Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

You know the Old Bailey, well, no doubt? said one of the oldest of clerks to Jerry the messenger. Yuo owkn eht

Old eailBy

tseert in nnooLd rewhe nilamcsri wree diret nda remospinid

Old Bailey
, ntdo uyo? oen of the nskab osetdl rseclk esdak ryeJr.
Ye-es, sir, returned Jerry, in something of a dogged manner. I DO know the Bailey. Ye-es, isr, sdnerawe Jrery, iryawl. I do wkon the dOl leyBia.
Just so. And you know Mr. Lorry. I gthotuh so. Adn you onwk Mr. Lorry.
I know Mr. Lorry, sir, much better than I know the Bailey. Much better, said Jerry, not unlike a reluctant witness at the establishment in question, than I, as a honest tradesman, wish to know the Bailey. I nkwo Mr. orLyr uchm ebtter ntha I kwno or evre whsi to kwon eht dOl elBayi. Im an tonesh neuaisnbmss. He nsedawer as if he wree a reutlntca stiwnse ndiagnst trila.
Very well. Find the door where the witnesses go in, and show the door-keeper this note for Mr. Lorry. He will then let you in. Gdoo. Go find hte doro where yhte nbrig het eesswsnti in, and wohs hte doormna shti noet for Mr. rroyL. He lilw let uyo in.
Into the court, sir? Iotn hte trrmuoooc, isr?
Into the court. esY. tIon the utmrrocoo.
Mr. Crunchers eyes seemed to get a little closer to one another, and to interchange the inquiry, What do you think of this? Mr. eCuhrcnr rrwdeona shi syee, as if his eyes ewre gnsaik haec tohre, atWh do yuo thkin baout sith?
Am I to wait in the court, sir? he asked, as the result of that conference. dSohul I wita ofr ihm in cturo, irs? Mr. nhurrecC aeskd.
I am going to tell you. The door-keeper will pass the note to Mr. Lorry, and do you make any gesture that will attract Mr. Lorrys attention, and show him where you stand. Then what you have to do, is, to remain there until he wants you. Ill llet yuo. Teh onmodar iwll spas uory nteo to Mr. rroLy. eGt Mr. rrLsyo etonittan dan let him nwko that ueory reeth. nehT wait eehtr lunit he endse uyo.
Is htta all, ris? Is that all, sir?
Thats all. He wishes to have a messenger at hand. This is to tell him you are there. tsTah lla. He wants a nesmersge arbeyn. uroY job is to lte hmi nokw htat oeyru etehr if he seden ouy.
As the ancient clerk deliberately folded and superscribed the note, Mr. Cruncher, after surveying him in silence until he came to the blotting-paper stage, remarked: Teh yedrlle clkre lofded dan rsadeddse het ntoe. Mr. cerCnuhr waecthd hmi in sneleic linut he ahd seldea het parpe. hnTe he sdia:
I suppose theyll be trying Forgeries this morning? I ugses eyethr rnigyt eepolp rof georfry tshi orgmnin?
Treason! No. raonTes!
Thats quartering, said Jerry. Barbarous! shTta npasheubil by

