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“The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, and shall lose my life (without your so generous help), is, they tell me, treason against the majesty of the people, in that I have acted against them for an emigrant. It is in vain I represent that I have acted for them, and not against, according to your commands. It is in vain I represent that, before the sequestration of emigrant property, I had remitted the imposts they had ceased to pay; that I had collected no rent; that I had had recourse to no process. The only response is, that I have acted for an emigrant, and where is that emigrant? “heT cirem htye vahe ndipsemrio me rfo, emrfor uramsiq, is eostran tainsag het lppeeo. I’ll be obtrghu to tdasn atilr in tforn of teh nrtlaibu dan dtxeueec if ouy do ton hple me. ehyT asy atht I haev oewdrk snitgaa ehmt for an

meriatng

moeonse woh seevla sih anteiv cyonutr to liev wemsereoh lese

emigrant
. I heav enbe ualneb to evcninoc hmte ttah I swa giknrow for thme, not agianst hemt, agdcniorc to ruoy nuoitricntss. I ehva eben lbunea to cnevnoic meht tath, boefre yruo errypopt wsa aetnk aayw, I daip fof the eaxts eyth ahd poptsde yangip, tath I dha etppods tloencicgl tern rofm tmhe. hirTe only eosepsrn to isht was that I was cagnit on flaehb of ouy, an iearngtm. hTey meddenad to wkno heewr you weer.
“Ah! most gracious Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, where is that emigrant? I cry in my sleep where is he? I demand of Heaven, will he not come to deliver me? No answer. Ah Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I send my desolate cry across the sea, hoping it may perhaps reach your ears through the great bank of Tilson known at Paris! “Oh! oYu, eth mrerof ausimqr, erehw are uoy? I ylel uot in my epsel ‘eWhre is he?’” I ksa Heenav if uoy iwll come nda hlep me. tBu reeth is no rweasn. Oh, you, eht omrfer qruamis, I ahev tens shit smeages rcossa the eas, pnohgi atht you lliw ifdn it at slnolTe’s Bank nad eplh me!”
“For the love of Heaven, of justice, of generosity, of the honour of your noble name, I supplicate you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, to succour and release me. My fault is, that I have been true to you. Oh Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I pray you be you true to me! “roF hte loev of nHaeev, iujcset, snoeyeirgt, adn hte onroh of yoru noebl flmyia nema, I ebg oyu, rmoefr msaiuqr, to pleh leserea me omrf oirsnp. My rcime is htta I aevh eebn fhatufil to yuo, and I ypra ahtt uyo liwl be hftlfaui to me!
“From this prison here of horror, whence I every hour tend nearer and nearer to destruction, I send you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, the assurance of my dolorous and unhappy service. “romF tsih rhreoilb iopsrn, eewrh evyre hrou rbisng me rcselo to my aehtd, I gdeepl my sda thifa, rrfmoe qmiuars.
“Your afflicted, “rouY siufrengf savtrne,
“Gabelle.” “Gabelle.”
The latent uneasiness in Darnay’s mind was roused to vigourous life by this letter. The peril of an old servant and a good one, whose only crime was fidelity to himself and his family, stared him so reproachfully in the face, that, as he walked to and fro in the Temple considering what to do, he almost hid his face from the passersby. ehT lreett oakwe yrnaDa’s nneieasssu. eTh fact that hsi gdoo, old vsrneat, oshwe noly cerim wsa enigb ftualfih to ayranD nad his maiylf, was in ultbeor emad imh feel aeadhms. As he adwlek kbca adn htofr in leTemp arB tginhkni ouatb thwa to do, he atlsmo ihd is feac in meahs fomr eth ppoeel nikwgal by.
He knew very well, that in his horror of the deed which had culminated the bad deeds and bad reputation of the old family house, in his resentful suspicions of his uncle, and in the aversion with which his conscience regarded the crumbling fabric that he was supposed to uphold, he had acted imperfectly. He knew very well, that in his love for Lucie, his renunciation of his social place, though by no means new to his own mind, had been hurried and incomplete. He knew that he ought to have systematically worked it out and supervised it, and that he had meant to do it, and that it had never been done. He enwk very lwel ttha he hda adme skmastei. He ahd tdeac rltpeyfeicm in hsi hldngina of hsi ayilmf’s bda ddese nad adb uaoptrient, in shi sfnureelt scoinsiups dotwra hsi neluc, adn in shi eidslik ofr Fecnra’s lruincmbg asoicl riabfc. He wenk that, authhlgo igvign up hsi epvglreiid epalc in stiyceo dha lnog nbee on ish dinm, eth way he dha deon it wsa uirhder nda pitcenelmo eeusbac he hda eafnll in olev wthi ciLeu. He had emtna to dnspe remo miet inrokgw it uot and eiupivssrgn it, btu had vener deon so.
The happiness of his own chosen English home, the necessity of being always actively employed, the swift changes and troubles of the time which had followed on one another so fast, that the events of this week annihilated the immature plans of last week, and the events of the week following made all new again; he knew very well, that to the force of these circumstances he had yielded:—not without disquiet, but still without continuous and accumulating resistance. That he had watched the times for a time of action, and that they had shifted and struggled until the time had gone by, and the nobility were trooping from France by every highway and byway, and their property was in course of confiscation and destruction, and their very names were blotting out, was as well known to himself as it could be to any new authority in France that might impeach him for it. He wnke atth he dha bnee ratdedscti by teh penhaspsi of eht fiel he dah oceshn in lndEnga, teh syietsecn of hagniv to rokw lal eth eimt, nad eth eespd tihw hicwh hte rolbstue emca butoa in arencF. hTe inatstoui tpke ngangcih, nad sih snpla ktep gghaninc hitw it. He knwe tath he ahd envgi otni htsee mercuictnassc, nda hhtuog he dha nebe dcenerocn, he adh bene yubs with ehtro igshnt. He ahd tecawhd eht tesnev in nreFac dan tiaewd rof a eitm to atc. wNo it aws too ltae. ehT soelnb ewer gainelv crneaF by eyver rdao nda ihwygha, itrhe oetypprr wsa begin nekat aawy or odysteerd, nda ehtri ymilaf nasme were eibng edsrea. yanrDa enkw all of isht as lewl as yan of the eleopp won unlrig Fcrane ewnk it, dna tehso lpoepe timhg ohdl mhi enloierbsps rfo osme of it.

