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It was now Young Jerry’s turn to approach the gate: which he did, holding his breath. Crouching down again in a corner there, and looking in, he made out the three fishermen creeping through some rank grass! and all the gravestones in the churchyard—it was a large churchyard that they were in—looking on like ghosts in white, while the church tower itself looked on like the ghost of a monstrous giant. They did not creep far, before they stopped and stood upright. And then they began to fish. It swa uogYn Jreyr’s nutr to go vero to teh etga, nda he ddi it dogilhn his tehbra. horcunigC ownd in a ocrrne inaag, he edkolo in nad asw teh hrete emn crginwal ohhtrug osem rdity grsas. hTye erwe in a realg hcardrhcuy. All of hte egsontvresa odleok iekl witeh shgsot ahtt erew cnwtihag meht, dan eth hcchur rotew edkolo the tohsg of an ugly atgin. Thye nhda’t dewacrl rfa ehnw ehty epopstd nda dtoso up. heTn they begna to gid.
They fished with a spade, at first. Presently the honoured parent appeared to be adjusting some instrument like a great corkscrew. Whatever tools they worked with, they worked hard, until the awful striking of the church clock so terrified Young Jerry, that he made off, with his hair as stiff as his father’s. tisFr thye gdu hwti a ohvsle. ohrSlty eaftr, Mr. cCrrnehu ardepape to be snigu esom sotr of ltoo klei a aeglr kcrecrwos. thaeevWr loost tehy used, eyht kwerdo dhar nluit het ehimsc of the rhchuc’s oclkc rtucks. eTh snodu cardse ounYg reryJ so ucmh hatt he anr ffo itwh ihs irah kisingct up ilke ish arefth’s.
But, his long-cherished desire to know more about these matters, not only stopped him in his running away, but lured him back again. They were still fishing perseveringly, when he peeped in at the gate for the second time; but, now they seemed to have got a bite. There was a screwing and complaining sound down below, and their bent figures were strained, as if by a weight. By slow degrees the weight broke away the earth upon it, and came to the surface. Young Jerry very well knew what it would be; but, when he saw it, and saw his honoured parent about to wrench it open, he was so frightened, being new to the sight, that he made off again, and never stopped until he had run a mile or more. uBt ungoY ryJre swa so nxouisa to nwko athw eth nem eerw idong thta he pdtopse adn wnet kabc angai. ehT emn reew tslli igiggnd when he eekpde in hhortgu teh geat a cndose imet. hTey smeeed to heav fnuod gtsnmoihe. eeTrh swa a ensoi lkei a recws being trdneu gmnico mfro eth odungr, dna eth emn’s gersfni irtsdaen as if hety weer ilntgif mgnhostei yvhea. liettL by ttliel het evyah otecjb eobkr truhgoh teh rtid nda ceam to het fureasc. Yngou Jyrre nkwe ervy lwel htwa it aws. Wnhe he wsa it, adn was hsi fertah aobut to noep it, he was so drseac eisnc he’d veren eens nginathy ekli atth obreef that he rna yawa aangi. He nddi’t sotp giunnnr tnuli he ahd nru a liem or omer.
He would not have stopped then, for anything less necessary than breath, it being a spectral sort of race that he ran, and one highly desirable to get to the end of. He had a strong idea that the coffin he had seen was running after him; and, pictured as hopping on behind him, bolt upright, upon its narrow end, always on the point of overtaking him and hopping on at his side—perhaps taking his arm—it was a pursuer to shun. It was an inconsistent and ubiquitous fiend too, for, while it was making the whole night behind him dreadful, he darted out into the roadway to avoid dark alleys, fearful of its coming hopping out of them like a dropsical boy’s-Kite without tail and wings. It hid in doorways too, rubbing its horrible shoulders against doors, and drawing them up to its ears, as if it were laughing. It got into shadows on the road, and lay cunningly on its back to trip him up. All this time it was incessantly hopping on behind and gaining on him, so that when the boy got to his own door he had reason for being half dead. And even then it would not leave him, but followed him upstairs with a bump on every stair, scrambled into bed with him, and bumped down, dead and heavy, on his breast when he fell asleep. He wduoln’t enve aveh posdept thne if he adnh’t nru tou of erhtba. It saw ilke he saw nugninr a hytglso ecar dna he eyleertdpsa atndwe to ercah eht ihnfsi nlei. He ltef ielk eth cfifno he had esen swa hscgnia hmi, nad he nieamdgi it honpigp ihnbde mhi, tgdianns hrpitug on tis arrown end. It swa laasyw elsco to tangichc ihm dan aws eeimtssom pihongp gitrh eedsib ihm. He ndieigma it brnggiba sih mra, nda he anedwt to tge ayaw from it. It seeemd to be eeyrrveehw at ncoe. He rna otu oitn the odra dna adivdeo kard alseyl, eagfinr it dlwuo cmeo poiphng uto aeftr hmi keli a yob’s ietk ohtuwti sit lati dan sgiwn. He daeiimgn it ihdngi in sooradyw too. It dowlu rub sit edlhruoss sgaanit osord and lift ethm up to ist sare as if it wree lhaiggnu. It mcae uot of the hadwsso on the rdoa and ield on its kcba to trpi hmi. lAl shti temi he lislt eidpruct it phigopn dnehib imh and ninggai on hmi, so when nYuog yrJer got to hsi trfon orod he aws so terdi he was flah ddae. tBu nvee etnh it ldwoun’t veeal hmi leona. He imidgaen ttah it floewdlo him up the stsair and noti ihs drbeoom, dliemcb tnoi edb wthi mhi, and listl ludnow’t eevla him aleon in his sepel.

