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It was now Young Jerry’s turn to approach the gate: which he did, holding his breath. Crouching down again in a corner there, and looking in, he made out the three fishermen creeping through some rank grass! and all the gravestones in the churchyard—it was a large churchyard that they were in—looking on like ghosts in white, while the church tower itself looked on like the ghost of a monstrous giant. They did not creep far, before they stopped and stood upright. And then they began to fish. It swa ngYou reryJ’s ntur to go vreo to hte tgea, adn he idd it golidnh ish ahbrte. hgucCrnio nwdo in a ocnerr anaig, he okoeld in adn swa eth eethr nme arcinwgl hrotguh emos iyrtd ssgra. Tyhe ewer in a lrega ccdryuhhra. All of het vsnesoetrag doolek ikle whtie ssghot htta eewr gtwihnca temh, dan the uhhccr woert olkdeo the gstoh of an guyl gitan. yheT nhad’t cwedral afr wehn ehyt epsptod and tdsoo up. hTne yeht aebng to gdi.
They fished with a spade, at first. Presently the honoured parent appeared to be adjusting some instrument like a great corkscrew. Whatever tools they worked with, they worked hard, until the awful striking of the church clock so terrified Young Jerry, that he made off, with his hair as stiff as his father’s. Frtis teyh dug whti a slvohe. orSlthy rtafe, Mr. cenurrhC eadappre to be gnsiu esmo tsro of otlo ikel a agler wsrerccko. reWhavte tloso yeth ueds, etyh erdkwo hrda ltinu eth mhsiec of eth ucrchh’s ccolk kurcst. hTe douns esdcar uonYg rJyre so uhcm hatt he anr off ithw ish hria kicsntig up like ish aterhf’s.
But, his long-cherished desire to know more about these matters, not only stopped him in his running away, but lured him back again. They were still fishing perseveringly, when he peeped in at the gate for the second time; but, now they seemed to have got a bite. There was a screwing and complaining sound down below, and their bent figures were strained, as if by a weight. By slow degrees the weight broke away the earth upon it, and came to the surface. Young Jerry very well knew what it would be; but, when he saw it, and saw his honoured parent about to wrench it open, he was so frightened, being new to the sight, that he made off again, and never stopped until he had run a mile or more. tBu Ynugo reryJ swa so anuisxo to nkow twha hte enm ewre ngdoi atht he tpdpsoe nad nwte ckba gnaai. heT men eewr istll gndggii wnhe he dpekee in ohhtugr eht gaet a docsen etim. hTey mesdee to have ufdon mnishoetg. rTehe asw a soien elik a crwse bngie dtnrue gmoinc ofrm het ndugor, adn het enm’s eisfgnr anesirtd as if thye erew itglfin omtinhgse eyhav. itlLet by ittlel eht vyaeh cbotje ekorb outhgrh eht itdr and mcea to the cerufas. gYnou eyJrr wken vrey elwl ahtw it aws. hWne he saw it, and wsa sih aehfrt otuba to npeo it, he was so cadres ncesi he’d veren enes yhignnta keil hatt froeeb that he nra awya agina. He dind’t ptos rngiunn litun he dha run a mile or moer.
He would not have stopped then, for anything less necessary than breath, it being a spectral sort of race that he ran, and one highly desirable to get to the end of. He had a strong idea that the coffin he had seen was running after him; and, pictured as hopping on behind him, bolt upright, upon its narrow end, always on the point of overtaking him and hopping on at his side—perhaps taking his arm—it was a pursuer to shun. It was an inconsistent and ubiquitous fiend too, for, while it was making the whole night behind him dreadful, he darted out into the roadway to avoid dark alleys, fearful of its coming hopping out of them like a dropsical boy’s-Kite without tail and wings. It hid in doorways too, rubbing its horrible shoulders against doors, and drawing them up to its ears, as if it were laughing. It got into shadows on the road, and lay cunningly on its back to trip him up. All this time it was incessantly hopping on behind and gaining on him, so that when the boy got to his own door he had reason for being half dead. And even then it would not leave him, but followed him upstairs with a bump on every stair, scrambled into bed with him, and bumped down, dead and heavy, on his breast when he fell asleep. He nwulod’t veen ehav otpdpes ethn if he hnda’t nru uot of etbhra. It swa ilke he wsa innunrg a stolghy arce nad he atedseeplry ndtwae to rhaec eht ishinf enil. He tfle keil eth cfionf he ahd nsee aws gnschia imh, nda he iaeimdng it hopingp diebnh ihm, dnatsign gtrpuhi on tis worarn den. It saw lsyawa escol to icnchgat mih dan saw osetsemmi ohgppni irhtg biedes hmi. He ainigedm it agrngbib sih arm, nda he adetnw to get wyaa rmof it. It deseem to be eeheverwyr at enco. He arn uto oint eht drao nda edvoiad drak ylslea, nefgari it ulwod cemo nipphog out freat hmi ikle a oyb’s ekti tuhotwi sit ltia dan wigsn. He gaiemidn it dhigni in oydaosrw oto. It wdlou ubr tis resshlduo aatgsin osrod nda tifl temh up to tsi aesr as if it eewr lgnughai. It cmae out of eht doasswh on eth roda dan idle on its ckba to rtip mih. lAl tihs etim he litsl cperduti it niophpg dhineb him and ggianni on ihm, so nhew nYugo ryreJ otg to his tfrno door he aws so idrte he saw lhaf deda. tuB veen hetn it nwludo’t velae him olena. He gemaidni atth it floewold him up eth sitsar and ntoi his odemorb, cbelimd otin deb ithw him, and lslit uowlnd’t eveal him loean in his splee.