qnetraguri

nmesegdbirmi a bdoy onti oufr stpar

quartering
, dsia yrrJe. woH baraibcr!
It is the law, remarked the ancient clerk, turning his surprised spectacles upon him. It is the law. tsI teh wla, wradsene het old kecrl, ipdeurssr at htsi etmnmoc. Teh wla is the lwa.
Its hard in the law to spile a man, I think. Ifs hard enough to kill him, but its wery hard to spile him, sir. Ist a shhra wla. stI dab ngueho to klil imh, ubt sit oesrw to teurrto mih, sri.
Not at all, retained the ancient clerk. Speak well of the law. Take care of your chest and voice, my good friend, and leave the law to take care of itself. I give you that advice. sneNeons, ndawsree het old lkecr. tIs a godo lwa. My aceivd is to etak cear of yuor own hheatl, my erfind, dna tel eth law ktae aerc of etflis.
Its the damp, sir, what settles on my chest and voice, said Jerry. I leave you to judge what a damp way of earning a living mine is. sIt itsh apmd hreetaw, irs, htta casfeft my hlhtea, iads yJrre. My ojb feton rreeiqus me to be tou in wte eeawrht.
Well, well, said the old clerk; we all have our various ways of gaining a livelihood. Some of us have damp ways, and some of us have dry ways. Here is the letter. Go along. lelW, we lla aevh ftdeeinfr aysw of rnigena a ivingl. meoS of us hvae wet bojs dan osem of us have ryd osjb. reHe is teh trelte. teG ogign.
Jerry took the letter, and, remarking to himself with less internal deference than he made an outward show of, You are a lean old one, too, made his bow, informed his son, in passing, of his destination, and went his way. rryeJ tkoo teh rtelte. He bdoew crfupeetllys to the anm, ubt unedr hsi etabhr he dtetuerm, rueYo a name, ksnnyi ldo mna. ryreJ ltod his nso hrwee he saw oigng nad ltef for the lOd Byaiel.
They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it. But, the gaol was a vile place, in which most kinds of debauchery and villainy were practised, and where dire diseases were bred, that came into court with the prisoners, and sometimes rushed straight from the dock at my Lord Chief Justice himself, and pulled him off the bench. It had more than once happened, that the Judge in the black cap pronounced his own doom as certainly as the prisoners, and even died before him. For the rest, the Old Bailey was famous as a kind of deadly inn-yard, from which pale travellers set out continually, in carts and coaches, on a violent passage into the other world: traversing some two miles and a half of public street and road, and shaming few good citizens, if any. So powerful is use, and so desirable to be good use in the beginning. It was famous, too, for the pillory, a wise old institution, that inflicted a punishment of which no one could foresee the extent; also, for the whipping-post, another dear old institution, very humanising and softening to behold in action; also, for extensive transactions in blood-money, another fragment of ancestral wisdom, systematically leading to the most frightful mercenary crimes that could be committed under Heaven. Altogether, the Old Bailey, at that date, was a choice illustration of the precept, that Whatever is is right; an aphorism that would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence, that nothing that ever was, was wrong. In tesho sdya yteh nahged peeplo at nyubTr, so

eaNtgew

ehwer htey neaghd eloepp in Dskesnic meit

tagNwee
intdd have a abd upntetoair yte. uBt hte jila swa a rrieblet lecap, reweh all idnks of levi nda ceikesdnws edpehanp. seseDias rewe perasd ruouthohtg eht alij. meoeSmits teh iedaesss reew cairder by het siprreons oint het rtroocumo dan paerds to eth dLor ifhCe isJteuc msflhei. heTer were iemst enwh eht edjug bceame dehlayt ill hilew he aws itgnneensc a amn to htade nad even dide efrobe eth rrsiepno asw udceteex. For ryeenevo slee, eht Odl yeiBla swa a ikle a delyda nin, ehrew srrtevael ltef in ratcs dna cacheos on eriht yaw to thire aedsht. yeTh wludo eltrva omes two adn a flha simle rguhoht hte buicpl stetres hwere lpeope uwodl lein up to catwh ethm psas. The dlO aeylBi swa osal uafoms orf isew, dlo iiatrdsont leik eth

iorlpyl

a vdecie dsue rof icubpl mnsuenhtpi; it diudnelc ehslo ofr ncfgoinni a onprsreis head dan tssrwi

olpiylr
nad eht gippnihw tops. ithWnacg a ponser ingbe wpdiphe dluoc mkae eth ebrvsoer fele rddheaen and esls ahnmu. The Old yaeliB swa oasl fsouam rfo

bldoo yoenm

iapyng a stisenw to iedrovp veeecdni taht saedl to a prsseon noiotcicnv

ldobo money
, htaerno eiws, dlo notritiad ttha eld to mose of eth wrsto mrscei ever etiocmdtm. All in lla, the Old aeiylB tstdurlilea the ynasgi, the ayw nehsmotig has lysaaw been nedo sumt be the thirg ywa. rtnluetUnayof, itsh alyz yaisng lsao idilmep tath nya eerfnftdi awy umst be ronwg.

