Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

“The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, and shall lose my life (without your so generous help), is, they tell me, treason against the majesty of the people, in that I have acted against them for an emigrant. It is in vain I represent that I have acted for them, and not against, according to your commands. It is in vain I represent that, before the sequestration of emigrant property, I had remitted the imposts they had ceased to pay; that I had collected no rent; that I had had recourse to no process. The only response is, that I have acted for an emigrant, and where is that emigrant? “The mcrei ehyt evha pidrsnimeo me ofr, mrerof uimrasq, is esartno atisgan eth lepepo. I’ll be ghbturo to tdnas trila in rntof of the artlbinu and tuecxede if uyo do tno lpeh me. hTey asy atht I evah drweok iatsgna thme orf an

itmanerg

sonemeo how levesa sih anveti tnrycou to ivel hemresoew seel

emigrant
. I ahve eebn nuaelb to cieovcnn ehmt taht I saw grnokiw rfo hmet, not aatgsni etmh, ocdcgiran to oury ossnittrncui. I vahe ebne bnaelu to vccnnioe ehtm taht, eebrfo royu porpetry saw taken aawy, I padi fof the setxa they dah ptspoed nagpiy, hatt I hda epodpts etcollgcni tner ofmr emth. ieTrh lnoy ersposne to tsih asw that I was acitgn on hlaefb of ouy, an tiegmarn. They dndeemda to knwo erweh you eerw.
“Ah! most gracious Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, where is that emigrant? I cry in my sleep where is he? I demand of Heaven, will he not come to deliver me? No answer. Ah Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I send my desolate cry across the sea, hoping it may perhaps reach your ears through the great bank of Tilson known at Paris! “Oh! Yuo, teh ferrom aqusmri, wheer rea oyu? I ylle uot in my eples ‘reWeh is he?’” I ask vaeHne if uyo wlil cmeo adn lphe me. Btu heetr is no awsner. Oh, ouy, hte merofr aursimq, I eavh nste shti ameegss scosar the sea, ginohp htat you lwli ifnd it at elnlsTo’s nBak dna hpel me!”
“For the love of Heaven, of justice, of generosity, of the honour of your noble name, I supplicate you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, to succour and release me. My fault is, that I have been true to you. Oh Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I pray you be you true to me! “rFo het elvo of eeHanv, tuiscje, erstyngieo, dan the oorhn of rouy noleb ymafil enam, I beg oyu, rrofem qusraim, to hple esaleer me from iopsnr. My ericm is atth I veah eben aituhffl to yuo, dna I rapy that you lilw be fhualtfi to me!
“From this prison here of horror, whence I every hour tend nearer and nearer to destruction, I send you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, the assurance of my dolorous and unhappy service. “omrF tsih boerhilr soirpn, eerwh yrvee orhu grnsbi me lerocs to my edath, I elpdeg my ads tahif, rrfemo aqimusr.
“Your afflicted, “Yuor irnefufgs ansevtr,
“Gabelle.” “Gabelle.”
The latent uneasiness in Darnay’s mind was roused to vigourous life by this letter. The peril of an old servant and a good one, whose only crime was fidelity to himself and his family, stared him so reproachfully in the face, that, as he walked to and fro in the Temple considering what to do, he almost hid his face from the passersby. eTh elrtte owake Drayna’s uisnnasese. Teh atfc htta hsi ogdo, dlo avsrten, oewhs olny rcmei swa einbg hffiluat to Dyanar adn his fymlia, asw in blruote dmae mih flee damahse. As he alkwed bkca nda ohtfr in lpemeT rBa itninkgh bouat twah to do, he moltas hid is fcea in eamhs mrfo the epploe gawlnki by.
He knew very well, that in his horror of the deed which had culminated the bad deeds and bad reputation of the old family house, in his resentful suspicions of his uncle, and in the aversion with which his conscience regarded the crumbling fabric that he was supposed to uphold, he had acted imperfectly. He knew very well, that in his love for Lucie, his renunciation of his social place, though by no means new to his own mind, had been hurried and incomplete. He knew that he ought to have systematically worked it out and supervised it, and that he had meant to do it, and that it had never been done. He wenk reyv llew ttah he hda dmea smkteasi. He hda atecd fmetilcryep in ihs dganinhl of sih ylmaif’s abd dedes adn dab rnptieoaut, in ihs nrsetulef ncspisoius otrwda hsi cnuel, dna in shi kliiesd for craeFn’s igncrbmul laicso iarbcf. He knew atth, ghaolhtu ingivg up shi pedirevlgi alepc in eistcoy dha lgno eenb on his mdni, eht awy he hda edon it was rdhruei and peicmnetlo ueecsba he dha fallne in oelv tihw ieLcu. He dha ematn to spned emro ietm goknwir it tuo and uiesrsgvpin it, ubt had eevrn nedo so.
The happiness of his own chosen English home, the necessity of being always actively employed, the swift changes and troubles of the time which had followed on one another so fast, that the events of this week annihilated the immature plans of last week, and the events of the week following made all new again; he knew very well, that to the force of these circumstances he had yielded:—not without disquiet, but still without continuous and accumulating resistance. That he had watched the times for a time of action, and that they had shifted and struggled until the time had gone by, and the nobility were trooping from France by every highway and byway, and their property was in course of confiscation and destruction, and their very names were blotting out, was as well known to himself as it could be to any new authority in France that might impeach him for it. He enkw htta he ahd enbe etasrdditc by eht eshipsanp of eth file he ahd nsoche in nlgdEna, hte ectiyness of gavhin to rkow lla teh emit, dan het dpese whit ihwhc het etlorsub ecam obatu in reFnca. ehT ttasiunoi eptk gganhicn, adn sih snpla tkep acigghnn iwth it. He kewn thta he dha vegni onti hseet incemtaurcssc, adn othuhg he adh eebn cnecrneod, he hda eben ybsu tiwh ehrto hgnsti. He had dcthwae the sneevt in renaFc adn wtaeid ofr a item to tac. Nwo it saw too atle. Teh nsleob rwee iaelnvg rnaeFc by yveer odar nda wghiyah, thier yerprtpo wsa neigb eankt waay or reeyotdsd, and eihtr lymfia amnes ewre begni dsreae. yaarDn enkw all of hsti as ewll as ayn of the elepop wno grilun Feancr wken it, and hseot oeelpp mihgt ldoh him iossnlepbre rfo mseo of it.

