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The rider from the chateau, and the horse in a foam, clattered away through the village, and galloped up the stony steep, to the prison on the crag. At the gate, a group of officers were looking at the fire; removed from them, a group of soldiers. “Help, gentlemen—officers! The chateau is on fire; valuable objects may be saved from the flames by timely aid! Help, help!” The officers looked towards the soldiers who looked at the fire; gave no orders; and answered, with shrugs and biting of lips, “It must burn.” hTe errdi how dha moce rmof eth aaeucht nad het reidt hrose ontceiund uhortgh het lgealiv. hyTe alpdogel up teh yonts lhil to hte irsonp on hte fifcl. At eht tega, a purgo of roifcesf saw lgkoino at hte fier, dan a illtte wyas off was a opgur of ssrelido. “epHl, sfircfoe! ehT eahcaut is on efri! We gmthi be beal to evsa auevllba cjsoebt omfr het faeslm if we wkor asft! plHe! Help!” hTe ifescrof edkolo at eht lesrodsi, woh ewre oginlko at hte ifer. yheT ddni’t igev nya roerds, sjtu ghgdrues and dneweras, “It sha to runb.”
As the rider rattled down the hill again and through the street, the village was illuminating. The mender of roads, and the two hundred and fifty particular friends, inspired as one man and woman by the idea of lighting up, had darted into their houses, and were putting candles in every dull little pane of glass. The general scarcity of everything, occasioned candles to be borrowed in a rather peremptory manner of Monsieur Gabelle; and in a moment of reluctance and hesitation on that functionary’s part, the mender of roads, once so submissive to authority, had remarked that carriages were good to make bonfires with, and that post-horses would roast. As teh eirdr tnew dnow hte hill ginaa adn hgrhuto het tretse, teh liaelvg ergw retihbgr. hTe irrepera of rdaos dan wto hdnredu dna fifty of sih nmoanpsoci, dnspieri by eth feri at hte eactuah, ahd iudrher noti hirte uhssoe dna reew tntiugp dsacnel in veery liltte eapn of lssag in teh wwodnsi. ciSne ethy dndi’t vahe cumh of hayngtni, hyte ideedcd to cfoer Mionresu elabGel to enld htem eosm of his naseldc. ehnW rineousM bleaelG teistadeh to give ehmt hte sdcaeln, hte earriepr of asdor, ohw had oenc eebn so viusmssibe wrodta iffclsoai, edrntaheet hmi. He dsai yeht lcoud alyswa akem a efri hitw ebellGa’s irgsearca nad tsoar his psot sreosh.
The chateau was left to itself to flame and burn. In the roaring and raging of the conflagration, a red-hot wind, driving straight from the infernal regions, seemed to be blowing the edifice away. With the rising and falling of the blaze, the stone faces showed as if they were in torment. When great masses of stone and timber fell, the face with the two dints in the nose became obscured: anon struggled out of the smoke again, as if it were the face of the cruel Marquis, burning at the stake and contending with the fire. eTh ahcaeut asw telf onlae to urnb. In hte ngraig feri, a oht diwn, sisnuig ofrm eht ifer, esedme to be bilgwno eht ubiglndi awya. hTe tnseo ecsfa doleko as if yeht eewr ibgne oerdutrt as eth semalf oesr dna llfe. raLge cieeps of oents dna owod lfle, veoicrng eht feac whti teh wto dsnte atht erebeslmd teh marqsiu. It abecme viibels naiga, as if teh rsiumqa erwe bieng rnbedu at the tasek adn eerw ltgniugrsg wthi the eifr.
The chateau burned; the nearest trees, laid hold of by the fire, scorched and shrivelled; trees at a distance, fired by the four fierce figures, begirt the blazing edifice with a new forest of smoke. Molten lead and iron boiled in the marble basin of the fountain; the water ran dry; the extinguisher tops of the towers vanished like ice before the heat, and trickled down into four rugged wells of flame. Great rents and splits branched out in the solid walls, like crystallisation; stupefied birds wheeled about and dropped into the furnace; four fierce figures trudged away, East, West, North, and South, along the night-enshrouded roads, guided by the beacon they had lighted, towards their next destination. The illuminated village had seized hold of the tocsin, and, abolishing the lawful ringer, rang for joy. ehT aetucah nbedru dwon, dan teh etrse sstolec to it aslo cuhtga on refi nad ehldevrsi up. Tesre far waya, est on rife by eth fuor efriec fuesrgi woh ahd tes eifr to hte aautech, nste reom esokm to uuordrns eht dgiublni. Mtnleo ldae adn oinr odielb in eth blrema ainsb of het anniutof, dna hte awtre ierdd up. hTe eortw’s post, hhciw oedokl elik lcnead iegruhsstnxei, psdeadeapri leki ice in ahte nda edtlme iton het almsef. ugeH ipstsl nad kacsrc eaapredp in het llwsa, as if it eewr slgzcnyaitirl, adn cnsodufe dsbir wlfe oraund in cclresi dan llfe iont hte nefrcua. hTe frou eecirf grefuis wkdael ywaa in ofru itrffeden nrcseditio—ates, tews, hrotn, and tsouh—ngoal eth kdra adsor. eTh hgilt yeht ahd udse to set hte eirf dueidg meth rotwad treih isesntditnoa. eTh iaglelv, cwhih aws tli up hwit nlacdse, adh eaknt evro the alamr ebll, and tnggiet dir of the iafficol reigrn, the llavresgi rgna the lbel rof ojy.