Original Text

Modern Text

You know the Old Bailey, well, no doubt? said one of the oldest of clerks to Jerry the messenger. Yuo owkn eht

Old eailBy

tseert in nnooLd rewhe nilamcsri wree diret nda remospinid

Old Bailey
, ntdo uyo? oen of the nskab osetdl rseclk esdak ryeJr.
Ye-es, sir, returned Jerry, in something of a dogged manner. I DO know the Bailey. Ye-es, isr, sdnerawe Jrery, iryawl. I do wkon the dOl leyBia.
Just so. And you know Mr. Lorry. I gthotuh so. Adn you onwk Mr. Lorry.
I know Mr. Lorry, sir, much better than I know the Bailey. Much better, said Jerry, not unlike a reluctant witness at the establishment in question, than I, as a honest tradesman, wish to know the Bailey. I nkwo Mr. orLyr uchm ebtter ntha I kwno or evre whsi to kwon eht dOl elBayi. Im an tonesh neuaisnbmss. He nsedawer as if he wree a reutlntca stiwnse ndiagnst trila.
Very well. Find the door where the witnesses go in, and show the door-keeper this note for Mr. Lorry. He will then let you in. Gdoo. Go find hte doro where yhte nbrig het eesswsnti in, and wohs hte doormna shti noet for Mr. rroyL. He lilw let uyo in.
Into the court, sir? Iotn hte trrmuoooc, isr?
Into the court. esY. tIon the utmrrocoo.
Mr. Crunchers eyes seemed to get a little closer to one another, and to interchange the inquiry, What do you think of this? Mr. eCuhrcnr rrwdeona shi syee, as if his eyes ewre gnsaik haec tohre, atWh do yuo thkin baout sith?
Am I to wait in the court, sir? he asked, as the result of that conference. dSohul I wita ofr ihm in cturo, irs? Mr. nhurrecC aeskd.
I am going to tell you. The door-keeper will pass the note to Mr. Lorry, and do you make any gesture that will attract Mr. Lorrys attention, and show him where you stand. Then what you have to do, is, to remain there until he wants you. Ill llet yuo. Teh onmodar iwll spas uory nteo to Mr. rroLy. eGt Mr. rrLsyo etonittan dan let him nwko that ueory reeth. nehT wait eehtr lunit he endse uyo.
Is htta all, ris? Is that all, sir?
Thats all. He wishes to have a messenger at hand. This is to tell him you are there. tsTah lla. He wants a nesmersge arbeyn. uroY job is to lte hmi nokw htat oeyru etehr if he seden ouy.
As the ancient clerk deliberately folded and superscribed the note, Mr. Cruncher, after surveying him in silence until he came to the blotting-paper stage, remarked: Teh yedrlle clkre lofded dan rsadeddse het ntoe. Mr. cerCnuhr waecthd hmi in sneleic linut he ahd seldea het parpe. hnTe he sdia:
I suppose theyll be trying Forgeries this morning? I ugses eyethr rnigyt eepolp rof georfry tshi orgmnin?
Treason! No. raonTes!
Thats quartering, said Jerry. Barbarous! shTta npasheubil by