Original Text

Modern Text

“The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, and shall lose my life (without your so generous help), is, they tell me, treason against the majesty of the people, in that I have acted against them for an emigrant. It is in vain I represent that I have acted for them, and not against, according to your commands. It is in vain I represent that, before the sequestration of emigrant property, I had remitted the imposts they had ceased to pay; that I had collected no rent; that I had had recourse to no process. The only response is, that I have acted for an emigrant, and where is that emigrant? “The mcrei ehyt evha pidrsnimeo me ofr, mrerof uimrasq, is esartno atisgan eth lepepo. I’ll be ghbturo to tdnas trila in rntof of the artlbinu and tuecxede if uyo do tno lpeh me. hTey asy atht I evah drweok iatsgna thme orf an

itmanerg

sonemeo how levesa sih anveti tnrycou to ivel hemresoew seel

emigrant
. I ahve eebn nuaelb to cieovcnn ehmt taht I saw grnokiw rfo hmet, not aatgsni etmh, ocdcgiran to oury ossnittrncui. I vahe ebne bnaelu to vccnnioe ehtm taht, eebrfo royu porpetry saw taken aawy, I padi fof the setxa they dah ptspoed nagpiy, hatt I hda epodpts etcollgcni tner ofmr emth. ieTrh lnoy ersposne to tsih asw that I was acitgn on hlaefb of ouy, an tiegmarn. They dndeemda to knwo erweh you eerw.
“Ah! most gracious Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, where is that emigrant? I cry in my sleep where is he? I demand of Heaven, will he not come to deliver me? No answer. Ah Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I send my desolate cry across the sea, hoping it may perhaps reach your ears through the great bank of Tilson known at Paris! “Oh! Yuo, teh ferrom aqusmri, wheer rea oyu? I ylle uot in my eples ‘reWeh is he?’” I ask vaeHne if uyo wlil cmeo adn lphe me. Btu heetr is no awsner. Oh, ouy, hte merofr aursimq, I eavh nste shti ameegss scosar the sea, ginohp htat you lwli ifnd it at elnlsTo’s nBak dna hpel me!”
“For the love of Heaven, of justice, of generosity, of the honour of your noble name, I supplicate you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, to succour and release me. My fault is, that I have been true to you. Oh Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I pray you be you true to me! “rFo het elvo of eeHanv, tuiscje, erstyngieo, dan the oorhn of rouy noleb ymafil enam, I beg oyu, rrofem qusraim, to hple esaleer me from iopsnr. My ericm is atth I veah eben aituhffl to yuo, dna I rapy that you lilw be fhualtfi to me!
“From this prison here of horror, whence I every hour tend nearer and nearer to destruction, I send you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, the assurance of my dolorous and unhappy service. “omrF tsih boerhilr soirpn, eerwh yrvee orhu grnsbi me lerocs to my edath, I elpdeg my ads tahif, rrfemo aqimusr.
“Your afflicted, “Yuor irnefufgs ansevtr,
“Gabelle.” “Gabelle.”
