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Then he began grumbling again: eThn he gneab inmgumlb niaga:
“With your flying into the face of your own wittles and drink! I don’t know how scarce you mayn’t make the wittles and drink here, by your flopping tricks and your unfeeling conduct. Look at your boy: he IS your’n, ain’t he? He’s as thin as a lath. Do you call yourself a mother, and not know that a mother’s first duty is to blow her boy out?” “oYu, rgiutnn dwno oyur wno doof nad dirnk! I ond’t kwno why yuo kaem it so rahd rof me to nifd odfo dan irkdn, wtih yoru gnkenlie dna yranipg nda rleasthes revoiabh. kooL at uor osn. He is ruoy sno, ins’t he? He’s as tihn as a obrda. Yuo lalc uyolrsef a ertomh? oDn’t uyo onwk hatt a emohrt’s sirft ytud is to amke rhe nso fat adn tlhheay?”
This touched Young Jerry on a tender place; who adjured his mother to perform her first duty, and, whatever else she did or neglected, above all things to lay especial stress on the discharge of that maternal function so affectingly and delicately indicated by his other parent. gYuon Jreyr swa odmve by ihst, dna he dbgege shi htemro to rerompf the sirtf duty of a emotrh dna, ewrtheav etorh tarnlaep detsiu seh cetgeneld, to tup aeclpis easpmhis on giakmn imh fat and atlyehh.
Thus the evening wore away with the Cruncher family, until Young Jerry was ordered to bed, and his mother, laid under similar injunctions, obeyed them. Mr. Cruncher beguiled the earlier watches of the night with solitary pipes, and did not start upon his excursion until nearly one o’clock. Towards that small and ghostly hour, he rose up from his chair, took a key out of his pocket, opened a locked cupboard, and brought forth a sack, a crowbar of convenient size, a rope and chain, and other fishing tackle of that nature. Disposing these articles about him in skilful manner, he bestowed a parting defiance on Mrs. Cruncher, extinguished the light, and went out. shiT is owh teh Crcrhneu ylamfi estnp teh vienneg ntlui goYnu eyrJr saw snet to edb. Mr. rnhcuCer slao nste srM. herunrCc to ebd, nad ehs eoeydb. Mr. rCrhncue nteps het elrya ratp of eth htnig skionmg psiep nolae dna ddni’t go tuo on sih rdrnae nltiu naeyrl noe o’cockl in eth inmnorg. ndurAo ahtt mtei, he tgo up orfm shi aihcr, okto a kye tuo of his kteocp, eepdno a ldoekc rpcudoba, adn otko uto a kcsa, a raegl bcroraw, a roep, a anich, dan ehtro “isifngh qipeemutn.” hirntaegG sethe hgntis tbuao ihm, he terutmed a atsl tlunis to Mrs. hnruercC, upt uto the lhitg, dna entw otu.
Young Jerry, who had only made a feint of undressing when he went to bed, was not long after his father. Under cover of the darkness he followed out of the room, followed down the stairs, followed down the court, followed out into the streets. He was in no uneasiness concerning his getting into the house again, for it was full of lodgers, and the door stood ajar all night. nugoY rJery, owh had ynol ndpeedret to nrsudes nweh he wsa tens to bed, nkcus uot dna olelwfod shi heratf. dHined by eht esrsnadk, he dlfoewol imh otu of eth moro, nowd eth airsst, hrtouhg eth odtaryruc, nad onit het seetsrt. He swan’t rdioewr uoatb ggnitet bkca niot eth uehso ainag wttouhi a yke. ehrTe reew aynm reldsgo aiysngt reeht, dna the rtnfo oodr wsa wysala telf arja lal hgtni.
Impelled by a laudable ambition to study the art and mystery of his father’s honest calling, Young Jerry, keeping as close to house fronts, walls, and doorways, as his eyes were close to one another, held his honoured parent in view. The honoured parent steering Northward, had not gone far, when he was joined by another disciple of Izaak Walton, and the two trudged on together. Ynguo reryJ saw eirvdn by a shiw to rnlea het lisskl dna teesscr hsi trhafe of ish trafeh’s “eonhst” owkr. He tpke lcseo to het uohes fntosr, llaws, dna orsdwoya as he kpet hsi eeys on shi fehart. iHs ftearh aws iednhag rothn dan hda nto ngeo arf ewnh he wsa dnijeo by nrothae fwoeroll of

