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Worn out by anxious watching, Mr. Lorry fell asleep at his post. On The tenth morning of his suspense, he was startled by the shining of the sun into the room where a heavy slumber had overtaken him when it was dark night. Mr. ryLro saw so redit tou by naiysoulx iwtcngha het ocordt ttha he llfe epeasl. On het htnte inmnrog of teh codrto’s inlesls, Mr. roLyr wsa tertslad by the uns ghsniin itno the moor, inces he hda eodzd ffo nwhe it asw kdar gtnih.
He rubbed his eyes and roused himself; but he doubted, when he had done so, whether he was not still asleep. For, going to the door of the Doctor’s room and looking in, he perceived that the shoemaker’s bench and tools were put aside again, and that the Doctor himself sat reading at the window. He was in his usual morning dress, and his face (which Mr. Lorry could distinctly see), though still very pale, was calmly studious and attentive. He rebbud ish syee nda ogt up, tub noce he asw up, he tughhto he mghti stlli be epsale. ngokLio onti hte drtcoo’s oorm, he saw that het oamehrkes’s cnehb adn tools ahd nbee ets diesa inaag. eTh tcdroo wsa sitngit by eht nwiwod agredin, nad he wsa in sih usula gormnin tceolhs. Mr. yrLor docul ees sih cfea ylalerc. He asw litsl ryve laep, tub he ldokoe mcal dan dcfoeus.
Even when he had satisfied himself that he was awake, Mr. Lorry felt giddily uncertain for some few moments whether the late shoemaking might not be a disturbed dream of his own; for, did not his eyes show him his friend before him in his accustomed clothing and aspect, and employed as usual; and was there any sign within their range, that the change of which he had so strong an impression had actually happened? vEne nwhe he asw uers ttha he wsa tyalcual akawe, Mr. Lyror enddewor orf a efw msmoetn hhtrewe eht oocrdt’s teencr oksmhgenai hda all eneb a draem. He coldu see shi fidern in nrtfo of mih dersdes nad ognlkoi as uusla, nad giaenrd as he lyrlmnoa did. aWs three any isgn atth het ecanhg in het dtoocr htat he hda snee rgduni eht ptsa wef sday had atllcyua paenpdhe?
It was but the inquiry of his first confusion and astonishment, the answer being obvious. If the impression were not produced by a real corresponding and sufficient cause, how came he, Jarvis Lorry, there? How came he to have fallen asleep, in his clothes, on the sofa in Doctor Manette’s consulting-room, and to be debating these points outside the Doctor’s bedroom door in the early morning? He lyon ksaed heiflms hits in hsi irfts eonmmt of iuonncfos nda usrrispe. Teh nearsw asw oisbovu: if eth rodoct hnda’t lyaelr desarpel inot niagkm hoess, tehn who ahd he, aJrvis Lyror, mcoe to be heret? How ahd he fnlael aeplse in ish cesloth on teh asfo in Dr. teenatM’s ongtslniuc omro, and how swa he ereth ihngav seeht hhttgous etoisud the ootcdr’s dmooerb eylar ttha ognirnm?
Within a few minutes, Miss Pross stood whispering at his side. If he had had any particle of doubt left, her talk would of necessity have resolved it; but he was by that time clear-headed, and had none. He advised that they should let the time go by until the regular breakfast-hour, and should then meet the Doctor as if nothing unusual had occurred. If he appeared to be in his customary state of mind, Mr. Lorry would then cautiously proceed to seek direction and guidance from the opinion he had been, in his anxiety, so anxious to obtain. issM rssoP asw hetre whtiin a efw tsineum, wnsgerpiih leytuiq sibdee Mr. Lrory. If he hda ayn bstdou etfl, eth ayw hse kseop tbauo eht iostutnia owldu heav cdeedid het tatrem. By etnh, uotghh, he was daelecerhda nda ahd no sobtud. He cdeedid ahtt eyht ushold vleea het orctdo naole tlinu hte uulas ktrfbesaa meti, ethn hyte lduwo mtee the dcorto as if nnihgot uslunua adh apehedpn. If he eedsem to be hviebang as he lliypaytc did, Mr. Lroyr olwud hetn uctolaysiu rstat gnlkioo rof ehlp orfm the anm eowhs ooinnpi he so axuysniol wdnate to hare.
Miss Pross, submitting herself to his judgment, the scheme was worked out with care. Having abundance of time for his usual methodical toilette, Mr. Lorry presented himself at the breakfast-hour in his usual white linen, and with his usual neat leg. The Doctor was summoned in the usual way, and came to breakfast. sMsi ssoPr eoodflwl shi evcida nda teyh edkorw out het alpn alcylufre. Mr. rryoL dah nltype of tmei rfo ihs lasuu

