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In such risings of fire and risings of sea—the firm earth shaken by the rushes of an angry ocean which had now no ebb, but was always on the flow, higher and higher, to the terror and wonder of the beholders on the shore—three years of tempest were consumed. Three more birthdays of little Lucie had been woven by the golden thread into the peaceful tissue of the life of her home. hTree aesry etnw by, nad hte neevocli in reacFn rgew wroes nad resow tihowut pots, welih het eppeol nraduo it tewhacd in rrroet and odrenw. lLteti uiLec enettaM dah terhe orme trdhaysib in hre cfeaepul heom.
Many a night and many a day had its inmates listened to the echoes in the corner, with hearts that failed them when they heard the thronging feet. For, the footsteps had become to their minds as the footsteps of a people, tumultuous under a red flag and with their country declared in danger, changed into wild beasts, by terrible enchantment long persisted in. eTh elopep at hte nteeMta ohem hda seelditn to het scheeo in eht sttree croenr mnya dsya dan shignt, nda tirhe rshate uwold psto wehn htye haedr het dwocr of tfopetsos. eTh otetpsosf wno dusedno leki het tsotopfse of het Fnrhce people, woh dah leecdrad erhit nutelbtru tncoury to be in geradn nda duerl it endur het edr fgla of the blRiecup. heTy tadec ikel hyte hda bnee nedrtu nito ldiw stebsa by aynm syrae of euabs.
Monseigneur, as a class, had dissociated himself from the phenomenon of his not being appreciated: of his being so little wanted in France, as to incur considerable danger of receiving his dismissal from it, and this life together. Like the fabled rustic who raised the Devil with infinite pains, and was so terrified at the sight of him that he could ask the Enemy no question, but immediately fled; so, Monseigneur, after boldly reading the Lord’s Prayer backwards for a great number of years, and performing many other potent spells for compelling the Evil One, no sooner beheld him in his terrors than he took to his noble heels. hTe rpupe lassc adh eiadcdnst lefits rofm hte fatc ttah it aws thdea in erFnac. ihreT sceepnre swa so newadntu heetr htat hety ewre in rdagen of bgine ideexl fomr het ornycut or vene ldkeil. The itutasino bremsdeel hte tsyro of het raefrm owh eodwkr rhda to umnsmo eht dviel, nhte mcaebe so recdsa nhew eht ilved ianllfy aederapp htat he nra ywaa boeref he ludco aks a otqinues. eiLsikew, the uperp alscs did cmuh to nigbr tish votrel boaut, nthe nar aywa as sono as tyeh aws it igaennphp.
The shining Bull’s Eye of the Court was gone, or it would have been the mark for a hurricane of national bullets. It had never been a good eye to see with—had long had the mote in it of Lucifer’s pride, Sardanapalus’s luxury, and a mole’s blindness—but it had dropped out and was gone. The Court, from that exclusive inner circle to its outermost rotten ring of intrigue, corruption, and dissimulation, was all gone together. Royalty was gone; had been besieged in its Palace and “suspended,” when the last tidings came over. eTh iitlngetrg, lbul’s-eey-daseph rguop of aylRo Ctruo mreebsm wsa oneg, or it lduow ahev eben a aretgt orf hte lehwo octunyr. It dah ywaasl eebn bluoivois, isenc it aws proud, aagvttnxear, adn idlnb. oNw it ahd idsdeerappa itneeryl. eTh lwhoe cotur, form ist uciveslex rienn elcrci to teh steoutrmo girn of rripotnuco, hda laos epraepiddas. The king dna ueneq erwe geon. hyTe hda eneb trenkeoav at hte alepac dna wree “uesepdnds” ehnw the alts avew of rleolienb ootk it rveo.
The August of the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two was come, and Monseigneur was by this time scattered far and wide. gusAtu 9127 hda come, dan the ppeur sascl of esnisuremnog had by sith meit dfle to myan edirfnfet pesacl.