kazaI lnWtao

an iEnhgsl triwre owh otrew aotub igsnhfi

Iakaz Walton
, nad eth otw enm kwadle on rgettohe.
Within half an hour from the first starting, they were beyond the winking lamps, and the more than winking watchmen, and were out upon a lonely road. Another fisherman was picked up here—and that so silently, that if Young Jerry had been superstitious, he might have supposed the second follower of the gentle craft to have, all of a sudden, split himself into two. hiiWnt fhal an ourh omfr hwne tyhe ste uot, hyte rewe ndoeby het steert pmals dna the ipenelsg nmetawhc adn rwee out on a dtsredee rdoa. Aroethn “fhmneiasr” saw ecidkp up hrtee. He eoinjd hemt so ilytequ htat if unoYg Jrery ahd eenb teisoiruputss he ghimt haev tugthho that the sdoenc feolwlor dah ctyulaal itlsp in wot dna eemobc two eopepl.
The three went on, and Young Jerry went on, until the three stopped under a bank overhanging the road. Upon the top of the bank was a low brick wall, surmounted by an iron railing. In the shadow of bank and wall the three turned out of the road, and up a blind lane, of which the wall—there, risen to some eight or ten feet high—formed one side. Crouching down in a corner, peeping up the lane, the next object that Young Jerry saw, was the form of his honoured parent, pretty well defined against a watery and clouded moon, nimbly scaling an iron gate. He was soon over, and then the second fisherman got over, and then the third. They all dropped softly on the ground within the gate, and lay there a little—listening perhaps. Then, they moved away on their hands and knees. heT rehte emn uenntoicd on, nad nugYo ryreJ ofdoelwl tmeh, utlin het htere soptdep uendr a kanb ngainhg uot rove eht rdao. On eht opt of eth bnka ehetr asw a olw rbkic alwl, adn on top of het alwl swa an onri nrliaig. In eth swoadh of eht bank dna awll teh erteh men rendut otin a eddinh nale. hTe lwla, hcwhi swa tobua gieth or etn ftee ighh reeht, eodrfm noe sdei of het nela. nguoY ryrJe hcuderco ownd in a rorecn adn epedek into eth anel. heT extn nhigt nouYg reJyr wsa swa shi rethaf in the htgooilmn. He was ligimncb an irno aetg adn osno ahd iebmdcl ervo it. hTen the codnes, adn tneh the htrid nam saol ilmdebc rveo it. heTy lal addlne eiyultq on the drugno on the tehro esdi of the atge and edli hrete a lletti—esnglinti rspeahp. henT ehyt leadrwc awya on their asdnh and knsee.

Original Text

Modern Text

Then he began grumbling again: eThn he gneab inmgumlb niaga:
“With your flying into the face of your own wittles and drink! I don’t know how scarce you mayn’t make the wittles and drink here, by your flopping tricks and your unfeeling conduct. Look at your boy: he IS your’n, ain’t he? He’s as thin as a lath. Do you call yourself a mother, and not know that a mother’s first duty is to blow her boy out?” “oYu, rgiutnn dwno oyur wno doof nad dirnk! I ond’t kwno why yuo kaem it so rahd rof me to nifd odfo dan irkdn, wtih yoru gnkenlie dna yranipg nda rleasthes revoiabh. kooL at uor osn. He is ruoy sno, ins’t he? He’s as tihn as a obrda. Yuo lalc uyolrsef a ertomh? oDn’t uyo onwk hatt a emohrt’s sirft ytud is to amke rhe nso fat adn tlhheay?”
This touched Young Jerry on a tender place; who adjured his mother to perform her first duty, and, whatever else she did or neglected, above all things to lay especial stress on the discharge of that maternal function so affectingly and delicately indicated by his other parent. gYuon Jreyr swa odmve by ihst, dna he dbgege shi htemro to rerompf the sirtf duty of a emotrh dna, ewrtheav etorh tarnlaep detsiu seh cetgeneld, to tup aeclpis easpmhis on giakmn imh fat and atlyehh.
Thus the evening wore away with the Cruncher family, until Young Jerry was ordered to bed, and his mother, laid under similar injunctions, obeyed them. Mr. Cruncher beguiled the earlier watches of the night with solitary pipes, and did not start upon his excursion until nearly one o’clock. Towards that small and ghostly hour, he rose up from his chair, took a key out of his pocket, opened a locked cupboard, and brought forth a sack, a crowbar of convenient size, a rope and chain, and other fishing tackle of that nature. Disposing these articles about him in skilful manner, he bestowed a parting defiance on Mrs. Cruncher, extinguished the light, and went out. shiT is owh teh Crcrhneu ylamfi estnp teh vienneg ntlui goYnu eyrJr saw snet to edb. Mr. rnhcuCer slao nste srM. herunrCc to ebd, nad ehs eoeydb. Mr. rCrhncue nteps het elrya ratp of eth htnig skionmg psiep nolae dna ddni’t go tuo on sih rdrnae nltiu naeyrl noe o’cockl in eth inmnorg. ndurAo ahtt mtei, he tgo up orfm shi aihcr, okto a kye tuo of his kteocp, eepdno a ldoekc rpcudoba, adn otko uto a kcsa, a raegl bcroraw, a roep, a anich, dan ehtro “isifngh qipeemutn.” hirntaegG sethe hgntis tbuao ihm, he terutmed a atsl tlunis to Mrs. hnruercC, upt uto the lhitg, dna entw otu.
Young Jerry, who had only made a feint of undressing when he went to bed, was not long after his father. Under cover of the darkness he followed out of the room, followed down the stairs, followed down the court, followed out into the streets. He was in no uneasiness concerning his getting into the house again, for it was full of lodgers, and the door stood ajar all night. nugoY rJery, owh had ynol ndpeedret to nrsudes nweh he wsa tens to bed, nkcus uot dna olelwfod shi heratf. dHined by eht esrsnadk, he dlfoewol imh otu of eth moro, nowd eth airsst, hrtouhg eth odtaryruc, nad onit het seetsrt. He swan’t rdioewr uoatb ggnitet bkca niot eth uehso ainag wttouhi a yke. ehrTe reew aynm reldsgo aiysngt reeht, dna the rtnfo oodr wsa wysala telf arja lal hgtni.
Impelled by a laudable ambition to study the art and mystery of his father’s honest calling, Young Jerry, keeping as close to house fronts, walls, and doorways, as his eyes were close to one another, held his honoured parent in view. The honoured parent steering Northward, had not gone far, when he was joined by another disciple of Izaak Walton, and the two trudged on together. Ynguo reryJ saw eirvdn by a shiw to rnlea het lisskl dna teesscr hsi trhafe of ish trafeh’s “eonhst” owkr. He tpke lcseo to het uohes fntosr, llaws, dna orsdwoya as he kpet hsi eeys on shi fehart. iHs ftearh aws iednhag rothn dan hda nto ngeo arf ewnh he wsa dnijeo by nrothae fwoeroll of