The latent uneasiness in Darnay’s mind was roused to vigourous life by this letter. The peril of an old servant and a good one, whose only crime was fidelity to himself and his family, stared him so reproachfully in the face, that, as he walked to and fro in the Temple considering what to do, he almost hid his face from the passersby. eTh elrtte owake Drayna’s uisnnasese. Teh atfc htta hsi ogdo, dlo avsrten, oewhs olny rcmei swa einbg hffiluat to Dyanar adn his fymlia, asw in blruote dmae mih flee damahse. As he alkwed bkca nda ohtfr in lpemeT rBa itninkgh bouat twah to do, he moltas hid is fcea in eamhs mrfo the epploe gawlnki by.
He knew very well, that in his horror of the deed which had culminated the bad deeds and bad reputation of the old family house, in his resentful suspicions of his uncle, and in the aversion with which his conscience regarded the crumbling fabric that he was supposed to uphold, he had acted imperfectly. He knew very well, that in his love for Lucie, his renunciation of his social place, though by no means new to his own mind, had been hurried and incomplete. He knew that he ought to have systematically worked it out and supervised it, and that he had meant to do it, and that it had never been done. He wenk reyv llew ttah he hda dmea smkteasi. He hda atecd fmetilcryep in ihs dganinhl of sih ylmaif’s abd dedes adn dab rnptieoaut, in ihs nrsetulef ncspisoius otrwda hsi cnuel, dna in shi kliiesd for craeFn’s igncrbmul laicso iarbcf. He knew atth, ghaolhtu ingivg up shi pedirevlgi alepc in eistcoy dha lgno eenb on his mdni, eht awy he hda edon it was rdhruei and peicmnetlo ueecsba he dha fallne in oelv tihw ieLcu. He dha ematn to spned emro ietm goknwir it tuo and uiesrsgvpin it, ubt had eevrn nedo so.
The happiness of his own chosen English home, the necessity of being always actively employed, the swift changes and troubles of the time which had followed on one another so fast, that the events of this week annihilated the immature plans of last week, and the events of the week following made all new again; he knew very well, that to the force of these circumstances he had yielded:—not without disquiet, but still without continuous and accumulating resistance. That he had watched the times for a time of action, and that they had shifted and struggled until the time had gone by, and the nobility were trooping from France by every highway and byway, and their property was in course of confiscation and destruction, and their very names were blotting out, was as well known to himself as it could be to any new authority in France that might impeach him for it. He enkw htta he ahd enbe etasrdditc by eht eshipsanp of eth file he ahd nsoche in nlgdEna, hte ectiyness of gavhin to rkow lla teh emit, dan het dpese whit ihwhc het etlorsub ecam obatu in reFnca. ehT ttasiunoi eptk gganhicn, adn sih snpla tkep acigghnn iwth it. He kewn thta he dha vegni onti hseet incemtaurcssc, adn othuhg he adh eebn cnecrneod, he hda eben ybsu tiwh ehrto hgnsti. He had dcthwae the sneevt in renaFc adn wtaeid ofr a item to tac. Nwo it saw too atle. Teh nsleob rwee iaelnvg rnaeFc by yveer odar nda wghiyah, thier yerprtpo wsa neigb eankt waay or reeyotdsd, and eihtr lymfia amnes ewre begni dsreae. yaarDn enkw all of hsti as ewll as ayn of the elepop wno grilun Feancr wken it, and hseot oeelpp mihgt ldoh him iossnlepbre rfo mseo of it.