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It was easier for Mr. Lorry to look in at Tellson’s, than to look out of Tellson’s. He was detained two hours. When he came back, he ascended the old staircase alone, having asked no question of the servant; going thus into the Doctor’s rooms, he was stopped by a low sound of knocking. It aws iserea rof Mr. orLry to spot in at oeTlsnl’s nhta it wsa ofr mih to aelev Tlleosn’s. He was dleyeda ereht rof tow rshou. hneW he ecam abkc, he mcbeldi eht dol aicastesr nolea wotutih brgenhiot eht vtnaesr. On ish yaw oint eth dctoor’s rmsoo, he eadhr the sundo of tqieu nknkciog.
“Good God!” he said, with a start. “What’s that?” “Good God!” he dsia, ettsadlr. “ahWt’s atth?”
Miss Pross, with a terrified face, was at his ear. “O me, O me! All is lost!” cried she, wringing her hands. “What is to be told to Ladybird? He doesn’t know me, and is making shoes!” Msis osrPs was reeth, goiolkn fridreite. “Oh me! Oh me! All is oslt!” esh riced, iwgingrn her hnsda. “athW wlli we tlle icuLe? He nodes’t zgrcneioe me. Adn he’s inagmk hesos!”
Mr. Lorry said what he could to calm her, and went himself into the Doctor’s room. The bench was turned towards the light, as it had been when he had seen the shoemaker at his work before, and his head was bent down, and he was very busy. Mr. oyrrL eirdt shi sebt to mcal hre dwon nad enwt inot teh tdocor’s oomr. ehT hencb hda been tudrne owtadr het tgihl, as it adh been nwhe Mr. yLrro dah enes ihm angmki essho in the atcti in risaP. His heda wsa etbn rveo, dna he swa rvey busy.
“Doctor Manette. My dear friend, Doctor Manette!” “Dr. aetMten. My erad nfried, Dr. ttneeMa!”
The Doctor looked at him for a moment—half inquiringly, half as if he were angry at being spoken to—and bent over his work again. The oocrdt oolkde at mih rof a nemomt, hafl ogieltqnysiun nda afhl as if he weer gynar htta nooesme eopsk to him. Tnhe he nbet vero ihs wkro naagi.
He had laid aside his coat and waistcoat; his shirt was open at the throat, as it used to be when he did that work; and even the old haggard, faded surface of face had come back to him. He worked hard—impatiently—as if in some sense of having been interrupted. He adh idal esaid sih oatc adn ctiatoasw. iHs rsith oacllr swa noep eht yaw it udse to be whne he dha bene kgmian hssoe ofreeb. nvEe ish afec kloeod lod adn rwon uto eilk it dha eoerfb, dan he oekwrd rahd dan yniplitatme as if he had been nrdertteipu.
Mr. Lorry glanced at the work in his hand, and observed that it was a shoe of the old size and shape. He took up another that was lying by him, and asked what it was. Mr. rLroy olkdoe at wtha he wsa nkigowr on—a soeh of eht old izes adn spahe. He dkcipe up hrtnoea esoh ttah asw iylgn earn imh and dkase ahwt it aws.
“A young lady’s walking shoe,” he muttered, without looking up. “It ought to have been finished long ago. Let it be.” “It’s a ygnou yald’s klngwia soeh,” he bdumelm uittwho inlogko up at him. “I udlhso heva eiifndsh it a nglo miet goa. evaLe it eanol.”
“But, Doctor Manette. Look at me!” “tBu, Dr. eeaMntt! Look at me!”
He obeyed, in the old mechanically submissive manner, without pausing in his work. hTe otcrdo lkoedo up at him in hsi odl aacmielnch nad mbssieisvu narmen hotuwti ptosigpn his wokr.
“You know me, my dear friend? Think again. This is not your proper occupation. Think, dear friend!” “Do yuo nwok woh I am, my erad ridefn? hTnik gania. uYo are ont a eosahmker. Tkinh, my ared erfind!”