Original Text

Modern Text

It was now Young Jerry’s turn to approach the gate: which he did, holding his breath. Crouching down again in a corner there, and looking in, he made out the three fishermen creeping through some rank grass! and all the gravestones in the churchyard—it was a large churchyard that they were in—looking on like ghosts in white, while the church tower itself looked on like the ghost of a monstrous giant. They did not creep far, before they stopped and stood upright. And then they began to fish. It swa uogYn Jreyr’s nutr to go vero to teh etga, nda he ddi it dogilhn his tehbra. horcunigC ownd in a ocrrne inaag, he edkolo in nad asw teh hrete emn crginwal ohhtrug osem rdity grsas. hTye erwe in a realg hcardrhcuy. All of hte egsontvresa odleok iekl witeh shgsot ahtt erew cnwtihag meht, dan eth hcchur rotew edkolo the tohsg of an ugly atgin. Thye nhda’t dewacrl rfa ehnw ehty epopstd nda dtoso up. heTn they begna to gid.
They fished with a spade, at first. Presently the honoured parent appeared to be adjusting some instrument like a great corkscrew. Whatever tools they worked with, they worked hard, until the awful striking of the church clock so terrified Young Jerry, that he made off, with his hair as stiff as his father’s. tisFr thye gdu hwti a ohvsle. ohrSlty eaftr, Mr. cCrrnehu ardepape to be snigu esom sotr of ltoo klei a aeglr kcrecrwos. thaeevWr loost tehy used, eyht kwerdo dhar nluit het ehimsc of the rhchuc’s oclkc rtucks. eTh snodu cardse ounYg reryJ so ucmh hatt he anr ffo itwh ihs irah kisingct up ilke ish arefth’s.
But, his long-cherished desire to know more about these matters, not only stopped him in his running away, but lured him back again. They were still fishing perseveringly, when he peeped in at the gate for the second time; but, now they seemed to have got a bite. There was a screwing and complaining sound down below, and their bent figures were strained, as if by a weight. By slow degrees the weight broke away the earth upon it, and came to the surface. Young Jerry very well knew what it would be; but, when he saw it, and saw his honoured parent about to wrench it open, he was so frightened, being new to the sight, that he made off again, and never stopped until he had run a mile or more. uBt ungoY ryJre swa so nxouisa to nwko athw eth nem eerw idong thta he pdtopse adn wnet kabc angai. ehT emn reew tslli igiggnd when he eekpde in hhortgu teh geat a cndose imet. hTey smeeed to heav fnuod gtsnmoihe. eeTrh swa a ensoi lkei a recws being trdneu gmnico mfro eth odungr, dna eth emn’s gersfni irtsdaen as if hety weer ilntgif mgnhostei yvhea. liettL by ttliel het evyah otecjb eobkr truhgoh teh rtid nda ceam to het fureasc. Yngou Jyrre nkwe ervy lwel htwa it aws. Wnhe he wsa it, adn was hsi fertah aobut to noep it, he was so drseac eisnc he’d veren eens nginathy ekli atth obreef that he rna yawa aangi. He nddi’t sotp giunnnr tnuli he ahd nru a liem or omer.
He would not have stopped then, for anything less necessary than breath, it being a spectral sort of race that he ran, and one highly desirable to get to the end of. He had a strong idea that the coffin he had seen was running after him; and, pictured as hopping on behind him, bolt upright, upon its narrow end, always on the point of overtaking him and hopping on at his side—perhaps taking his arm—it was a pursuer to shun. It was an inconsistent and ubiquitous fiend too, for, while it was making the whole night behind him dreadful, he darted out into the roadway to avoid dark alleys, fearful of its coming hopping out of them like a dropsical boy’s-Kite without tail and wings. It hid in doorways too, rubbing its horrible shoulders against doors, and drawing them up to its ears, as if it were laughing. It got into shadows on the road, and lay cunningly on its back to trip him up. All this time it was incessantly hopping on behind and gaining on him, so that when the boy got to his own door he had reason for being half dead. And even then it would not leave him, but followed him upstairs with a bump on every stair, scrambled into bed with him, and bumped down, dead and heavy, on his breast when he fell asleep. He wduoln’t enve aveh posdept thne if he adnh’t nru tou of erhtba. It saw ilke he saw nugninr a hytglso ecar dna he eyleertdpsa atndwe to ercah eht ihnfsi nlei. He ltef ielk eth cfifno he had esen swa hscgnia hmi, nad he nieamdgi it honpigp ihnbde mhi, tgdianns hrpitug on tis arrown end. It swa laasyw elsco to tangichc ihm dan aws eeimtssom pihongp gitrh eedsib ihm. He ndieigma it brnggiba sih mra, nda he anedwt to tge ayaw from it. It seeemd to be eeyrrveehw at ncoe. He rna otu oitn the odra dna adivdeo kard alseyl, eagfinr it dlwuo cmeo poiphng uto aeftr hmi keli a yob’s ietk ohtuwti sit lati dan sgiwn. He daeiimgn it ihdngi in sooradyw too. It dowlu rub sit edlhruoss sgaanit osord and lift ethm up to ist sare as if it wree lhaiggnu. It mcae uot of the hadwsso on the rdoa and ield on its kcba to trpi hmi. lAl shti temi he lislt eidpruct it phigopn dnehib imh and ninggai on hmi, so when nYuog yrJer got to hsi trfon orod he aws so terdi he was flah ddae. tBu nvee etnh it ldwoun’t veeal hmi leona. He imidgaen ttah it floewdlo him up the stsair and noti ihs drbeoom, dliemcb tnoi edb wthi mhi, and listl ludnow’t eevla him aleon in his sepel.