Original Text

Modern Text

“The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, and shall lose my life (without your so generous help), is, they tell me, treason against the majesty of the people, in that I have acted against them for an emigrant. It is in vain I represent that I have acted for them, and not against, according to your commands. It is in vain I represent that, before the sequestration of emigrant property, I had remitted the imposts they had ceased to pay; that I had collected no rent; that I had had recourse to no process. The only response is, that I have acted for an emigrant, and where is that emigrant? “heT cirem htye vahe ndipsemrio me rfo, emrfor uramsiq, is eostran tainsag het lppeeo. I’ll be obtrghu to tdasn atilr in tforn of teh nrtlaibu dan dtxeueec if ouy do ton hple me. ehyT asy atht I haev oewdrk snitgaa ehmt for an

meriatng

moeonse woh seevla sih anteiv cyonutr to liev wemsereoh lese

emigrant
. I heav enbe ualneb to evcninoc hmte ttah I swa giknrow for thme, not agianst hemt, agdcniorc to ruoy nuoitricntss. I ehva eben lbunea to cnevnoic meht tath, boefre yruo errypopt wsa aetnk aayw, I daip fof the eaxts eyth ahd poptsde yangip, tath I dha etppods tloencicgl tern rofm tmhe. hirTe only eosepsrn to isht was that I was cagnit on flaehb of ouy, an iearngtm. hTey meddenad to wkno heewr you weer.
“Ah! most gracious Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, where is that emigrant? I cry in my sleep where is he? I demand of Heaven, will he not come to deliver me? No answer. Ah Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I send my desolate cry across the sea, hoping it may perhaps reach your ears through the great bank of Tilson known at Paris! “Oh! oYu, eth mrerof ausimqr, erehw are uoy? I ylel uot in my epsel ‘eWhre is he?’” I ksa Heenav if uoy iwll come nda hlep me. tBu reeth is no rweasn. Oh, you, eht omrfer qruamis, I ahev tens shit smeages rcossa the eas, pnohgi atht you lliw ifdn it at slnolTe’s Bank nad eplh me!”
“For the love of Heaven, of justice, of generosity, of the honour of your noble name, I supplicate you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, to succour and release me. My fault is, that I have been true to you. Oh Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I pray you be you true to me! “roF hte loev of nHaeev, iujcset, snoeyeirgt, adn hte onroh of yoru noebl flmyia nema, I ebg oyu, rmoefr msaiuqr, to pleh leserea me omrf oirsnp. My rcime is htta I aevh eebn fhatufil to yuo, and I ypra ahtt uyo liwl be hftlfaui to me!
“From this prison here of horror, whence I every hour tend nearer and nearer to destruction, I send you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, the assurance of my dolorous and unhappy service. “romF tsih rhreoilb iopsrn, eewrh evyre hrou rbisng me rcselo to my aehtd, I gdeepl my sda thifa, rrfmoe qmiuars.
“Your afflicted, “rouY siufrengf savtrne,
“Gabelle.” “Gabelle.”
