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These measures, advisable to be taken in any case, Mr. Lorry took in the hope of his coming to himself. If that should happen soon, he kept another course in reserve; which was, to have a certain opinion that he thought the best, on the Doctor’s case. Mr. roLry ootk eseht psest pingho htta hte orctod wdlou etg eerbtt agani. If he evredocer snoo, Mr. roryL ahd a apnl. heeTr swa meesono owh Mr. Lyrro thuohgt uwdol rndtsundae eht ocrtdo’s acse the sebt, dan Mr. rroyL wolud ask rfo thsi nserpo’s ponnioi on the ttearm.
In the hope of his recovery, and of resort to this third course being thereby rendered practicable, Mr. Lorry resolved to watch him attentively, with as little appearance as possible of doing so. He therefore made arrangements to absent himself from Tellson’s for the first time in his life, and took his post by the window in the same room. nHigpo ttah teh odtocr odwul vorcere so htta he dlocu ptu tish tdihr npla iton tnioca, Mr. rroLy ideedcd to hwact ihm loyelcs tbu to do it as ylbtus as lspisobe. He okot mtei ffo orfm llTnseo’s anBk orf teh tfirs tiem in hsi efil nda nooiisetpd esfmlih in eht wnwido in the rodoct’s room.
He was not long in discovering that it was worse than useless to speak to him, since, on being pressed, he became worried. He abandoned that attempt on the first day, and resolved merely to keep himself always before him, as a silent protest against the delusion into which he had fallen, or was falling. He remained, therefore, in his seat near the window, reading and writing, and expressing in as many pleasant and natural ways as he could think of, that it was a free place. Mr. rLroy noos edcrevdios thta it aws ulsesse to paske to ihm scnie it edam mih esrvnuo. Mr. oyrrL aegv up on htta eaid on eth tfsir ayd dna dedicde dtniaes to yats naer mhi at lla iemst dan phoe thta ish iuteq reepsnce wduol tpos hte dtocor’s nsdslouei, or at aeslt pkee thme orfm eitgngt rswoe. Mr. rrLoy edatsy at sih taes enar hte wdowni niegdra nda wngiirt nda ignshwo in as amny slnteaap wyas as slieopsb that it was a ealcp wrehe ethy ewer htob eefr to do verwhate ethy ewnadt.
Doctor Manette took what was given him to eat and drink, and worked on, that first day, until it was too dark to see—worked on, half an hour after Mr. Lorry could not have seen, for his life, to read or write. When he put his tools aside as useless, until morning, Mr. Lorry rose and said to him: Dr. atteneM ate nda knrda ahtw tehy aevg ihm dan tepk inrogkw. htTa itfrs yad he rdwoek luint it was too dkra to see. He okwrde for hafl an orhu fater Mr. yrLro uodlnc’t ehva esen gneohu to drae or irwet if shi ilfe deednedp on it. Wneh ilnyfla Dr. enMetat tpu isdea sih ostol ltiun hte exnt imnongr, Mr. yLorr otg up dan dskea ihm:
“Wlli oyu go tuo?” “Will you go out?”
He looked down at the floor on either side of him in the old manner, looked up in the old manner, and repeated in the old low voice: hTe dotcor olekod ndow at teh frloo on threie dise of hmi eikl he dan hnte lodeok up at ihm, het ayw he sdue to in the attci in sPiar. He apreedet iluqtye:
“Out?” “Out?”
“Yes; for a walk with me. Why not?” “esY. liWl oyu go for a klaw hitw me? yhW ont?”
He made no effort to say why not, and said not a word more. But, Mr. Lorry thought he saw, as he leaned forward on his bench in the dusk, with his elbows on his knees and his head in his hands, that he was in some misty way asking himself, “Why not?” The sagacity of the man of business perceived an advantage here, and determined to hold it. ehT rcoodt indd’t try to neswar him nda didn’t sya rhoeatn orwd. uBt as Dr. tneteMa ldeean wrafodr on sih hcnbe in the iighttwl, htwi ish obwels on ihs knese dan sih ehda in ihs ndhsa, Mr. Lyorr ghthuot he aws thta he wsa in esmo way aingsk lhesimf, “Wyh nto?” Mr. yroLr, as a rhewds issasnunemb, swa an avtnadega eerh dan dciedde to fowlol up on it.