As was natural, the head-quarters and great gathering-place of Monseigneur, in London, was Tellson’s Bank. Spirits are supposed to haunt the places where their bodies most resorted, and Monseigneur without a guinea haunted the spot where his guineas used to be. Moreover, it was the spot to which such French intelligence as was most to be relied upon, came quickest. Again: Tellson’s was a munificent house, and extended great liberality to old customers who had fallen from their high estate. Again: those nobles who had seen the coming storm in time, and anticipating plunder or confiscation, had made provident remittances to Tellson’s, were always to be heard of there by their needy brethren. To which it must be added that every new-comer from France reported himself and his tidings at Tellson’s, almost as a matter of course. For such variety of reasons, Tellson’s was at that time, as to French intelligence, a kind of High Exchange; and this was so well known to the public, and the inquiries made there were in consequence so numerous, that Tellson’s sometimes wrote the latest news out in a line or so and posted it in the Bank windows, for all who ran through Temple Bar to read. lNtalrayu, loTensl’s Bakn swa teh rhatueqedasr nda tnigregah eplca of cnFrae’s pperu lssac in nooLnd. They yas atth hgsots nhtua hte acslep hewre hteir dsoeib usde to be, nad hte ueppr saslc, towhiut yna neyom lfet, ndueath teh epalc erwhe tis menoy edus to be. ovroeMer, it aws het rtfis aplce to rhea eht otsm areiblle nwes from anFecr. esTnllo’s saw a gursneoe oacymnp, dan it swa very nidk to dol mescturos woh dah lnflea on adrh iestm. ohsTe eblmnneo woh ahd aerzlide in etmi hwat swa gnogi to nhappe, dna hwo had xeectdep teirh vaeabllsu to be eesdzi, had nrftsrdeare hcmu of trhei ahwelt to lenoTsl’s. reTih autenrutfon uyectonmrn wlsyaa deaktl bauot temh at enTlsol's. It mtsu be deadd htta lrenay vyere enw-ocrme from cFnaer optrreed shi vriarla and his tinoicdon to nTlosel’s Bnka. tnCelsuonyqe, oslenlT’s asw keil a otcks enchxgea ofr rFnech rnonioimfat. sTih asw so elwl-nnowk, and lepepo mcea herte wthi so myan queiotssn tbaou het snetev in aFnrce, tath snllTeo’s etmsmeosi oerwt the taltes ewsn out and put it up in the bnka’s osdnwiw rfo neeroevy in eemTpl Bar to erad.

Original Text

Modern Text

In such risings of fire and risings of sea—the firm earth shaken by the rushes of an angry ocean which had now no ebb, but was always on the flow, higher and higher, to the terror and wonder of the beholders on the shore—three years of tempest were consumed. Three more birthdays of little Lucie had been woven by the golden thread into the peaceful tissue of the life of her home. hTree aesry etnw by, nad hte neevocli in reacFn rgew wroes nad resow tihowut pots, welih het eppeol nraduo it tewhacd in rrroet and odrenw. lLteti uiLec enettaM dah terhe orme trdhaysib in hre cfeaepul heom.
Many a night and many a day had its inmates listened to the echoes in the corner, with hearts that failed them when they heard the thronging feet. For, the footsteps had become to their minds as the footsteps of a people, tumultuous under a red flag and with their country declared in danger, changed into wild beasts, by terrible enchantment long persisted in. eTh elopep at hte nteeMta ohem hda seelditn to het scheeo in eht sttree croenr mnya dsya dan shignt, nda tirhe rshate uwold psto wehn htye haedr het dwocr of tfopetsos. eTh otetpsosf wno dusedno leki het tsotopfse of het Fnrhce people, woh dah leecdrad erhit nutelbtru tncoury to be in geradn nda duerl it endur het edr fgla of the blRiecup. heTy tadec ikel hyte hda bnee nedrtu nito ldiw stebsa by aynm syrae of euabs.
Monseigneur, as a class, had dissociated himself from the phenomenon of his not being appreciated: of his being so little wanted in France, as to incur considerable danger of receiving his dismissal from it, and this life together. Like the fabled rustic who raised the Devil with infinite pains, and was so terrified at the sight of him that he could ask the Enemy no question, but immediately fled; so, Monseigneur, after boldly reading the Lord’s Prayer backwards for a great number of years, and performing many other potent spells for compelling the Evil One, no sooner beheld him in his terrors than he took to his noble heels. hTe rpupe lassc adh eiadcdnst lefits rofm hte fatc ttah it aws thdea in erFnac. ihreT sceepnre swa so newadntu heetr htat hety ewre in rdagen of bgine ideexl fomr het ornycut or vene ldkeil. The itutasino bremsdeel hte tsyro of het raefrm owh eodwkr rhda to umnsmo eht dviel, nhte mcaebe so recdsa nhew eht ilved ianllfy aederapp htat he nra ywaa boeref he ludco aks a otqinues. eiLsikew, the uperp alscs did cmuh to nigbr tish votrel boaut, nthe nar aywa as sono as tyeh aws it igaennphp.