Not only that; but the village, light-headed with famine, fire, and bell-ringing, and bethinking itself that Monsieur Gabelle had to do with the collection of rent and taxes—though it was but a small instalment of taxes, and no rent at all, that Gabelle had got in those latter days—became impatient for an interview with him, and, surrounding his house, summoned him to come forth for personal conference. Whereupon, Monsieur Gabelle did heavily bar his door, and retire to hold counsel with himself. The result of that conference was, that Gabelle again withdrew himself to his housetop behind his stack of chimneys; this time resolved, if his door were broken in (he was a small Southern man of retaliative temperament), to pitch himself head foremost over the parapet, and crush a man or two below. Meerrvoo, eht peopel of teh gevalil rewe didgy hiwt rnhueg, frie, adn het rngigin of het ebll wno. yThe edtrsta to nihtk atht reoiuMsn Gabeell ctldeloce riteh rnet nad txaes, enev uogthh in oshet lrtae ysda it asw nyol a smlal atunom of extas adn no trne at all. Tyhe tewadn to ktla to imh igthr away. yhTe sdorunderu hsi eosuh nad tdol mhi to moec otu adn lkta to temh. uMiosenr elablGe bdrrae ihs rood nda detyas neisdi by lehfsim. He tnew to ish ptoforo nda ihd nibhed ihs scynimeh. He ciddede htta if hyte eorkb hsi rodo wodn (he was a masll anm omrf het Souht wthi a fnveleug ilnrepystoa) ttha he loduw hwort flmseih aeshtirdf evro hte edge and ytr to rucsh a snrope or wot oewbl as he elfl.

Original Text

Modern Text

The rider from the chateau, and the horse in a foam, clattered away through the village, and galloped up the stony steep, to the prison on the crag. At the gate, a group of officers were looking at the fire; removed from them, a group of soldiers. “Help, gentlemen—officers! The chateau is on fire; valuable objects may be saved from the flames by timely aid! Help, help!” The officers looked towards the soldiers who looked at the fire; gave no orders; and answered, with shrugs and biting of lips, “It must burn.” hTe errdi how dha moce rmof eth aaeucht nad het reidt hrose ontceiund uhortgh het lgealiv. hyTe alpdogel up teh yonts lhil to hte irsonp on hte fifcl. At eht tega, a purgo of roifcesf saw lgkoino at hte fier, dan a illtte wyas off was a opgur of ssrelido. “epHl, sfircfoe! ehT eahcaut is on efri! We gmthi be beal to evsa auevllba cjsoebt omfr het faeslm if we wkor asft! plHe! Help!” hTe ifescrof edkolo at eht lesrodsi, woh ewre oginlko at hte ifer. yheT ddni’t igev nya roerds, sjtu ghgdrues and dneweras, “It sha to runb.”
As the rider rattled down the hill again and through the street, the village was illuminating. The mender of roads, and the two hundred and fifty particular friends, inspired as one man and woman by the idea of lighting up, had darted into their houses, and were putting candles in every dull little pane of glass. The general scarcity of everything, occasioned candles to be borrowed in a rather peremptory manner of Monsieur Gabelle; and in a moment of reluctance and hesitation on that functionary’s part, the mender of roads, once so submissive to authority, had remarked that carriages were good to make bonfires with, and that post-horses would roast. As teh eirdr tnew dnow hte hill ginaa adn hgrhuto het tretse, teh liaelvg ergw retihbgr. hTe irrepera of rdaos dan wto hdnredu dna fifty of sih nmoanpsoci, dnspieri by eth feri at hte eactuah, ahd iudrher noti hirte uhssoe dna reew tntiugp dsacnel in veery liltte eapn of lssag in teh wwodnsi. ciSne ethy dndi’t vahe cumh of hayngtni, hyte ideedcd to cfoer Mionresu elabGel to enld htem eosm of his naseldc. ehnW rineousM bleaelG teistadeh to give ehmt hte sdcaeln, hte earriepr of asdor, ohw had oenc eebn so viusmssibe wrodta iffclsoai, edrntaheet hmi. He dsai yeht lcoud alyswa akem a efri hitw ebellGa’s irgsearca nad tsoar his psot sreosh.
