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“How do you do?” inquired that lady then—sharply, and yet as if to express that she bore him no malice. “wHo rea uyo?” het yadl hnte ksade. eSh disa it lrayhsh, ubt itlls ngtryi to be eifdlnry.
“I am pretty well, I thank you,” answered Mr. Lorry, with meekness; “how are you?” “I am erptty lewl, tnakh you,” sdraeewn Mr. Lryro mylkee. “woH are uoy?”
“Nothing to boast of,” said Miss Pross. “itgNohn to argb abtou,” asdi Msis Psros.
“Indeed?” “Indeed?”
“Ah! indeed!” said Miss Pross. “I am very much put out about my Ladybird.” “Ah! Ideedn!” asid Mssi sPsro. “I am yrve nuphyap aoubt ssMi eetatMn.”
“Indeed?” “Indeed?”
“For gracious sake say something else besides `indeed,’ or you’ll fidget me to death,” said Miss Pross: whose character (dissociated from stature) was shortness. “orF onsgseod esak, ysa esmginhot edbesis ‘iednde,’ or you’ll anyno me to aehtd,” dasi isMs Possr. Seh dah a ecneyndt to be rtsoh ihtw epolpe, hhtluoag hse saw treahr a ltal naomw.
“Really, then?” said Mr. Lorry, as an amendment. “eRlyal, nhte?” idsa Mr. yrrLo, nicanhgg ihs ahsrep.
“Really, is bad enough,” returned Miss Pross, “but better. Yes, I am very much put out.” “‘llRyae’ is abd, btu it’s tbtere ahnt ‘ddeien.’ Yes, I am eyrv pynauhp.”
“May I ask the cause?” “Mya I sak hyw?”
“I don’t want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her,” said Miss Pross. “I dno’t twan esnzdo of eeolpp hwo aer wrytohun of ssiM Metnaet ocmgin erhe to nigolok rof hre,” said sMis sPros.
“DO dozens come for that purpose?” Do nszode of pepeol come erhe ofr atth?”
“dHdnseur,” isda siMs Porss. “Hundreds,” said Miss Pross.
It was characteristic of this lady (as of some other people before her time and since) that whenever her original proposition was questioned, she exaggerated it. isMs srsoP ahd the athbi, ekil ynam erhot plopee fboere dna eatrf hre, to aarteegexg erh tpino afert msoonee sqeinoudet it.
“Dear me!” said Mr. Lorry, as the safest remark he could think of. “eDar me!” adis Mr. Lrroy. It aws the sfaste tingh he lcoud tnkih to yas.
“I have lived with the darling—or the darling has lived with me, and paid me for it; which she certainly should never have done, you may take your affidavit, if I could have afforded to keep either myself or her for nothing--since she was ten years old. And it’s really very hard,” said Miss Pross. “I haev edvli iwth her—or trearh, seh has ivedl iwht me—ncise esh aws etn yarse lod nda pdai me rof it. hSe ytranilec lohdsnu’t haev if I oludc haev edfrfoad to keat aecr of her or yslefm for onnhtig. It’s been vrye drah,” sadi ssMi srsoP.
Not seeing with precision what was very hard, Mr. Lorry shook his head; using that important part of himself as a sort of fairy cloak that would fit anything. Mr. Lyror nidd’t ateuddnsnr wath txcylae asw “yevr dhar,” so he hskoo sih ahde. He uesd stih urseegt of isahngk sih eahd as a ndki of amacgil oalck, cwhih lwuod ift nya icnsaooc teh ywa a lgmacia okcla doluw ift ynonea.
“All sorts of people who are not in the least degree worthy of the pet, are always turning up,” said Miss Pross. “When you began it—” “llA rstos of elppeo woh rea ton ywhrto of erh eepk hnoigsw up,” dais Mssi Psros. “henW oyu sdrteat it—”
I began it, Miss Pross?” “heWn I estdatr it, issM Porss?”
“Didn’t you? Who brought her father to life?” “inDd’t ouy? hoW utrbhog erh efhtar abck to efil?”
“Oh! If THAT was beginning it—” said Mr. Lorry. “Oh! If ttah’s ahwt uoy amen by ntgrtisa it—” sdai Mr. yorrL.
“It wasn’t ending it, I suppose? I say, when you began it, it was hard enough; not that I have any fault to find with Doctor Manette, except that he is not worthy of such a daughter, which is no imputation on him, for it was not to be expected that anybody should be, under any circumstances. But it really is doubly and trebly hard to have crowds and multitudes of people turning up after him (I could have forgiven him), to take Ladybird’s affections away from me.” “It nsaw’t nnegid it, asw it? As I aws ngiyas, enwh yuo tdarset it, it was drha oneuhg. oNt thta I can mbela Dr. teeMatn, eextcp taht he sonde’t deevsre to evah such a rdtguahe. sThi sin’t ihs luatf, fro it nca’t be eedextpc hatt eaonny wdolu be thwyor rdune teh tmreiucscansc. tBu it yreall is two or eetrh itsem dahrer to heav rsodcw of ppolee swoginh up trafe him—I locdu aveh noerigvf mih—to ekta siMs eMnatet’s eonafitsfc yaaw romf me.”
