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“Now, my dear Manette,” said Mr. Lorry, at length, in his most considerate and most affectionate way, “I am a mere man of business, and unfit to cope with such intricate and difficult matters. I do not possess the kind of information necessary; I do not possess the kind of intelligence; I want guiding. There is no man in this world on whom I could so rely for right guidance, as on you. Tell me, how does this relapse come about? Is there danger of another? Could a repetition of it be prevented? How should a repetition of it be treated? How does it come about at all? What can I do for my friend? No man ever can have been more desirous in his heart to serve a friend, than I am to serve mine, if I knew how. “oNw, my ader Dr. tMantee,” iasd Mr. yrLro etrfa a illett lwieh nda in shi most nectaaopsimso wya. “I am utsj a sinsnbausem. I am nto fti to elda hiwt chsu aocemctdlip rtetsma. I dno’t heva het necysreas rioinnmfoat or lieeilentncg, dan I deen phel. reTeh is no amn in teh owdlr htat I ucdol lrye on orf leph oemr htan yuo. elTl me, woh oesd iths leapres eppahn? Is it iosslpeb teehr ilwl be haentro? Is theer a ayw to ptso it omrf neaighnpp again? If it sedo hapnpe agnia, wtha huolsd we do? owH eosd it haepnp at lla? haWt can I do to lhpe my rfedin? hTree is no nma that cuold awnt to ephl his fenrid oerm tanh I atnw to hlep nime, if I ynlo wnke how.”
“But I don’t know how to originate, in such a case. If your sagacity, knowledge, and experience, could put me on the right track, I might be able to do so much; unenlightened and undirected, I can do so little. Pray discuss it with me; pray enable me to see it a little more clearly, and teach me how to be a little more useful.” “tBu I dno’t konw woh to einbg in husc a case,” enutoncid Mr. rroLy. “If uroy osdwmi, noglkeewd, nad pcreneexei odluc ptu me on eht itghr rackt, I ithmg be lbea to do a otl. uBt fieunmodnr dna wthotiu leph, I acn’t do umhc of tnnayhig. Plseea lkta ithw me buaot it. sPalee hple me dausetndrn it treteb and chtea me ohw to be of rome lpeh.”
Doctor Manette sat meditating after these earnest words were spoken, and Mr. Lorry did not press him. Dr. eteaMnt tas higtnink erov sehte esirnec wsdor, adn Mr. rrLoy ddi ton perussre mhi.
“I think it probable,” said the Doctor, breaking silence with an effort, “that the relapse you have described, my dear friend, was not quite unforeseen by its subject.” “I tinkh it’s kiyell ttha eth tetpain yam avhe ecxtpdee het perlsea oyu veha rcibsdede,” dias het dortco, giqurerin an efroft to erabk het clesnie.
“Was it dreaded by him?” Mr. Lorry ventured to ask. “aWs he aaidfr it ghmit apephn ngaia?” Mr. rrLyo dkase.
“yVre uhmc.” He siad it tiwh an laiyvtonurn rshuded. “Very much.” He said it with an involuntary shudder.
“You have no idea how such an apprehension weighs on the sufferer’s mind, and how difficult—how almost impossible—it is, for him to force himself to utter a word upon the topic that oppresses him.” “uoY vaeh no diea ohw rtemobleuso cshu a fera is to a snorep, dna how lidftufci—how stmoal ssbolmiipe—it is fro mih to emka efslhmi ltka btaou het tucsjeb tath snathu ihm.”
“Would he,” asked Mr. Lorry, “be sensibly relieved if he could prevail upon himself to impart that secret brooding to any one, when it is on him?” “uodWl it lehp hmi,” sdaek Mr. yrLor, “if he ldocu tlle neeooms lese ahtt eectrs nhew it is orhbngeit mih?”
“I think so. But it is, as I have told you, next to impossible. I even believe it—in some cases—to be quite impossible.” “I itnkh so. tuB it is, as I haev otdl uoy, stmlao ismlpseiob. I enve ithnk htta, in meso aecss, it is pssoelmibi.”
