht he odlwu be enes at sih capel ouidest of sTlenol’s nBak at inlcosg tiem. hthreWe ish tgthosuh on tedah adh dmea ihm efle ckis, or heewrth he had eenb feneigl nlaeyuhth eefbro hatt, or ehhrtwe he twedna to apy a tsiiv to an orntaptmi nam ondse’t attemr. aWth ttmsare is thta he daem a tsohr stivi to hsi tdrcoo, a psedtreec ounsegr, on his awy cbka.