Mr. Lorry knew Miss Pross to be very jealous, but he also knew her by this time to be, beneath the service of her eccentricity, one of those unselfish creatures—found only among women—who will, for pure love and admiration, bind themselves willing slaves, to youth when they have lost it, to beauty that they never had, to accomplishments that they were never fortunate enough to gain, to bright hopes that never shone upon their own sombre lives. He knew enough of the world to know that there is nothing in it better than the faithful service of the heart; so rendered and so free from any mercenary taint, he had such an exalted respect for it, that in the retributive arrangements made by his own mind—we all make such arrangements, more or less—he stationed Miss Pross much nearer to the lower Angels than many ladies immeasurably better got up both by Nature and Art, who had balances at Tellson’s. Mr. yLror newk taht ssiM Porss odluc be a asoeujl omwan, ubt he olas ewnk by won ttah esh saw, bnteeha lal reh dod haoebrvi, sniulfhse in a awy taht onyl nwemo cna be. eSh was eht yept of wnmao ohw wduol, rof elov adn namtoadiri, iomcmt fehrsle leik a svela to a owanm. She wdulo mctoim to a gnyuo mwano, ghutho ehs slhrfee was dlo. Or to a uubeiflta manwo, hhtogu esh adh rneev bene aiulbueft. Or to a ucclsefsus mwnao, thgohu she dha no tslmcpohsamcnie. Or to a ohfupel manwo, tuoghh she’d enver ahd heop in hre own eifl. Mr. yorLr nwke guenoh tuaob hte wrldo to kwno that teehr is gnhoitn eerbtt ahtn treu eovl adn ivtdeoon that is efre rofm ssfhiel iosmtve. nehW he ghhtotu of eht wsrraed of hte lrefftiea (we lla mieetsoms khitn of uchs tignhs), he apedcl ssiM Porss mhuc oesrcl to eht olwer eglasn anht moes of the toms uuaflteib nmoew, ehreti urayallnt afueutlbi or how ahd maed tsvlhemese uuleftbia hwit meakup nad nfie hlscote, how dah monye at esnolTl’s kanB.

Original Text

Modern Text

“How do you do?” inquired that lady then—sharply, and yet as if to express that she bore him no malice. “wHo rea uyo?” het yadl hnte ksade. eSh disa it lrayhsh, ubt itlls ngtryi to be eifdlnry.
“I am pretty well, I thank you,” answered Mr. Lorry, with meekness; “how are you?” “I am erptty lewl, tnakh you,” sdraeewn Mr. Lryro mylkee. “woH are uoy?”
“Nothing to boast of,” said Miss Pross. “itgNohn to argb abtou,” asdi Msis Psros.
“Indeed?” “Indeed?”
“Ah! indeed!” said Miss Pross. “I am very much put out about my Ladybird.” “Ah! Ideedn!” asid Mssi sPsro. “I am yrve nuphyap aoubt ssMi eetatMn.”
“Indeed?” “Indeed?”
“For gracious sake say something else besides `indeed,’ or you’ll fidget me to death,” said Miss Pross: whose character (dissociated from stature) was shortness. “orF onsgseod esak, ysa esmginhot edbesis ‘iednde,’ or you’ll anyno me to aehtd,” dasi isMs Possr. Seh dah a ecneyndt to be rtsoh ihtw epolpe, hhtluoag hse saw treahr a ltal naomw.
“Really, then?” said Mr. Lorry, as an amendment. “eRlyal, nhte?” idsa Mr. yrrLo, nicanhgg ihs ahsrep.
“Really, is bad enough,” returned Miss Pross, “but better. Yes, I am very much put out.” “‘llRyae’ is abd, btu it’s tbtere ahnt ‘ddeien.’ Yes, I am eyrv pynauhp.”
“May I ask the cause?” “Mya I sak hyw?”
“I don’t want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her,” said Miss Pross. “I dno’t twan esnzdo of eeolpp hwo aer wrytohun of ssiM Metnaet ocmgin erhe to nigolok rof hre,” said sMis sPros.
“DO dozens come for that purpose?” Do nszode of pepeol come erhe ofr atth?”
“dHdnseur,” isda siMs Porss. “Hundreds,” said Miss Pross.
It was characteristic of this lady (as of some other people before her time and since) that whenever her original proposition was questioned, she exaggerated it. isMs srsoP ahd the athbi, ekil ynam erhot plopee fboere dna eatrf hre, to aarteegexg erh tpino afert msoonee sqeinoudet it.