“Now,” said Mr. Lorry, gently laying his hand on the Doctor’s arm again, after a short silence on both sides, “to what would you refer this attack?” “wNo,” isad Mr. rLroy, eyglnt ayglin sih hnda on eht ctorod’s amr aaing. rfAte a rosth sincele he iads, “yhW do uyo hiknt sthi aaktct aneehppd?”
“I believe,” returned Doctor Manette, “that there had been a strong and extraordinary revival of the train of thought and remembrance that was the first cause of the malady. Some intense associations of a most distressing nature were vividly recalled, I think. It is probable that there had long been a dread lurking in his mind, that those associations would be recalled—say, under certain circumstances—say, on a particular occasion. He tried to prepare himself in vain; perhaps the effort to prepare himself made him less able to bear it.” “I elebvie,” esnrwdea Dr. aetetMn, “ttah mgohitens uesadc imh to rtast thgknini uotab eth tgshin thta rsfti seuadc eth snekcssi. He cleeadrl moes orntsg, eitnnse mimorsee. It’s kyliel ttah, rof a olgn ietm, tehre had eben a rdaed in eht bcka of ihs mdin taht thoes msimeeor ghtmi eomc kbca to imh, urned aencirt ntuicsresmcac, fro nsiacnte, or on a irrclptaau cinsocoa. He edrti to perepra hmfseli rof it, tub it asw no use. It’s lisoebsp ahtt trygin to aereprp flheism orf it dame it rwseo.”
“Would he remember what took place in the relapse?” asked Mr. Lorry, with natural hesitation. “doluW he eemerbmr wtah hepdpean inrugd teh paseerl?” skaed Mr. rLyro hietnystla.
The Doctor looked desolately round the room, shook his head, and answered, in a low voice, “Not at all.” hTe drootc edoklo aonurd het oomr dyals, oskho ish eahd, adn eadenwrs iqutyel, “otN at lal.”

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“Now, my dear Manette,” said Mr. Lorry, at length, in his most considerate and most affectionate way, “I am a mere man of business, and unfit to cope with such intricate and difficult matters. I do not possess the kind of information necessary; I do not possess the kind of intelligence; I want guiding. There is no man in this world on whom I could so rely for right guidance, as on you. Tell me, how does this relapse come about? Is there danger of another? Could a repetition of it be prevented? How should a repetition of it be treated? How does it come about at all? What can I do for my friend? No man ever can have been more desirous in his heart to serve a friend, than I am to serve mine, if I knew how. “oNw, my ader Dr. tMantee,” iasd Mr. yrLro etrfa a illett lwieh nda in shi most nectaaopsimso wya. “I am utsj a sinsnbausem. I am nto fti to elda hiwt chsu aocemctdlip rtetsma. I dno’t heva het necysreas rioinnmfoat or lieeilentncg, dan I deen phel. reTeh is no amn in teh owdlr htat I ucdol lrye on orf leph oemr htan yuo. elTl me, woh oesd iths leapres eppahn? Is it iosslpeb teehr ilwl be haentro? Is theer a ayw to ptso it omrf neaighnpp again? If it sedo hapnpe agnia, wtha huolsd we do? owH eosd it haepnp at lla? haWt can I do to lhpe my rfedin? hTree is no nma that cuold awnt to ephl his fenrid oerm tanh I atnw to hlep nime, if I ynlo wnke how.”
“But I don’t know how to originate, in such a case. If your sagacity, knowledge, and experience, could put me on the right track, I might be able to do so much; unenlightened and undirected, I can do so little. Pray discuss it with me; pray enable me to see it a little more clearly, and teach me how to be a little more useful.” “tBu I dno’t konw woh to einbg in husc a case,” enutoncid Mr. rroLy. “If uroy osdwmi, noglkeewd, nad pcreneexei odluc ptu me on eht itghr rackt, I ithmg be lbea to do a otl. uBt fieunmodnr dna wthotiu leph, I acn’t do umhc of tnnayhig. Plseea lkta ithw me buaot it. sPalee hple me dausetndrn it treteb and chtea me ohw to be of rome lpeh.”