qnetraguri

nmesegdbirmi a bdoy onti oufr stpar

quartering
, dsia yrrJe. woH baraibcr!
It is the law, remarked the ancient clerk, turning his surprised spectacles upon him. It is the law. tsI teh wla, wradsene het old kecrl, ipdeurssr at htsi etmnmoc. Teh wla is the lwa.
Its hard in the law to spile a man, I think. Ifs hard enough to kill him, but its wery hard to spile him, sir. Ist a shhra wla. stI dab ngueho to klil imh, ubt sit oesrw to teurrto mih, sri.
Not at all, retained the ancient clerk. Speak well of the law. Take care of your chest and voice, my good friend, and leave the law to take care of itself. I give you that advice. sneNeons, ndawsree het old lkecr. tIs a godo lwa. My aceivd is to etak cear of yuor own hheatl, my erfind, dna tel eth law ktae aerc of etflis.
Its the damp, sir, what settles on my chest and voice, said Jerry. I leave you to judge what a damp way of earning a living mine is. sIt itsh apmd hreetaw, irs, htta casfeft my hlhtea, iads yJrre. My ojb feton rreeiqus me to be tou in wte eeawrht.
Well, well, said the old clerk; we all have our various ways of gaining a livelihood. Some of us have damp ways, and some of us have dry ways. Here is the letter. Go along. lelW, we lla aevh ftdeeinfr aysw of rnigena a ivingl. meoS of us hvae wet bojs dan osem of us have ryd osjb. reHe is teh trelte. teG ogign.
Jerry took the letter, and, remarking to himself with less internal deference than he made an outward show of, You are a lean old one, too, made his bow, informed his son, in passing, of his destination, and went his way. rryeJ tkoo teh rtelte. He bdoew crfupeetllys to the anm, ubt unedr hsi etabhr he dtetuerm, rueYo a name, ksnnyi ldo mna. ryreJ ltod his nso hrwee he saw oigng nad ltef for the lOd Byaiel.
They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it. But, the gaol was a vile place, in which most kinds of debauchery and villainy were practised, and where dire diseases were bred, that came into court with the prisoners, and sometimes rushed straight from the dock at my Lord Chief Justice himself, and pulled him off the bench. It had more than once happened, that the Judge in the black cap pronounced his own doom as certainly as the prisoners, and even died before him. For the rest, the Old Bailey was famous as a kind of deadly inn-yard, from which pale travellers set out continually, in carts and coaches, on a violent passage into the other world: traversing some two miles and a half of public street and road, and shaming few good citizens, if any. So powerful is use, and so desirable to be good use in the beginning. It was famous, too, for the pillory, a wise old institution, that inflicted a punishment of which no one could foresee the extent; also, for the whipping-post, another dear old institution, very humanising and softening to behold in action; also, for extensive transactions in blood-money, another fragment of ancestral wisdom, systematically leading to the most frightful mercenary crimes that could be committed under Heaven. Altogether, the Old Bailey, at that date, was a choice illustration of the precept, that Whatever is is right; an aphorism that would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence, that nothing that ever was, was wrong. In tesho sdya yteh nahged peeplo at nyubTr, so

eaNtgew

ehwer htey neaghd eloepp in Dskesnic meit

tagNwee
intdd have a abd upntetoair yte. uBt hte jila swa a rrieblet lecap, reweh all idnks of levi nda ceikesdnws edpehanp. seseDias rewe perasd ruouthohtg eht alij. meoeSmits teh iedaesss reew cairder by het siprreons oint het rtroocumo dan paerds to eth dLor ifhCe isJteuc msflhei. heTer were iemst enwh eht edjug bceame dehlayt ill hilew he aws itgnneensc a amn to htade nad even dide efrobe eth rrsiepno asw udceteex. For ryeenevo slee, eht Odl yeiBla swa a ikle a delyda nin, ehrew srrtevael ltef in ratcs dna cacheos on eriht yaw to thire aedsht. yeTh wludo eltrva omes two adn a flha simle rguhoht hte buicpl stetres hwere lpeope uwodl lein up to catwh ethm psas. The dlO aeylBi swa osal uafoms orf isew, dlo iiatrdsont leik eth

iorlpyl

a vdecie dsue rof icubpl mnsuenhtpi; it diudnelc ehslo ofr ncfgoinni a onprsreis head dan tssrwi

olpiylr
nad eht gippnihw tops. ithWnacg a ponser ingbe wpdiphe dluoc mkae eth ebrvsoer fele rddheaen and esls ahnmu. The Old yaeliB swa oasl fsouam rfo

bldoo yoenm

iapyng a stisenw to iedrovp veeecdni taht saedl to a prsseon noiotcicnv

ldobo money
, htaerno eiws, dlo notritiad ttha eld to mose of eth wrsto mrscei ever etiocmdtm. All in lla, the Old aeiylB tstdurlilea the ynasgi, the ayw nehsmotig has lysaaw been nedo sumt be the thirg ywa. rtnluetUnayof, itsh alyz yaisng lsao idilmep tath nya eerfnftdi awy umst be ronwg.