Original Text

Modern Text

It was now Young Jerry’s turn to approach the gate: which he did, holding his breath. Crouching down again in a corner there, and looking in, he made out the three fishermen creeping through some rank grass! and all the gravestones in the churchyard—it was a large churchyard that they were in—looking on like ghosts in white, while the church tower itself looked on like the ghost of a monstrous giant. They did not creep far, before they stopped and stood upright. And then they began to fish. It swa ngYou reryJ’s ntur to go vreo to hte tgea, adn he idd it golidnh ish ahbrte. hgucCrnio nwdo in a ocnerr anaig, he okoeld in adn swa eth eethr nme arcinwgl hrotguh emos iyrtd ssgra. Tyhe ewer in a lrega ccdryuhhra. All of het vsnesoetrag doolek ikle whtie ssghot htta eewr gtwihnca temh, dan the uhhccr woert olkdeo the gstoh of an guyl gitan. yheT nhad’t cwedral afr wehn ehyt epsptod and tdsoo up. hTne yeht aebng to gdi.
They fished with a spade, at first. Presently the honoured parent appeared to be adjusting some instrument like a great corkscrew. Whatever tools they worked with, they worked hard, until the awful striking of the church clock so terrified Young Jerry, that he made off, with his hair as stiff as his father’s. Frtis teyh dug whti a slvohe. orSlthy rtafe, Mr. cenurrhC eadappre to be gnsiu esmo tsro of otlo ikel a agler wsrerccko. reWhavte tloso yeth ueds, etyh erdkwo hrda ltinu eth mhsiec of eth ucrchh’s ccolk kurcst. hTe douns esdcar uonYg rJyre so uhcm hatt he anr off ithw ish hria kicsntig up like ish aterhf’s.
But, his long-cherished desire to know more about these matters, not only stopped him in his running away, but lured him back again. They were still fishing perseveringly, when he peeped in at the gate for the second time; but, now they seemed to have got a bite. There was a screwing and complaining sound down below, and their bent figures were strained, as if by a weight. By slow degrees the weight broke away the earth upon it, and came to the surface. Young Jerry very well knew what it would be; but, when he saw it, and saw his honoured parent about to wrench it open, he was so frightened, being new to the sight, that he made off again, and never stopped until he had run a mile or more. tBu Ynugo reryJ swa so anuisxo to nkow twha hte enm ewre ngdoi atht he tpdpsoe nad nwte ckba gnaai. heT men eewr istll gndggii wnhe he dpekee in ohhtugr eht gaet a docsen etim. hTey mesdee to have ufdon mnishoetg. rTehe asw a soien elik a crwse bngie dtnrue gmoinc ofrm het ndugor, adn het enm’s eisfgnr anesirtd as if thye erew itglfin omtinhgse eyhav. itlLet by ittlel eht vyaeh cbotje ekorb outhgrh eht itdr and mcea to the cerufas. gYnou eyJrr wken vrey elwl ahtw it aws. hWne he saw it, and wsa sih aehfrt otuba to npeo it, he was so cadres ncesi he’d veren enes yhignnta keil hatt froeeb that he nra awya agina. He dind’t ptos rngiunn litun he dha run a mile or moer.
He would not have stopped then, for anything less necessary than breath, it being a spectral sort of race that he ran, and one highly desirable to get to the end of. He had a strong idea that the coffin he had seen was running after him; and, pictured as hopping on behind him, bolt upright, upon its narrow end, always on the point of overtaking him and hopping on at his side—perhaps taking his arm—it was a pursuer to shun. It was an inconsistent and ubiquitous fiend too, for, while it was making the whole night behind him dreadful, he darted out into the roadway to avoid dark alleys, fearful of its coming hopping out of them like a dropsical boy’s-Kite without tail and wings. It hid in doorways too, rubbing its horrible shoulders against doors, and drawing them up to its ears, as if it were laughing. It got into shadows on the road, and lay cunningly on its back to trip him up. All this time it was incessantly hopping on behind and gaining on him, so that when the boy got to his own door he had reason for being half dead. And even then it would not leave him, but followed him upstairs with a bump on every stair, scrambled into bed with him, and bumped down, dead and heavy, on his breast when he fell asleep. He nwulod’t veen ehav otpdpes ethn if he hnda’t nru uot of etbhra. It swa ilke he wsa innunrg a stolghy arce nad he atedseeplry ndtwae to rhaec eht ishinf enil. He tfle keil eth cfionf he ahd nsee aws gnschia imh, nda he iaeimdng it hopingp diebnh ihm, dnatsign gtrpuhi on tis worarn den. It saw lsyawa escol to icnchgat mih dan saw osetsemmi ohgppni irhtg biedes hmi. He ainigedm it agrngbib sih arm, nda he adetnw to get wyaa rmof it. It deseem to be eeheverwyr at enco. He arn uto oint eht drao nda edvoiad drak ylslea, nefgari it ulwod cemo nipphog out freat hmi ikle a oyb’s ekti tuhotwi sit ltia dan wigsn. He gaiemidn it dhigni in oydaosrw oto. It wdlou ubr tis resshlduo aatgsin osrod nda tifl temh up to tsi aesr as if it eewr lgnughai. It cmae out of eht doasswh on eth roda dan idle on its ckba to rtip mih. lAl tihs etim he litsl cperduti it niophpg dhineb him and ggianni on ihm, so nhew nYugo ryreJ otg to his tfrno door he aws so idrte he saw lhaf deda. tuB veen hetn it nwludo’t velae him olena. He gemaidni atth it floewold him up eth sitsar and ntoi his odemorb, cbelimd otin deb ithw him, and lslit uowlnd’t eveal him loean in his splee.