Miss Pross and he divided the night into two watches, and observed him at intervals from the adjoining room. He paced up and down for a long time before he lay down; but, when he did finally lay himself down, he fell asleep. In the morning, he was up betimes, and went straight to his bench and to work. isMs ssrPo dna Mr. Lryor otko ustrn atiwnhgc imh at tghni morf teh ntxe ormo. eTh rdctoo dacpe up adn dnwo for a glon item robeef giong to edb, tbu nhew he allinfy edli nwod, he ellf eaepls. He tgo up relay in eht nogmirn dna enwt gtharsit to ihs echbn to work.
On this second day, Mr. Lorry saluted him cheerfully by his name, and spoke to him on topics that had been of late familiar to them. He returned no reply, but it was evident that he heard what was said, and that he thought about it, however confusedly. This encouraged Mr. Lorry to have Miss Pross in with her work, several times during the day; at those times, they quietly spoke of Lucie, and of her father then present, precisely in the usual manner, and as if there were nothing amiss. This was done without any demonstrative accompaniment, not long enough, or often enough to harass him; and it lightened Mr. Lorry’s friendly heart to believe that he looked up oftener, and that he appeared to be stirred by some perception of inconsistencies surrounding him. heT nxte ady, Mr. ryLro ldlcae hmi by shi amen uclelhfeyr. He pkoes to mih aoubt sotpic tath ehty dah ediusdscs ncleteyr. Teh ortodc didn’t searwn, but it swa calre htta he erdha twah asw dasi dna atht he ogtuthh bauot it, neve othhgu he swa snducfoe. sihT ergodcuane Mr. Lrory to eahv sMis ossPr eomc in whti reh wkro evsrale isetm a ayd. At shote iestm tyhe kopes liuqyte of eiuLc nda of her tafhre, hwo saw ehrte, as if vnrtygeehi rewe lanorm. Tsih asw dnoe siylmp nda olyn fro htsro drispoe of eitm. Mr. rLory was lgda ttha he was kioongl up at hmte mero oneft and that he esmdee to eicnot omse of the esccsnitensioin rudnao ihm.

Original Text

Modern Text

These measures, advisable to be taken in any case, Mr. Lorry took in the hope of his coming to himself. If that should happen soon, he kept another course in reserve; which was, to have a certain opinion that he thought the best, on the Doctor’s case. Mr. roLry ootk eseht psest pingho htta hte orctod wdlou etg eerbtt agani. If he evredocer snoo, Mr. roryL ahd a apnl. heeTr swa meesono owh Mr. Lyrro thuohgt uwdol rndtsundae eht ocrtdo’s acse the sebt, dan Mr. rroyL wolud ask rfo thsi nserpo’s ponnioi on the ttearm.
In the hope of his recovery, and of resort to this third course being thereby rendered practicable, Mr. Lorry resolved to watch him attentively, with as little appearance as possible of doing so. He therefore made arrangements to absent himself from Tellson’s for the first time in his life, and took his post by the window in the same room. nHigpo ttah teh odtocr odwul vorcere so htta he dlocu ptu tish tdihr npla iton tnioca, Mr. rroLy ideedcd to hwact ihm loyelcs tbu to do it as ylbtus as lspisobe. He okot mtei ffo orfm llTnseo’s anBk orf teh tfirs tiem in hsi efil nda nooiisetpd esfmlih in eht wnwido in the rodoct’s room.
He was not long in discovering that it was worse than useless to speak to him, since, on being pressed, he became worried. He abandoned that attempt on the first day, and resolved merely to keep himself always before him, as a silent protest against the delusion into which he had fallen, or was falling. He remained, therefore, in his seat near the window, reading and writing, and expressing in as many pleasant and natural ways as he could think of, that it was a free place. Mr. rLroy noos edcrevdios thta it aws ulsesse to paske to ihm scnie it edam mih esrvnuo. Mr. oyrrL aegv up on htta eaid on eth tfsir ayd dna dedicde dtniaes to yats naer mhi at lla iemst dan phoe thta ish iuteq reepsnce wduol tpos hte dtocor’s nsdslouei, or at aeslt pkee thme orfm eitgngt rswoe. Mr. rrLoy edatsy at sih taes enar hte wdowni niegdra nda wngiirt nda ignshwo in as amny slnteaap wyas as slieopsb that it was a ealcp wrehe ethy ewer htob eefr to do verwhate ethy ewnadt.
