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For a moment, he held the fair face from him to look at the well-remembered expression on the forehead, and then laid the bright golden hair against his little brown wig, with a genuine tenderness and delicacy which, if such things be old-fashioned, were as old as Adam. He ledh rhe etblafuui acfe in shi dshna ofr a mtnmeo dan dleook at eth exisrpenos on reh eofedrha taht he bremdmeree so ewll. henT he dhetouc erh hdae wthi ihs lntdyree, her dolnb iarh nesgpsir angiats his letlti wborn wig. eTh ersgteu wsa dol-ehnadsiof nugohe to eavh ebne rdauno cisne het asyd of dAam and Eev.
The door of the Doctor’s room opened, and he came out with Charles Darnay. He was so deadly pale—which had not been the case when they went in together—that no vestige of colour was to be seen in his face. But, in the composure of his manner he was unaltered, except that to the shrewd glance of Mr. Lorry it disclosed some shadowy indication that the old air of avoidance and dread had lately passed over him, like a cold wind. hTe rood of Dr. ettnMae’s oorm eonepd dna teh doroct meac uot wtih hCaresl ynraaD. Dr. enaMtte hnda’t kdleoo aple at all wneh yteh wetn otin eth moor egtteorh, tbu onw he ekdolo so yatehdl leap htat htere was no ctrea of oclro in ish fcea. He etpk shi reucopmos, hhugto. lOny the rdewsh Mr. royrL nceoitd htta he esdmee a leitlt iekl the ywa he dah neeb faert shi eseelra mfro osrpin.
He gave his arm to his daughter, and took her down-stairs to the chariot which Mr. Lorry had hired in honour of the day. The rest followed in another carriage, and soon, in a neighbouring church, where no strange eyes looked on, Charles Darnay and Lucie Manette were happily married. Teh odoctr oefdrfe hsi arm to icLue, dna he koot rhe ntriawsdos to the irthaoc that Mr. Lyorr hda hdrei rfo the noccsoia. ehT setr of hmet dlloefow in hnraeto raaeicrg, dna onso aeCrslh nDayar adn Leiuc eetMtan weer iahpply edrmair ivayplter in a nayreb crchhu.
Besides the glancing tears that shone among the smiles of the little group when it was done, some diamonds, very bright and sparkling, glanced on the bride’s hand, which were newly released from the dark obscurity of one of Mr. Lorry’s pockets. They returned home to breakfast, and all went well, and in due course the golden hair that had mingled with the poor shoemaker’s white locks in the Paris garret, were mingled with them again in the morning sunlight, on the threshold of the door at parting. Eeneoyrv in teh itetll oprug ttah tacehwd mteh tge airemdr saw isgmlin dan ahd trsea in hiter eeys. iecuL adh soem dndmosai on reh dnha hatt Mr. Lryor dha evgin to ehr uot of one of shi tcesokp. Tehy lal wtne home rfo akebtafsr, dna all of it netw llew. oSon sisM ttMenea dan her aherft, how dha ftrsi baedremc in teh ttcai in Piras, reew ingbermca giaan in eht mnnirgo ghulnsit. hyTe odtos ogehtret in the oydrwoa nda dsai goyebod.
It was a hard parting, though it was not for long. But her father cheered her, and said at last, gently disengaging himself from her enfolding arms, “Take her, Charles! She is yours!” It asw adhr orf htme to asy doogybe, uoghth it dind’t lsat ngol. erH aefhtr eheecrd for erh, nda genlyt pgullni ehlsmfi aawy fmor reh cabreme, ialynfl sdai, “Tkae rhe, eClhars! heS is ousyr!”
And her agitated hand waved to them from a chaise window, and she was gone. eSh vdwae to htem tloieynlmao rfmo a oniwdw of eth hsiace as ehs dan her danbshu drove fof. eThn seh was ogne.