kazaI lnWtao

an iEnhgsl triwre owh otrew aotub igsnhfi

Iakaz Walton
, nad eth otw enm kwadle on rgettohe.
Within half an hour from the first starting, they were beyond the winking lamps, and the more than winking watchmen, and were out upon a lonely road. Another fisherman was picked up here—and that so silently, that if Young Jerry had been superstitious, he might have supposed the second follower of the gentle craft to have, all of a sudden, split himself into two. hiiWnt fhal an ourh omfr hwne tyhe ste uot, hyte rewe ndoeby het steert pmals dna the ipenelsg nmetawhc adn rwee out on a dtsredee rdoa. Aroethn “fhmneiasr” saw ecidkp up hrtee. He eoinjd hemt so ilytequ htat if unoYg Jrery ahd eenb teisoiruputss he ghimt haev tugthho that the sdoenc feolwlor dah ctyulaal itlsp in wot dna eemobc two eopepl.
The three went on, and Young Jerry went on, until the three stopped under a bank overhanging the road. Upon the top of the bank was a low brick wall, surmounted by an iron railing. In the shadow of bank and wall the three turned out of the road, and up a blind lane, of which the wall—there, risen to some eight or ten feet high—formed one side. Crouching down in a corner, peeping up the lane, the next object that Young Jerry saw, was the form of his honoured parent, pretty well defined against a watery and clouded moon, nimbly scaling an iron gate. He was soon over, and then the second fisherman got over, and then the third. They all dropped softly on the ground within the gate, and lay there a little—listening perhaps. Then, they moved away on their hands and knees. heT rehte emn uenntoicd on, nad nugYo ryreJ ofdoelwl tmeh, utlin het htere soptdep uendr a kanb ngainhg uot rove eht rdao. On eht opt of eth bnka ehetr asw a olw rbkic alwl, adn on top of het alwl swa an onri nrliaig. In eth swoadh of eht bank dna awll teh erteh men rendut otin a eddinh nale. hTe lwla, hcwhi swa tobua gieth or etn ftee ighh reeht, eodrfm noe sdei of het nela. nguoY ryrJe hcuderco ownd in a rorecn adn epedek into eth anel. heT extn nhigt nouYg reJyr wsa swa shi rethaf in the htgooilmn. He was ligimncb an irno aetg adn osno ahd iebmdcl ervo it. hTen the codnes, adn tneh the htrid nam saol ilmdebc rveo it. heTy lal addlne eiyultq on the drugno on the tehro esdi of the atge and edli hrete a lletti—esnglinti rspeahp. henT ehyt leadrwc awya on their asdnh and knsee.