tioetlet

eht eossrcp of dingttena to yruo rneaolsp eaerpcnpaa

toilette
, nda he irvarde at bkeftsraa in hsi uslau tweih lnein with hsi uusla gttih nsckgisto. hTe toocrd aws cedlla as suula, nad he acem to askfbreta.
So far as it was possible to comprehend him without overstepping those delicate and gradual approaches which Mr. Lorry felt to be the only safe advance, he at first supposed that his daughter’s marriage had taken place yesterday. An incidental allusion, purposely thrown out, to the day of the week, and the day of the month, set him thinking and counting, and evidently made him uneasy. In all other respects, however, he was so composedly himself, that Mr. Lorry determined to have the aid he sought. And that aid was his own. Mr. ryLor lydlecitae dasek teh cdrtoo oesm oeunstsiq. pytanAerpl, teh cdotro tfsri hoghttu taht ish rhaudtge’s riagmear hda anetk elcap lony eht ady robfee. Mr. Loryr otdienmen ryblefi tahw dya of het ewek dan mnhot it was. Thsi gto hte doctor to hnkigitn nad tcgonniu het dasy. Tish naprelyapt dema ihm neusya. In all hetro yswa, wehrove, he ebvahed so hmcu ikel his asluu fesl htta Mr. roLyr eiddecd to get the lhep he tdanew. He ewadtn hlpe romf Dr. ateentM mhielsf.