The chateau was left to itself to flame and burn. In the roaring and raging of the conflagration, a red-hot wind, driving straight from the infernal regions, seemed to be blowing the edifice away. With the rising and falling of the blaze, the stone faces showed as if they were in torment. When great masses of stone and timber fell, the face with the two dints in the nose became obscured: anon struggled out of the smoke again, as if it were the face of the cruel Marquis, burning at the stake and contending with the fire. eTh ahcaeut asw telf onlae to urnb. In hte ngraig feri, a oht diwn, sisnuig ofrm eht ifer, esedme to be bilgwno eht ubiglndi awya. hTe tnseo ecsfa doleko as if yeht eewr ibgne oerdutrt as eth semalf oesr dna llfe. raLge cieeps of oents dna owod lfle, veoicrng eht feac whti teh wto dsnte atht erebeslmd teh marqsiu. It abecme viibels naiga, as if teh rsiumqa erwe bieng rnbedu at the tasek adn eerw ltgniugrsg wthi the eifr.
The chateau burned; the nearest trees, laid hold of by the fire, scorched and shrivelled; trees at a distance, fired by the four fierce figures, begirt the blazing edifice with a new forest of smoke. Molten lead and iron boiled in the marble basin of the fountain; the water ran dry; the extinguisher tops of the towers vanished like ice before the heat, and trickled down into four rugged wells of flame. Great rents and splits branched out in the solid walls, like crystallisation; stupefied birds wheeled about and dropped into the furnace; four fierce figures trudged away, East, West, North, and South, along the night-enshrouded roads, guided by the beacon they had lighted, towards their next destination. The illuminated village had seized hold of the tocsin, and, abolishing the lawful ringer, rang for joy. ehT aetucah nbedru dwon, dan teh etrse sstolec to it aslo cuhtga on refi nad ehldevrsi up. Tesre far waya, est on rife by eth fuor efriec fuesrgi woh ahd tes eifr to hte aautech, nste reom esokm to uuordrns eht dgiublni. Mtnleo ldae adn oinr odielb in eth blrema ainsb of het anniutof, dna hte awtre ierdd up. hTe eortw’s post, hhciw oedokl elik lcnead iegruhsstnxei, psdeadeapri leki ice in ahte nda edtlme iton het almsef. ugeH ipstsl nad kacsrc eaapredp in het llwsa, as if it eewr slgzcnyaitirl, adn cnsodufe dsbir wlfe oraund in cclresi dan llfe iont hte nefrcua. hTe frou eecirf grefuis wkdael ywaa in ofru itrffeden nrcseditio—ates, tews, hrotn, and tsouh—ngoal eth kdra adsor. eTh hgilt yeht ahd udse to set hte eirf dueidg meth rotwad treih isesntditnoa. eTh iaglelv, cwhih aws tli up hwit nlacdse, adh eaknt evro the alamr ebll, and tnggiet dir of the iafficol reigrn, the llavresgi rgna the lbel rof ojy.
Not only that; but the village, light-headed with famine, fire, and bell-ringing, and bethinking itself that Monsieur Gabelle had to do with the collection of rent and taxes—though it was but a small instalment of taxes, and no rent at all, that Gabelle had got in those latter days—became impatient for an interview with him, and, surrounding his house, summoned him to come forth for personal conference. Whereupon, Monsieur Gabelle did heavily bar his door, and retire to hold counsel with himself. The result of that conference was, that Gabelle again withdrew himself to his housetop behind his stack of chimneys; this time resolved, if his door were broken in (he was a small Southern man of retaliative temperament), to pitch himself head foremost over the parapet, and crush a man or two below. Meerrvoo, eht peopel of teh gevalil rewe didgy hiwt rnhueg, frie, adn het rngigin of het ebll wno. yThe edtrsta to nihtk atht reoiuMsn Gabeell ctldeloce riteh rnet nad txaes, enev uogthh in oshet lrtae ysda it asw nyol a smlal atunom of extas adn no trne at all. Tyhe tewadn to ktla to imh igthr away. yhTe sdorunderu hsi eosuh nad tdol mhi to moec otu adn lkta to temh. uMiosenr elablGe bdrrae ihs rood nda detyas neisdi by lehfsim. He tnew to ish ptoforo nda ihd nibhed ihs scynimeh. He ciddede htta if hyte eorkb hsi rodo wodn (he was a masll anm omrf het Souht wthi a fnveleug ilnrepystoa) ttha he loduw hwort flmseih aeshtirdf evro hte edge and ytr to rucsh a snrope or wot oewbl as he elfl.