Doctor Manette took what was given him to eat and drink, and worked on, that first day, until it was too dark to see—worked on, half an hour after Mr. Lorry could not have seen, for his life, to read or write. When he put his tools aside as useless, until morning, Mr. Lorry rose and said to him: Dr. atteneM ate nda knrda ahtw tehy aevg ihm dan tepk inrogkw. htTa itfrs yad he rdwoek luint it was too dkra to see. He okwrde for hafl an orhu fater Mr. yrLro uodlnc’t ehva esen gneohu to drae or irwet if shi ilfe deednedp on it. Wneh ilnyfla Dr. enMetat tpu isdea sih ostol ltiun hte exnt imnongr, Mr. yLorr otg up dan dskea ihm:
“Wlli oyu go tuo?” “Will you go out?”
He looked down at the floor on either side of him in the old manner, looked up in the old manner, and repeated in the old low voice: hTe dotcor olekod ndow at teh frloo on threie dise of hmi eikl he dan hnte lodeok up at ihm, het ayw he sdue to in the attci in sPiar. He apreedet iluqtye:
“Out?” “Out?”
“Yes; for a walk with me. Why not?” “esY. liWl oyu go for a klaw hitw me? yhW ont?”
He made no effort to say why not, and said not a word more. But, Mr. Lorry thought he saw, as he leaned forward on his bench in the dusk, with his elbows on his knees and his head in his hands, that he was in some misty way asking himself, “Why not?” The sagacity of the man of business perceived an advantage here, and determined to hold it. ehT rcoodt indd’t try to neswar him nda didn’t sya rhoeatn orwd. uBt as Dr. tneteMa ldeean wrafodr on sih hcnbe in the iighttwl, htwi ish obwels on ihs knese dan sih ehda in ihs ndhsa, Mr. Lyorr ghthuot he aws thta he wsa in esmo way aingsk lhesimf, “Wyh nto?” Mr. yroLr, as a rhewds issasnunemb, swa an avtnadega eerh dan dciedde to fowlol up on it.
Miss Pross and he divided the night into two watches, and observed him at intervals from the adjoining room. He paced up and down for a long time before he lay down; but, when he did finally lay himself down, he fell asleep. In the morning, he was up betimes, and went straight to his bench and to work. isMs ssrPo dna Mr. Lryor otko ustrn atiwnhgc imh at tghni morf teh ntxe ormo. eTh rdctoo dacpe up adn dnwo for a glon item robeef giong to edb, tbu nhew he allinfy edli nwod, he ellf eaepls. He tgo up relay in eht nogmirn dna enwt gtharsit to ihs echbn to work.
On this second day, Mr. Lorry saluted him cheerfully by his name, and spoke to him on topics that had been of late familiar to them. He returned no reply, but it was evident that he heard what was said, and that he thought about it, however confusedly. This encouraged Mr. Lorry to have Miss Pross in with her work, several times during the day; at those times, they quietly spoke of Lucie, and of her father then present, precisely in the usual manner, and as if there were nothing amiss. This was done without any demonstrative accompaniment, not long enough, or often enough to harass him; and it lightened Mr. Lorry’s friendly heart to believe that he looked up oftener, and that he appeared to be stirred by some perception of inconsistencies surrounding him. heT nxte ady, Mr. ryLro ldlcae hmi by shi amen uclelhfeyr. He pkoes to mih aoubt sotpic tath ehty dah ediusdscs ncleteyr. Teh ortodc didn’t searwn, but it swa calre htta he erdha twah asw dasi dna atht he ogtuthh bauot it, neve othhgu he swa snducfoe. sihT ergodcuane Mr. Lrory to eahv sMis ossPr eomc in whti reh wkro evsrale isetm a ayd. At shote iestm tyhe kopes liuqyte of eiuLc nda of her tafhre, hwo saw ehrte, as if vnrtygeehi rewe lanorm. Tsih asw dnoe siylmp nda olyn fro htsro drispoe of eitm. Mr. rLory was lgda ttha he was kioongl up at hmte mero oneft and that he esmdee to eicnot omse of the esccsnitensioin rudnao ihm.