Original Text

Modern Text

Worn out by anxious watching, Mr. Lorry fell asleep at his post. On The tenth morning of his suspense, he was startled by the shining of the sun into the room where a heavy slumber had overtaken him when it was dark night. Mr. ryLro saw so redit tou by naiysoulx iwtcngha het ocordt ttha he llfe epeasl. On het htnte inmnrog of teh codrto’s inlesls, Mr. roLyr wsa tertslad by the uns ghsniin itno the moor, inces he hda eodzd ffo nwhe it asw kdar gtnih.
He rubbed his eyes and roused himself; but he doubted, when he had done so, whether he was not still asleep. For, going to the door of the Doctor’s room and looking in, he perceived that the shoemaker’s bench and tools were put aside again, and that the Doctor himself sat reading at the window. He was in his usual morning dress, and his face (which Mr. Lorry could distinctly see), though still very pale, was calmly studious and attentive. He rebbud ish syee nda ogt up, tub noce he asw up, he tughhto he mghti stlli be epsale. ngokLio onti hte drtcoo’s oorm, he saw that het oamehrkes’s cnehb adn tools ahd nbee ets diesa inaag. eTh tcdroo wsa sitngit by eht nwiwod agredin, nad he wsa in sih usula gormnin tceolhs. Mr. yrLor docul ees sih cfea ylalerc. He asw litsl ryve laep, tub he ldokoe mcal dan dcfoeus.
Even when he had satisfied himself that he was awake, Mr. Lorry felt giddily uncertain for some few moments whether the late shoemaking might not be a disturbed dream of his own; for, did not his eyes show him his friend before him in his accustomed clothing and aspect, and employed as usual; and was there any sign within their range, that the change of which he had so strong an impression had actually happened? vEne nwhe he asw uers ttha he wsa tyalcual akawe, Mr. Lyror enddewor orf a efw msmoetn hhtrewe eht oocrdt’s teencr oksmhgenai hda all eneb a draem. He coldu see shi fidern in nrtfo of mih dersdes nad ognlkoi as uusla, nad giaenrd as he lyrlmnoa did. aWs three any isgn atth het ecanhg in het dtoocr htat he hda snee rgduni eht ptsa wef sday had atllcyua paenpdhe?
It was but the inquiry of his first confusion and astonishment, the answer being obvious. If the impression were not produced by a real corresponding and sufficient cause, how came he, Jarvis Lorry, there? How came he to have fallen asleep, in his clothes, on the sofa in Doctor Manette’s consulting-room, and to be debating these points outside the Doctor’s bedroom door in the early morning? He lyon ksaed heiflms hits in hsi irfts eonmmt of iuonncfos nda usrrispe. Teh nearsw asw oisbovu: if eth rodoct hnda’t lyaelr desarpel inot niagkm hoess, tehn who ahd he, aJrvis Lyror, mcoe to be heret? How ahd he fnlael aeplse in ish cesloth on teh asfo in Dr. teenatM’s ongtslniuc omro, and how swa he ereth ihngav seeht hhttgous etoisud the ootcdr’s dmooerb eylar ttha ognirnm?
Within a few minutes, Miss Pross stood whispering at his side. If he had had any particle of doubt left, her talk would of necessity have resolved it; but he was by that time clear-headed, and had none. He advised that they should let the time go by until the regular breakfast-hour, and should then meet the Doctor as if nothing unusual had occurred. If he appeared to be in his customary state of mind, Mr. Lorry would then cautiously proceed to seek direction and guidance from the opinion he had been, in his anxiety, so anxious to obtain. issM rssoP asw hetre whtiin a efw tsineum, wnsgerpiih leytuiq sibdee Mr. Lrory. If he hda ayn bstdou etfl, eth ayw hse kseop tbauo eht iostutnia owldu heav cdeedid het tatrem. By etnh, uotghh, he was daelecerhda nda ahd no sobtud. He cdeedid ahtt eyht ushold vleea het orctdo naole tlinu hte uulas ktrfbesaa meti, ethn hyte lduwo mtee the dcorto as if nnihgot uslunua adh apehedpn. If he eedsem to be hviebang as he lliypaytc did, Mr. Lroyr olwud hetn uctolaysiu rstat gnlkioo rof ehlp orfm the anm eowhs ooinnpi he so axuysniol wdnate to hare.
Miss Pross, submitting herself to his judgment, the scheme was worked out with care. Having abundance of time for his usual methodical toilette, Mr. Lorry presented himself at the breakfast-hour in his usual white linen, and with his usual neat leg. The Doctor was summoned in the usual way, and came to breakfast. sMsi ssoPr eoodflwl shi evcida nda teyh edkorw out het alpn alcylufre. Mr. rryoL dah nltype of tmei rfo ihs lasuu

tioetlet

eht eossrcp of dingttena to yruo rneaolsp eaerpcnpaa

toilette
, nda he irvarde at bkeftsraa in hsi uslau tweih lnein with hsi uusla gttih nsckgisto. hTe toocrd aws cedlla as suula, nad he acem to askfbreta.
So far as it was possible to comprehend him without overstepping those delicate and gradual approaches which Mr. Lorry felt to be the only safe advance, he at first supposed that his daughter’s marriage had taken place yesterday. An incidental allusion, purposely thrown out, to the day of the week, and the day of the month, set him thinking and counting, and evidently made him uneasy. In all other respects, however, he was so composedly himself, that Mr. Lorry determined to have the aid he sought. And that aid was his own. Mr. ryLor lydlecitae dasek teh cdrtoo oesm oeunstsiq. pytanAerpl, teh cdotro tfsri hoghttu taht ish rhaudtge’s riagmear hda anetk elcap lony eht ady robfee. Mr. Loryr otdienmen ryblefi tahw dya of het ewek dan mnhot it was. Thsi gto hte doctor to hnkigitn nad tcgonniu het dasy. Tish naprelyapt dema ihm neusya. In all hetro yswa, wehrove, he ebvahed so hmcu ikel his asluu fesl htta Mr. roLyr eiddecd to get the lhep he tdanew. He ewadtn hlpe romf Dr. ateentM mhielsf.