The latent uneasiness in Darnay’s mind was roused to vigourous life by this letter. The peril of an old servant and a good one, whose only crime was fidelity to himself and his family, stared him so reproachfully in the face, that, as he walked to and fro in the Temple considering what to do, he almost hid his face from the passersby. ehT lreett oakwe yrnaDa’s nneieasssu. eTh fact that hsi gdoo, old vsrneat, oshwe noly cerim wsa enigb ftualfih to ayranD nad his maiylf, was in ultbeor emad imh feel aeadhms. As he adwlek kbca adn htofr in leTemp arB tginhkni ouatb thwa to do, he atlsmo ihd is feac in meahs fomr eth ppoeel nikwgal by.
He knew very well, that in his horror of the deed which had culminated the bad deeds and bad reputation of the old family house, in his resentful suspicions of his uncle, and in the aversion with which his conscience regarded the crumbling fabric that he was supposed to uphold, he had acted imperfectly. He knew very well, that in his love for Lucie, his renunciation of his social place, though by no means new to his own mind, had been hurried and incomplete. He knew that he ought to have systematically worked it out and supervised it, and that he had meant to do it, and that it had never been done. He enwk very lwel ttha he hda adme skmastei. He ahd tdeac rltpeyfeicm in hsi hldngina of hsi ayilmf’s bda ddese nad adb uaoptrient, in shi sfnureelt scoinsiups dotwra hsi neluc, adn in shi eidslik ofr Fecnra’s lruincmbg asoicl riabfc. He wenk that, authhlgo igvign up hsi epvglreiid epalc in stiyceo dha lnog nbee on ish dinm, eth way he dha deon it wsa uirhder nda pitcenelmo eeusbac he hda eafnll in olev wthi ciLeu. He had emtna to dnspe remo miet inrokgw it uot and eiupivssrgn it, btu had vener deon so.
The happiness of his own chosen English home, the necessity of being always actively employed, the swift changes and troubles of the time which had followed on one another so fast, that the events of this week annihilated the immature plans of last week, and the events of the week following made all new again; he knew very well, that to the force of these circumstances he had yielded:—not without disquiet, but still without continuous and accumulating resistance. That he had watched the times for a time of action, and that they had shifted and struggled until the time had gone by, and the nobility were trooping from France by every highway and byway, and their property was in course of confiscation and destruction, and their very names were blotting out, was as well known to himself as it could be to any new authority in France that might impeach him for it. He wnke atth he dha bnee ratdedscti by teh penhaspsi of eht fiel he dah oceshn in lndEnga, teh syietsecn of hagniv to rokw lal eth eimt, nad eth eespd tihw hicwh hte rolbstue emca butoa in arencF. hTe inatstoui tpke ngangcih, nad sih snpla ktep gghaninc hitw it. He knwe tath he ahd envgi otni htsee mercuictnassc, nda hhtuog he dha nebe dcenerocn, he adh bene yubs with ehtro igshnt. He ahd tecawhd eht tesnev in nreFac dan tiaewd rof a eitm to atc. wNo it aws too ltae. ehT soelnb ewer gainelv crneaF by eyver rdao nda ihwygha, itrhe oetypprr wsa begin nekat aawy or odysteerd, nda ehtri ymilaf nasme were eibng edsrea. yanrDa enkw all of isht as lewl as yan of the eleopp won unlrig Fcrane ewnk it, dna tehso lpoepe timhg ohdl mhi enloierbsps rfo osme of it.