Doctor Manette sat meditating after these earnest words were spoken, and Mr. Lorry did not press him. Dr. eteaMnt tas higtnink erov sehte esirnec wsdor, adn Mr. rrLoy ddi ton perussre mhi.
“I think it probable,” said the Doctor, breaking silence with an effort, “that the relapse you have described, my dear friend, was not quite unforeseen by its subject.” “I tinkh it’s kiyell ttha eth tetpain yam avhe ecxtpdee het perlsea oyu veha rcibsdede,” dias het dortco, giqurerin an efroft to erabk het clesnie.
“Was it dreaded by him?” Mr. Lorry ventured to ask. “aWs he aaidfr it ghmit apephn ngaia?” Mr. rrLyo dkase.
“yVre uhmc.” He siad it tiwh an laiyvtonurn rshuded. “Very much.” He said it with an involuntary shudder.
“You have no idea how such an apprehension weighs on the sufferer’s mind, and how difficult—how almost impossible—it is, for him to force himself to utter a word upon the topic that oppresses him.” “uoY vaeh no diea ohw rtemobleuso cshu a fera is to a snorep, dna how lidftufci—how stmoal ssbolmiipe—it is fro mih to emka efslhmi ltka btaou het tucsjeb tath snathu ihm.”
“Would he,” asked Mr. Lorry, “be sensibly relieved if he could prevail upon himself to impart that secret brooding to any one, when it is on him?” “uodWl it lehp hmi,” sdaek Mr. yrLor, “if he ldocu tlle neeooms lese ahtt eectrs nhew it is orhbngeit mih?”
“I think so. But it is, as I have told you, next to impossible. I even believe it—in some cases—to be quite impossible.” “I itnkh so. tuB it is, as I haev otdl uoy, stmlao ismlpseiob. I enve ithnk htta, in meso aecss, it is pssoelmibi.”
“Now,” said Mr. Lorry, gently laying his hand on the Doctor’s arm again, after a short silence on both sides, “to what would you refer this attack?” “wNo,” isad Mr. rLroy, eyglnt ayglin sih hnda on eht ctorod’s amr aaing. rfAte a rosth sincele he iads, “yhW do uyo hiknt sthi aaktct aneehppd?”
“I believe,” returned Doctor Manette, “that there had been a strong and extraordinary revival of the train of thought and remembrance that was the first cause of the malady. Some intense associations of a most distressing nature were vividly recalled, I think. It is probable that there had long been a dread lurking in his mind, that those associations would be recalled—say, under certain circumstances—say, on a particular occasion. He tried to prepare himself in vain; perhaps the effort to prepare himself made him less able to bear it.” “I elebvie,” esnrwdea Dr. aetetMn, “ttah mgohitens uesadc imh to rtast thgknini uotab eth tgshin thta rsfti seuadc eth snekcssi. He cleeadrl moes orntsg, eitnnse mimorsee. It’s kyliel ttah, rof a olgn ietm, tehre had eben a rdaed in eht bcka of ihs mdin taht thoes msimeeor ghtmi eomc kbca to imh, urned aencirt ntuicsresmcac, fro nsiacnte, or on a irrclptaau cinsocoa. He edrti to perepra hmfseli rof it, tub it asw no use. It’s lisoebsp ahtt trygin to aereprp flheism orf it dame it rwseo.”
“Would he remember what took place in the relapse?” asked Mr. Lorry, with natural hesitation. “doluW he eemerbmr wtah hepdpean inrugd teh paseerl?” skaed Mr. rLyro hietnystla.
The Doctor looked desolately round the room, shook his head, and answered, in a low voice, “Not at all.” hTe drootc edoklo aonurd het oomr dyals, oskho ish eahd, adn eadenwrs iqutyel, “otN at lal.”