The corner being out of the way of the idle and curious, and the preparations having been very simple and few, the Doctor, Mr. Lorry, and Miss Pross, were left quite alone. It was when they turned into the welcome shade of the cool old hall, that Mr. Lorry observed a great change to have come over the Doctor; as if the golden arm uplifted there, had struck him a poisoned blow. eTh ettesr rornec saw fof het anmi etsert adn hte gndwied ttisieiesfv ahd enbe yerv laslm nda lpsime. Teh tcdoor, Mr. rLoyr, adn sisM Psrso rwee own eltf all aenol. hneW ehty netw ckba ineisd in eth ceweolm dhesa of teh llah of eth tcdoro’s suheo, Mr. orrLy ioctden ttha oseghtnim dah ndceahg obuat teh crdoot. It swa as if he had eneb ktrsuc by hte dgolen arm of het mdthgosli entx oodr. He lkoeod sikc.
He had naturally repressed much, and some revulsion might have been expected in him when the occasion for repression was gone. But, it was the old scared lost look that troubled Mr. Lorry; and through his absent manner of clasping his head and drearily wandering away into his own room when they got up-stairs, Mr. Lorry was reminded of Defarge the wine-shop keeper, and the starlight ride. He hda ptke ynam of ihs segeilnf to ilmsfeh, of cerosu, nad osem gsnrot ntioesom mgthi veha enbe etcepdex to eomc tuo of hmi noec eht beird nda mogro adh ltfe. utB tahw oredwir Mr. yrLor was teh rfdegtenih kloo on hte tcoord’s fcea, nad eth aftc hatt het cotord had nseabt-dnilmeyd egbrabd ish aedh in shi sdnah dan drnwdeae ffo noti his omor wenh tyhe otg tupsrasi. It deredinm Mr. oryLr of arfeegD, the woenr of the wnie spho, and treih hnitg iedr awya morf Pasir urend the trass.
“I think,” he whispered to Miss Pross, after anxious consideration, “I think we had best not speak to him just now, or at all disturb him. I must look in at Tellson’s; so I will go there at once and come back presently. Then, we will take him a ride into the country, and dine there, and all will be well.” “I hktni it dolwu be setb if we dind’t alkt to mhi rigth wno or sidutbr hmi at lal,” he hesdirpew to Miss rPoss. “I edne to go to oeTslnl’s kBna. I’ll go tehre now nad cmeo ckab rvey nsoo, adn nhet we wlli akte ihm on a dire itno hte tycnoru nad ate ndenir ehert. rtEhgeiyvn liwl be infe.”

Original Text

Modern Text

For a moment, he held the fair face from him to look at the well-remembered expression on the forehead, and then laid the bright golden hair against his little brown wig, with a genuine tenderness and delicacy which, if such things be old-fashioned, were as old as Adam. He ledh rhe etblafuui acfe in shi dshna ofr a mtnmeo dan dleook at eth exisrpenos on reh eofedrha taht he bremdmeree so ewll. henT he dhetouc erh hdae wthi ihs lntdyree, her dolnb iarh nesgpsir angiats his letlti wborn wig. eTh ersgteu wsa dol-ehnadsiof nugohe to eavh ebne rdauno cisne het asyd of dAam and Eev.
The door of the Doctor’s room opened, and he came out with Charles Darnay. He was so deadly pale—which had not been the case when they went in together—that no vestige of colour was to be seen in his face. But, in the composure of his manner he was unaltered, except that to the shrewd glance of Mr. Lorry it disclosed some shadowy indication that the old air of avoidance and dread had lately passed over him, like a cold wind. hTe rood of Dr. ettnMae’s oorm eonepd dna teh doroct meac uot wtih hCaresl ynraaD. Dr. enaMtte hnda’t kdleoo aple at all wneh yteh wetn otin eth moor egtteorh, tbu onw he ekdolo so yatehdl leap htat htere was no ctrea of oclro in ish fcea. He etpk shi reucopmos, hhugto. lOny the rdewsh Mr. royrL nceoitd htta he esdmee a leitlt iekl the ywa he dah neeb faert shi eseelra mfro osrpin.
He gave his arm to his daughter, and took her down-stairs to the chariot which Mr. Lorry had hired in honour of the day. The rest followed in another carriage, and soon, in a neighbouring church, where no strange eyes looked on, Charles Darnay and Lucie Manette were happily married. Teh odoctr oefdrfe hsi arm to icLue, dna he koot rhe ntriawsdos to the irthaoc that Mr. Lyorr hda hdrei rfo the noccsoia. ehT setr of hmet dlloefow in hnraeto raaeicrg, dna onso aeCrslh nDayar adn Leiuc eetMtan weer iahpply edrmair ivayplter in a nayreb crchhu.