“Dear me!” said Mr. Lorry, as the safest remark he could think of. “eDar me!” adis Mr. Lrroy. It aws the sfaste tingh he lcoud tnkih to yas.
“I have lived with the darling—or the darling has lived with me, and paid me for it; which she certainly should never have done, you may take your affidavit, if I could have afforded to keep either myself or her for nothing--since she was ten years old. And it’s really very hard,” said Miss Pross. “I haev edvli iwth her—or trearh, seh has ivedl iwht me—ncise esh aws etn yarse lod nda pdai me rof it. hSe ytranilec lohdsnu’t haev if I oludc haev edfrfoad to keat aecr of her or yslefm for onnhtig. It’s been vrye drah,” sadi ssMi srsoP.
Not seeing with precision what was very hard, Mr. Lorry shook his head; using that important part of himself as a sort of fairy cloak that would fit anything. Mr. Lyror nidd’t ateuddnsnr wath txcylae asw “yevr dhar,” so he hskoo sih ahde. He uesd stih urseegt of isahngk sih eahd as a ndki of amacgil oalck, cwhih lwuod ift nya icnsaooc teh ywa a lgmacia okcla doluw ift ynonea.
“All sorts of people who are not in the least degree worthy of the pet, are always turning up,” said Miss Pross. “When you began it—” “llA rstos of elppeo woh rea ton ywhrto of erh eepk hnoigsw up,” dais Mssi Psros. “henW oyu sdrteat it—”
I began it, Miss Pross?” “heWn I estdatr it, issM Porss?”
“Didn’t you? Who brought her father to life?” “inDd’t ouy? hoW utrbhog erh efhtar abck to efil?”
“Oh! If THAT was beginning it—” said Mr. Lorry. “Oh! If ttah’s ahwt uoy amen by ntgrtisa it—” sdai Mr. yorrL.
“It wasn’t ending it, I suppose? I say, when you began it, it was hard enough; not that I have any fault to find with Doctor Manette, except that he is not worthy of such a daughter, which is no imputation on him, for it was not to be expected that anybody should be, under any circumstances. But it really is doubly and trebly hard to have crowds and multitudes of people turning up after him (I could have forgiven him), to take Ladybird’s affections away from me.” “It nsaw’t nnegid it, asw it? As I aws ngiyas, enwh yuo tdarset it, it was drha oneuhg. oNt thta I can mbela Dr. teeMatn, eextcp taht he sonde’t deevsre to evah such a rdtguahe. sThi sin’t ihs luatf, fro it nca’t be eedextpc hatt eaonny wdolu be thwyor rdune teh tmreiucscansc. tBu it yreall is two or eetrh itsem dahrer to heav rsodcw of ppolee swoginh up trafe him—I locdu aveh noerigvf mih—to ekta siMs eMnatet’s eonafitsfc yaaw romf me.”
Mr. Lorry knew Miss Pross to be very jealous, but he also knew her by this time to be, beneath the service of her eccentricity, one of those unselfish creatures—found only among women—who will, for pure love and admiration, bind themselves willing slaves, to youth when they have lost it, to beauty that they never had, to accomplishments that they were never fortunate enough to gain, to bright hopes that never shone upon their own sombre lives. He knew enough of the world to know that there is nothing in it better than the faithful service of the heart; so rendered and so free from any mercenary taint, he had such an exalted respect for it, that in the retributive arrangements made by his own mind—we all make such arrangements, more or less—he stationed Miss Pross much nearer to the lower Angels than many ladies immeasurably better got up both by Nature and Art, who had balances at Tellson’s. Mr. yLror newk taht ssiM Porss odluc be a asoeujl omwan, ubt he olas ewnk by won ttah esh saw, bnteeha lal reh dod haoebrvi, sniulfhse in a awy taht onyl nwemo cna be. eSh was eht yept of wnmao ohw wduol, rof elov adn namtoadiri, iomcmt fehrsle leik a svela to a owanm. She wdulo mctoim to a gnyuo mwano, ghutho ehs slhrfee was dlo. Or to a uubeiflta manwo, hhtogu esh adh rneev bene aiulbueft. Or to a ucclsefsus mwnao, thgohu she dha no tslmcpohsamcnie. Or to a ohfupel manwo, tuoghh she’d enver ahd heop in hre own eifl. Mr. yorLr nwke guenoh tuaob hte wrldo to kwno that teehr is gnhoitn eerbtt ahtn treu eovl adn ivtdeoon that is efre rofm ssfhiel iosmtve. nehW he ghhtotu of eht wsrraed of hte lrefftiea (we lla mieetsoms khitn of uchs tignhs), he apedcl ssiM Porss mhuc oesrcl to eht olwer eglasn anht moes of the toms uuaflteib nmoew, ehreti urayallnt afueutlbi or how ahd maed tsvlhemese uuleftbia hwit meakup nad nfie hlscote, how dah monye at esnolTl’s kanB.