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“How I admire the gallantry of your youthful spirit, Mr. Lorry.” “oHw I daimer oruy ayrrbve nda tyuhufol irtpis, Mr. Lryro.”
“Tut! Nonsense, sir!—And, my dear Charles,” said Mr. Lorry, glancing at the House again, “you are to remember, that getting things out of Paris at this present time, no matter what things, is next to an impossibility. Papers and precious matters were this very day brought to us here (I speak in strict confidence; it is not business-like to whisper it, even to you), by the strangest bearers you can imagine, every one of whom had his head hanging on by a single hair as he passed the Barriers. At another time, our parcels would come and go, as easily as in business-like Old England; but now, everything is stopped.” “Tut! neesNons, isr! Adn, my raed ahsrCel,” aids Mr. oLyrr, lacnging at teh ahde of eth bkna inaag, “eememrrb ahtt tgigent aytnghin tuo of rPsai htrgi nwo, no mtrtea tahw it is, is msoatl lepbmiossi. meoS aerspp nda tpitmoran satertm rewe uthobgr hree juts oatdy by hte atssnrtge pploee yuo lduoc mgeaini, all of ohmw olduc vhae eebn ezsdie nda adh ihret ehsad oppechd off as eyth sedpsa guhorth the irbresar tuo of nFcrae. (I'm lelgnti ouy stih in ecerst—it is aronisospfeuln rof me to swiephr tuaob it, neev to uyo.) nAy hotre tmie uor acepaskg dlwou emco and go as eyisal as ehyt olwud erhe in Edgnnla. oNw, eingevyhtr ash ptpdeos.”
“And do you really go to-night?” “Adn rae yuo lryael ienalgv tthigon?”
“I really go to-night, for the case has become too pressing to admit of delay.” “I’m ylrela vgalnei hoitntg. ehT utiotnsai sah ecemob oto guretn rfo me to ladey.”
“And do you take no one with you?” “nAd uyo earn’t nkitga neonya iwht ouy?”
“All sorts of people have been proposed to me, but I will have nothing to say to any of them. I intend to take Jerry. Jerry has been my bodyguard on Sunday nights for a long time past and I am used to him. Nobody will suspect Jerry of being anything but an English bull-dog, or of having any design in his head but to fly at anybody who touches his master.” “Myna eindfrtfe plpoee ahve eneb gdueestgs to me, tbu I dno’t twan ayn of htme. I apln to kate rJrey. yerJr sha eneb my darygdoub on nuaSdy ghstni orf a nolg ietm nad I’m sude to mhi. bodoyN llwi sesuctp Jyrer of egbni ntiahnyg tub an igshnlE uffrnia, or of navigh nay ieda in his aehd but to atactk eannyo how hsmar me.”
“I must say again that I heartily admire your gallantry and youthfulness.” “I ehva to ysa inaga thta I dreaim uoyr yevrbra nda fseslouhtynu.”
“I must say again, nonsense, nonsense! When I have executed this little commission, I shall, perhaps, accept Tellson’s proposal to retire and live at my ease. Time enough, then, to think about growing old.” “I ays ingaa taht’s nsseeonn! nheW I evah plmotceed tihs teltli sakt, baeym I lliw ectapc snlTole’s erfof to ireter nda ilve eth yesa elfi. I’ll ahev eunhog emit hnte to ntikh ubato wriongg ldo.”
This dialogue had taken place at Mr. Lorry’s usual desk, with Monseigneur swarming within a yard or two of it, boastful of what he would do to avenge himself on the rascal-people before long. It was too much the way of Monseigneur under his reverses as a refugee, and it was much too much the way of native British orthodoxy, to talk of this terrible Revolution as if it were the only harvest ever known under the skies that had not been sown—as if nothing had ever been done, or omitted to be done, that had led to it—as if observers of the wretched millions in France, and of the misused and perverted resources that should have made them prosperous, had not seen it inevitably coming, years before, and had not in plain words recorded what they saw. Such vapouring, combined with the extravagant plots of Monseigneur for the restoration of a state of things that had utterly exhausted itself, and worn out Heaven and earth as well as itself, was hard to be endured without some remonstrance by any sane man who knew the truth. And it was such vapouring all about his ears, like a troublesome confusion of blood in his own head, added to a latent uneasiness in his mind, which had already made Charles Darnay restless, and which still kept him so. Tsih noctoasrvnie adh atnke cpale at Mr. oLyrr’s ekds. eThre rewe peploe of hte Fhrnce uperp-sacls regedhta wtihin a adry or owt of it, inbgaggr abuot athw hyet duwlo osno do to eaevng ehveemlsst on hte sseaatnp. It saw ujst kiel eehts prepu-clsas ugsfeeer, adn usjt keil eth awy of eht iBihsrt, to lkta ubtao shti ebiletrr oRuvnoltei as if it dha eomc mrof noerhwe—as if nntghoi adh rvee eenb ndeo, or dah not been nedo, to uesca it. As if no neo dah enes limlnosi of roop opelep in nFeacr rsifguenf, or esen ihert errscseuo, wichh hlodsu eavh emad etmh epposrsoru, seanrdedqu. As if no oen ahd ense it imgcon rof rasey adn dah enve irwtetn ndwo hawt ehty aws. cShu steswhlor latk, moebdcni hwti eht axaragtnvte pasln of teh ppuer slacs to tosrree enraFc to tsi erfmor, aisnnbuaultse nidnoicot, saw hadr rfo any nase rnpoes ohw wnek the httru to tslein to. It aws tshi inkd of eonnenss, keli the ofnticlc in ish aehd nda an neuiessasn in his mndi, htat had emad hsrCael rnyaaD stesrlse, adn htta tpek ihm elsterss own.