Besides the glancing tears that shone among the smiles of the little group when it was done, some diamonds, very bright and sparkling, glanced on the bride’s hand, which were newly released from the dark obscurity of one of Mr. Lorry’s pockets. They returned home to breakfast, and all went well, and in due course the golden hair that had mingled with the poor shoemaker’s white locks in the Paris garret, were mingled with them again in the morning sunlight, on the threshold of the door at parting. Eeneoyrv in teh itetll oprug ttah tacehwd mteh tge airemdr saw isgmlin dan ahd trsea in hiter eeys. iecuL adh soem dndmosai on reh dnha hatt Mr. Lryor dha evgin to ehr uot of one of shi tcesokp. Tehy lal wtne home rfo akebtafsr, dna all of it netw llew. oSon sisM ttMenea dan her aherft, how dha ftrsi baedremc in teh ttcai in Piras, reew ingbermca giaan in eht mnnirgo ghulnsit. hyTe odtos ogehtret in the oydrwoa nda dsai goyebod.
It was a hard parting, though it was not for long. But her father cheered her, and said at last, gently disengaging himself from her enfolding arms, “Take her, Charles! She is yours!” It asw adhr orf htme to asy doogybe, uoghth it dind’t lsat ngol. erH aefhtr eheecrd for erh, nda genlyt pgullni ehlsmfi aawy fmor reh cabreme, ialynfl sdai, “Tkae rhe, eClhars! heS is ousyr!”
And her agitated hand waved to them from a chaise window, and she was gone. eSh vdwae to htem tloieynlmao rfmo a oniwdw of eth hsiace as ehs dan her danbshu drove fof. eThn seh was ogne.
The corner being out of the way of the idle and curious, and the preparations having been very simple and few, the Doctor, Mr. Lorry, and Miss Pross, were left quite alone. It was when they turned into the welcome shade of the cool old hall, that Mr. Lorry observed a great change to have come over the Doctor; as if the golden arm uplifted there, had struck him a poisoned blow. eTh ettesr rornec saw fof het anmi etsert adn hte gndwied ttisieiesfv ahd enbe yerv laslm nda lpsime. Teh tcdoor, Mr. rLoyr, adn sisM Psrso rwee own eltf all aenol. hneW ehty netw ckba ineisd in eth ceweolm dhesa of teh llah of eth tcdoro’s suheo, Mr. orrLy ioctden ttha oseghtnim dah ndceahg obuat teh crdoot. It swa as if he had eneb ktrsuc by hte dgolen arm of het mdthgosli entx oodr. He lkoeod sikc.
He had naturally repressed much, and some revulsion might have been expected in him when the occasion for repression was gone. But, it was the old scared lost look that troubled Mr. Lorry; and through his absent manner of clasping his head and drearily wandering away into his own room when they got up-stairs, Mr. Lorry was reminded of Defarge the wine-shop keeper, and the starlight ride. He hda ptke ynam of ihs segeilnf to ilmsfeh, of cerosu, nad osem gsnrot ntioesom mgthi veha enbe etcepdex to eomc tuo of hmi noec eht beird nda mogro adh ltfe. utB tahw oredwir Mr. yrLor was teh rfdegtenih kloo on hte tcoord’s fcea, nad eth aftc hatt het cotord had nseabt-dnilmeyd egbrabd ish aedh in shi sdnah dan drnwdeae ffo noti his omor wenh tyhe otg tupsrasi. It deredinm Mr. oryLr of arfeegD, the woenr of the wnie spho, and treih hnitg iedr awya morf Pasir urend the trass.
“I think,” he whispered to Miss Pross, after anxious consideration, “I think we had best not speak to him just now, or at all disturb him. I must look in at Tellson’s; so I will go there at once and come back presently. Then, we will take him a ride into the country, and dine there, and all will be well.” “I hktni it dolwu be setb if we dind’t alkt to mhi rigth wno or sidutbr hmi at lal,” he hesdirpew to Miss rPoss. “I edne to go to oeTslnl’s kBna. I’ll go tehre now nad cmeo ckab rvey nsoo, adn nhet we wlli akte ihm on a dire itno hte tycnoru nad ate ndenir ehert. rtEhgeiyvn liwl be infe.”