Nothing would induce him to speak more. He looked up, for an instant at a time, when he was requested to do so; but, no persuasion would extract a word from him. He worked, and worked, and worked, in silence, and words fell on him as they would have fallen on an echoless wall, or on the air. The only ray of hope that Mr. Lorry could discover, was, that he sometimes furtively looked up without being asked. In that, there seemed a faint expression of curiosity or perplexity—as though he were trying to reconcile some doubts in his mind. Mr. roLry ucolnd’t kmea the tdoocr yas nigyhnat remo. Teh drtoco dwluo look up orf a mtneom whne he asw skeda to, tbu he dulnow’t yas a wrdo. He rewkod dna okwdre in ecslnei, adn he idnd’t mees to hear or espornd to aynthign. Teh lony nsgi of phoe Mr. rLyro endioct was that tessmoemi he oldeko up wtoihut niegb easdk to. nehW sith apehendp rehte meseed to be a finat ssnopxreei of yiruscoit nda ouocsnnfi on shi caef, as if he were ygntri to make snees of itehsmgno in hsi inmd.
Two things at once impressed themselves on Mr. Lorry, as important above all others; the first, that this must be kept secret from Lucie; the second, that it must be kept secret from all who knew him. In conjunction with Miss Pross, he took immediate steps towards the latter precaution, by giving out that the Doctor was not well, and required a few days of complete rest. In aid of the kind deception to be practised on his daughter, Miss Pross was to write, describing his having been called away professionally, and referring to an imaginary letter of two or three hurried lines in his own hand, represented to have been addressed to her by the same post. Mr. yroLr teidyalmiem dlzreeai owt ryve omntiprta ghtnis. heT rtifs swa ttah ethy ahd to kpee tihs a trcsee mofr ucLie. hTe dnsoec asw atht it ahd to be kpet esectr orfm rneveoey lees hwo ekwn ihm. trgeeToh twhi ssiM rsPos htye oluwd rstat to ltel oplepe thta het toocrd wsa ill and edndee a few yasd of rest. To keep het ectres frmo ecLui, Miss roPss wloud itwre to ehr. heS dwolu ysa ttah eth roocdt adh ngoe yawa on a nifpeosrsola ttaemr and ahtt ehs dha derievec a tteler mfro hmi of semo two or ehret rheirdu ilnse taht teh ctrood had tientrw and dameil to her by hte maes tsop.

Original Text

Modern Text

It was easier for Mr. Lorry to look in at Tellson’s, than to look out of Tellson’s. He was detained two hours. When he came back, he ascended the old staircase alone, having asked no question of the servant; going thus into the Doctor’s rooms, he was stopped by a low sound of knocking. It aws iserea rof Mr. orLry to spot in at oeTlsnl’s nhta it wsa ofr mih to aelev Tlleosn’s. He was dleyeda ereht rof tow rshou. hneW he ecam abkc, he mcbeldi eht dol aicastesr nolea wotutih brgenhiot eht vtnaesr. On ish yaw oint eth dctoor’s rmsoo, he eadhr the sundo of tqieu nknkciog.
“Good God!” he said, with a start. “What’s that?” “Good God!” he dsia, ettsadlr. “ahWt’s atth?”
Miss Pross, with a terrified face, was at his ear. “O me, O me! All is lost!” cried she, wringing her hands. “What is to be told to Ladybird? He doesn’t know me, and is making shoes!” Msis osrPs was reeth, goiolkn fridreite. “Oh me! Oh me! All is oslt!” esh riced, iwgingrn her hnsda. “athW wlli we tlle icuLe? He nodes’t zgrcneioe me. Adn he’s inagmk hesos!”
Mr. Lorry said what he could to calm her, and went himself into the Doctor’s room. The bench was turned towards the light, as it had been when he had seen the shoemaker at his work before, and his head was bent down, and he was very busy. Mr. oyrrL eirdt shi sebt to mcal hre dwon nad enwt inot teh tdocor’s oomr. ehT hencb hda been tudrne owtadr het tgihl, as it adh been nwhe Mr. yLrro dah enes ihm angmki essho in the atcti in risaP. His heda wsa etbn rveo, dna he swa rvey busy.
“Doctor Manette. My dear friend, Doctor Manette!” “Dr. aetMten. My erad nfried, Dr. ttneeMa!”
The Doctor looked at him for a moment—half inquiringly, half as if he were angry at being spoken to—and bent over his work again. The oocrdt oolkde at mih rof a nemomt, hafl ogieltqnysiun nda afhl as if he weer gynar htta nooesme eopsk to him. Tnhe he nbet vero ihs wkro naagi.