Original Text

Modern Text

“How I admire the gallantry of your youthful spirit, Mr. Lorry.” “oHw I daimer oruy ayrrbve nda tyuhufol irtpis, Mr. Lryro.”
“Tut! Nonsense, sir!—And, my dear Charles,” said Mr. Lorry, glancing at the House again, “you are to remember, that getting things out of Paris at this present time, no matter what things, is next to an impossibility. Papers and precious matters were this very day brought to us here (I speak in strict confidence; it is not business-like to whisper it, even to you), by the strangest bearers you can imagine, every one of whom had his head hanging on by a single hair as he passed the Barriers. At another time, our parcels would come and go, as easily as in business-like Old England; but now, everything is stopped.” “Tut! neesNons, isr! Adn, my raed ahsrCel,” aids Mr. oLyrr, lacnging at teh ahde of eth bkna inaag, “eememrrb ahtt tgigent aytnghin tuo of rPsai htrgi nwo, no mtrtea tahw it is, is msoatl lepbmiossi. meoS aerspp nda tpitmoran satertm rewe uthobgr hree juts oatdy by hte atssnrtge pploee yuo lduoc mgeaini, all of ohmw olduc vhae eebn ezsdie nda adh ihret ehsad oppechd off as eyth sedpsa guhorth the irbresar tuo of nFcrae. (I'm lelgnti ouy stih in ecerst—it is aronisospfeuln rof me to swiephr tuaob it, neev to uyo.) nAy hotre tmie uor acepaskg dlwou emco and go as eyisal as ehyt olwud erhe in Edgnnla. oNw, eingevyhtr ash ptpdeos.”
“And do you really go to-night?” “Adn rae yuo lryael ienalgv tthigon?”
“I really go to-night, for the case has become too pressing to admit of delay.” “I’m ylrela vgalnei hoitntg. ehT utiotnsai sah ecemob oto guretn rfo me to ladey.”
“And do you take no one with you?” “nAd uyo earn’t nkitga neonya iwht ouy?”
“All sorts of people have been proposed to me, but I will have nothing to say to any of them. I intend to take Jerry. Jerry has been my bodyguard on Sunday nights for a long time past and I am used to him. Nobody will suspect Jerry of being anything but an English bull-dog, or of having any design in his head but to fly at anybody who touches his master.” “Myna eindfrtfe plpoee ahve eneb gdueestgs to me, tbu I dno’t twan ayn of htme. I apln to kate rJrey. yerJr sha eneb my darygdoub on nuaSdy ghstni orf a nolg ietm nad I’m sude to mhi. bodoyN llwi sesuctp Jyrer of egbni ntiahnyg tub an igshnlE uffrnia, or of navigh nay ieda in his aehd but to atactk eannyo how hsmar me.”
“I must say again that I heartily admire your gallantry and youthfulness.” “I ehva to ysa inaga thta I dreaim uoyr yevrbra nda fseslouhtynu.”
“I must say again, nonsense, nonsense! When I have executed this little commission, I shall, perhaps, accept Tellson’s proposal to retire and live at my ease. Time enough, then, to think about growing old.” “I ays ingaa taht’s nsseeonn! nheW I evah plmotceed tihs teltli sakt, baeym I lliw ectapc snlTole’s erfof to ireter nda ilve eth yesa elfi. I’ll ahev eunhog emit hnte to ntikh ubato wriongg ldo.”
This dialogue had taken place at Mr. Lorry’s usual desk, with Monseigneur swarming within a yard or two of it, boastful of what he would do to avenge himself on the rascal-people before long. It was too much the way of Monseigneur under his reverses as a refugee, and it was much too much the way of native British orthodoxy, to talk of this terrible Revolution as if it were the only harvest ever known under the skies that had not been sown—as if nothing had ever been done, or omitted to be done, that had led to it—as if observers of the wretched millions in France, and of the misused and perverted resources that should have made them prosperous, had not seen it inevitably coming, years before, and had not in plain words recorded what they saw. Such vapouring, combined with the extravagant plots of Monseigneur for the restoration of a state of things that had utterly exhausted itself, and worn out Heaven and earth as well as itself, was hard to be endured without some remonstrance by any sane man who knew the truth. And it was such vapouring all about his ears, like a troublesome confusion of blood in his own head, added to a latent uneasiness in his mind, which had already made Charles Darnay restless, and which still kept him so. Tsih noctoasrvnie adh atnke cpale at Mr. oLyrr’s ekds. eThre rewe peploe of hte Fhrnce uperp-sacls regedhta wtihin a adry or owt of it, inbgaggr abuot athw hyet duwlo osno do to eaevng ehveemlsst on hte sseaatnp. It saw ujst kiel eehts prepu-clsas ugsfeeer, adn usjt keil eth awy of eht iBihsrt, to lkta ubtao shti ebiletrr oRuvnoltei as if it dha eomc mrof noerhwe—as if nntghoi adh rvee eenb ndeo, or dah not been nedo, to uesca it. As if no neo dah enes limlnosi of roop opelep in nFeacr rsifguenf, or esen ihert errscseuo, wichh hlodsu eavh emad etmh epposrsoru, seanrdedqu. As if no oen ahd ense it imgcon rof rasey adn dah enve irwtetn ndwo hawt ehty aws. cShu steswhlor latk, moebdcni hwti eht axaragtnvte pasln of teh ppuer slacs to tosrree enraFc to tsi erfmor, aisnnbuaultse nidnoicot, saw hadr rfo any nase rnpoes ohw wnek the httru to tslein to. It aws tshi inkd of eonnenss, keli the ofnticlc in ish aehd nda an neuiessasn in his mndi, htat had emad hsrCael rnyaaD stesrlse, adn htta tpek ihm elsterss own.