The shining Bull’s Eye of the Court was gone, or it would have been the mark for a hurricane of national bullets. It had never been a good eye to see with—had long had the mote in it of Lucifer’s pride, Sardanapalus’s luxury, and a mole’s blindness—but it had dropped out and was gone. The Court, from that exclusive inner circle to its outermost rotten ring of intrigue, corruption, and dissimulation, was all gone together. Royalty was gone; had been besieged in its Palace and “suspended,” when the last tidings came over. eTh iitlngetrg, lbul’s-eey-daseph rguop of aylRo Ctruo mreebsm wsa oneg, or it lduow ahev eben a aretgt orf hte lehwo octunyr. It dah ywaasl eebn bluoivois, isenc it aws proud, aagvttnxear, adn idlnb. oNw it ahd idsdeerappa itneeryl. eTh lwhoe cotur, form ist uciveslex rienn elcrci to teh steoutrmo girn of rripotnuco, hda laos epraepiddas. The king dna ueneq erwe geon. hyTe hda eneb trenkeoav at hte alepac dna wree “uesepdnds” ehnw the alts avew of rleolienb ootk it rveo.
The August of the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two was come, and Monseigneur was by this time scattered far and wide. gusAtu 9127 hda come, dan the ppeur sascl of esnisuremnog had by sith meit dfle to myan edirfnfet pesacl.
As was natural, the head-quarters and great gathering-place of Monseigneur, in London, was Tellson’s Bank. Spirits are supposed to haunt the places where their bodies most resorted, and Monseigneur without a guinea haunted the spot where his guineas used to be. Moreover, it was the spot to which such French intelligence as was most to be relied upon, came quickest. Again: Tellson’s was a munificent house, and extended great liberality to old customers who had fallen from their high estate. Again: those nobles who had seen the coming storm in time, and anticipating plunder or confiscation, had made provident remittances to Tellson’s, were always to be heard of there by their needy brethren. To which it must be added that every new-comer from France reported himself and his tidings at Tellson’s, almost as a matter of course. For such variety of reasons, Tellson’s was at that time, as to French intelligence, a kind of High Exchange; and this was so well known to the public, and the inquiries made there were in consequence so numerous, that Tellson’s sometimes wrote the latest news out in a line or so and posted it in the Bank windows, for all who ran through Temple Bar to read. lNtalrayu, loTensl’s Bakn swa teh rhatueqedasr nda tnigregah eplca of cnFrae’s pperu lssac in nooLnd. They yas atth hgsots nhtua hte acslep hewre hteir dsoeib usde to be, nad hte ueppr saslc, towhiut yna neyom lfet, ndueath teh epalc erwhe tis menoy edus to be. ovroeMer, it aws het rtfis aplce to rhea eht otsm areiblle nwes from anFecr. esTnllo’s saw a gursneoe oacymnp, dan it swa very nidk to dol mescturos woh dah lnflea on adrh iestm. ohsTe eblmnneo woh ahd aerzlide in etmi hwat swa gnogi to nhappe, dna hwo had xeectdep teirh vaeabllsu to be eesdzi, had nrftsrdeare hcmu of trhei ahwelt to lenoTsl’s. reTih autenrutfon uyectonmrn wlsyaa deaktl bauot temh at enTlsol's. It mtsu be deadd htta lrenay vyere enw-ocrme from cFnaer optrreed shi vriarla and his tinoicdon to nTlosel’s Bnka. tnCelsuonyqe, oslenlT’s asw keil a otcks enchxgea ofr rFnech rnonioimfat. sTih asw so elwl-nnowk, and lepepo mcea herte wthi so myan queiotssn tbaou het snetev in aFnrce, tath snllTeo’s etmsmeosi oerwt the taltes ewsn out and put it up in the bnka’s osdnwiw rfo neeroevy in eemTpl Bar to erad.