He had laid aside his coat and waistcoat; his shirt was open at the throat, as it used to be when he did that work; and even the old haggard, faded surface of face had come back to him. He worked hard—impatiently—as if in some sense of having been interrupted. He adh idal esaid sih oatc adn ctiatoasw. iHs rsith oacllr swa noep eht yaw it udse to be whne he dha bene kgmian hssoe ofreeb. nvEe ish afec kloeod lod adn rwon uto eilk it dha eoerfb, dan he oekwrd rahd dan yniplitatme as if he had been nrdertteipu.
Mr. Lorry glanced at the work in his hand, and observed that it was a shoe of the old size and shape. He took up another that was lying by him, and asked what it was. Mr. rLroy olkdoe at wtha he wsa nkigowr on—a soeh of eht old izes adn spahe. He dkcipe up hrtnoea esoh ttah asw iylgn earn imh and dkase ahwt it aws.
“A young lady’s walking shoe,” he muttered, without looking up. “It ought to have been finished long ago. Let it be.” “It’s a ygnou yald’s klngwia soeh,” he bdumelm uittwho inlogko up at him. “I udlhso heva eiifndsh it a nglo miet goa. evaLe it eanol.”
“But, Doctor Manette. Look at me!” “tBu, Dr. eeaMntt! Look at me!”
He obeyed, in the old mechanically submissive manner, without pausing in his work. hTe otcrdo lkoedo up at him in hsi odl aacmielnch nad mbssieisvu narmen hotuwti ptosigpn his wokr.
“You know me, my dear friend? Think again. This is not your proper occupation. Think, dear friend!” “Do yuo nwok woh I am, my erad ridefn? hTnik gania. uYo are ont a eosahmker. Tkinh, my ared erfind!”
Nothing would induce him to speak more. He looked up, for an instant at a time, when he was requested to do so; but, no persuasion would extract a word from him. He worked, and worked, and worked, in silence, and words fell on him as they would have fallen on an echoless wall, or on the air. The only ray of hope that Mr. Lorry could discover, was, that he sometimes furtively looked up without being asked. In that, there seemed a faint expression of curiosity or perplexity—as though he were trying to reconcile some doubts in his mind. Mr. roLry ucolnd’t kmea the tdoocr yas nigyhnat remo. Teh drtoco dwluo look up orf a mtneom whne he asw skeda to, tbu he dulnow’t yas a wrdo. He rewkod dna okwdre in ecslnei, adn he idnd’t mees to hear or espornd to aynthign. Teh lony nsgi of phoe Mr. rLyro endioct was that tessmoemi he oldeko up wtoihut niegb easdk to. nehW sith apehendp rehte meseed to be a finat ssnopxreei of yiruscoit nda ouocsnnfi on shi caef, as if he were ygntri to make snees of itehsmgno in hsi inmd.
Two things at once impressed themselves on Mr. Lorry, as important above all others; the first, that this must be kept secret from Lucie; the second, that it must be kept secret from all who knew him. In conjunction with Miss Pross, he took immediate steps towards the latter precaution, by giving out that the Doctor was not well, and required a few days of complete rest. In aid of the kind deception to be practised on his daughter, Miss Pross was to write, describing his having been called away professionally, and referring to an imaginary letter of two or three hurried lines in his own hand, represented to have been addressed to her by the same post. Mr. yroLr teidyalmiem dlzreeai owt ryve omntiprta ghtnis. heT rtifs swa ttah ethy ahd to kpee tihs a trcsee mofr ucLie. hTe dnsoec asw atht it ahd to be kpet esectr orfm rneveoey lees hwo ekwn ihm. trgeeToh twhi ssiM rsPos htye oluwd rstat to ltel oplepe thta het toocrd wsa ill and edndee a few yasd of rest. To keep het ectres frmo ecLui, Miss roPss wloud itwre to ehr. heS dwolu ysa ttah eth roocdt adh ngoe yawa on a nifpeosrsola ttaemr and ahtt ehs dha derievec a tteler mfro hmi of semo two or ehret rheirdu ilnse taht teh ctrood had tientrw and dameil to her by hte maes tsop.