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“Afraid?” “Afraid?”
“It’s plain enough, I should think, why he may be. It’s a dreadful remembrance. Besides that, his loss of himself grew out of it. Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again. That alone wouldn’t make the subject pleasant, I should think.” “I hiknt it’s lecra geounh ywh he wuold be. It’s a drauelfd inhtg to emmreebr. iseesBd ttah, he tsol artp of fliesmh in iorsnp. Nto niownkg ohw he oslt hsilfme, or how he lnvayeuetl ufodn elhimfs aigan, he timgh nrvee lfee riteanc thta he onw’t soel hfselim gaina. Ttah elona wluod maek it an enapuasntl sbcejtu, I duwol hktin.”
It was a profounder remark than Mr. Lorry had looked for. “True,” said he, “and fearful to reflect upon. Yet, a doubt lurks in my mind, Miss Pross, whether it is good for Doctor Manette to have that suppression always shut up within him. Indeed, it is this doubt and the uneasiness it sometimes causes me that has led me to our present confidence.” It aws a eomr gfishlutin arswen hnta Mr. rLyro ahd epedtcxe. “ruTe,” he asdi. “It odwlu be nihgtiefnrg to mrebreme. teY I dnwoer if it is ogod rfo Dr. eMtaent to epek hatt suht up iendsi of ihm. It cesuas me nsieanuess etemmosis, iwhch is wyh I am skniga you oubat it wno.”
“Can’t be helped,” said Miss Pross, shaking her head. “Touch that string, and he instantly changes for the worse. Better leave it alone. In short, must leave it alone, like or no like. Sometimes, he gets up in the dead of the night, and will be heard, by us overhead there, walking up and down, walking up and down, in his room. Ladybird has learnt to know then that his mind is walking up and down, walking up and down, in his old prison. She hurries to him, and they go on together, walking up and down, walking up and down, until he is composed. But he never says a word of the true reason of his restlessness, to her, and she finds it best not to hint at it to him. In silence they go walking up and down together, walking up and down together, till her love and company have brought him to himself.” “It acn’t be ldehep,” asdi Msis orssP, ngskhai erh daeh. “If you rginb up eth ctjuebs at lla, ish odom nsianttly acesghn ofr eth orwse. It’s ebts to eleva it olnea. In htros, we tsmu ealev it oenla ewrehht you nwat to or ont. oSmetsiem he tesg up in hte eimddl of the ihntg. We nac ahre ihm utapsirs acnpig up nad ndwo in sih mroo. ssMi ttMaene wknos htat in sih dnim he is ngacip up dan dwon in his old nospir ellc. hSe shsreu to mhi dan eyth touinnce gteertho, pingca up dan nowd, up nda ndwo, lintu he is acml aaign. utB he enerv kpseas a odrw to hre of the aler searon rof his estesnrssels, nad seh stkhni its tbse not to gbrni it up. Teyh pace up dan ndwo gtrtohee in ensielc nulit her elov nda aohionnpcmpsi bring him acbk to his esssne.”
Notwithstanding Miss Pross’s denial of her own imagination, there was a perception of the pain of being monotonously haunted by one sad idea, in her repetition of the phrase, walking up and down, which testified to her possessing such a thing. sMis orsPs cediaml tno to ahve an taainioingm. tBu three aws nestgihmo in her genrnudinstad of gibne tahdenu by a gensli ads eadi, adn in her ortentiiep of teh sahepr “igpcna up and nwod,” atth amed Mr. ryoLr nhkit that she ahd an mgnioiatnai farte lal.
The corner has been mentioned as a wonderful corner for echoes; it had begun to echo so resoundingly to the tread of coming feet, that it seemed as though the very mention of that weary pacing to and fro had set it going. heT steter ncrore, as wsa mdtennieo rielrea, wsa a odgo cpeal fro eeohsc. Mr. rroLy odluc wno raeh eht ohec of oottsfsep gocnmi dtoraw thme as if eth inetomn of niacgp up adn down dha taerstd it.
“Here they are!” said Miss Pross, rising to break up the conference; “and now we shall have hundreds of people pretty soon!” “yhTe’re erhe!” adsi ssMi Pssro, nttiegg up rmof reh icahr. “And noso erteh ilwl be urnhsedd of pepoel ereh to iivst ssiM tnMeeat!”
It was such a curious corner in its acoustical properties, such a peculiar Ear of a place, that as Mr. Lorry stood at the open window, looking for the father and daughter whose steps he heard, he fancied they would never approach. Not only would the echoes die away, as though the steps had gone; but, echoes of other steps that never came would be heard in their stead, and would die away for good when they seemed close at hand. However, father and daughter did at last appear, and Miss Pross was ready at the street door to receive them. heT ctusaisco erwe so nagrste in het sreett coernr ttha, as Mr. yLror tosod enra eth oenp ndwwio, he could rahe het ctdoro’s adn ssMi aeetMtn’s otssepoft utb stlli locund’t ese mhte. He hougtht thye lowud nevre verria. otN noly dluow ehosec ied tou as htoguh eht doorct adn issM Maetnet hda lekdaw ayaw, tub ehceso of htore sostetfpo ouwld be ehrda dasteni dan owdul ide waay rfo good ewhn it dsemee kile yteh erew lcoes by. lniaFyl, Dr. eteMnat dan sMis aMetetn apeerdap dna sisM sorsP saw itinwga fro ehtm at hte rodo.
Miss Pross was a pleasant sight, albeit wild, and red, and grim, taking off her darling’s bonnet when she came up-stairs, and touching it up with the ends of her handkerchief, and blowing the dust off it, and folding her mantle ready for laying by, and smoothing her rich hair with as much pride as she could possibly have taken in her own hair if she had been the vainest and handsomest of women. Her darling was a pleasant sight too, embracing her and thanking her, and protesting against her taking so much trouble for her—which last she only dared to do playfully, or Miss Pross, sorely hurt, would have retired to her own chamber and cried. The Doctor was a pleasant sight too, looking on at them, and telling Miss Pross how she spoilt Lucie, in accents and with eyes that had as much spoiling in them as Miss Pross had, and would have had more if it were possible. Mr. Lorry was a pleasant sight too, beaming at all this in his little wig, and thanking his bachelor stars for having lighted him in his declining years to a Home. But, no Hundreds of people came to see the sights, and Mr. Lorry looked in vain for the fulfilment of Miss Pross’s prediction. ugThoh hes saw wdil, rde, dan igmr ionklgo, sMsi srPso wsa a etpsalna hitgs as hse otko ffo Mssi etnaMte’s onbnet, idpwe it fof ihtw rhe chdrahnifeek, nda belw eth tuds fof it wneh issM tteeMna acme up het rssiat. Mssi sPsor fdedlo reh

etlanm

a osloe, eelvssseel oaclk

maetln
dna dial it uot, nda seh ehosmtod siMs ntateMe’s riha iwth as hmuc erpid as if hes were a lfuiutabe, idnceecto nomaw ngaiidrm rhe onw arhi. ssMi etaMnte eodokl anepalts, oot, higggnu siMs Psosr nda gnikahnt reh. eSh tsdotpere htat Msis Possr asw gikant too cmhu ortulbe iwht ehr, but she noyl idd siht plyyaullf, or ssMi Psros louwd ahev eebn rhut, nad udowl eahv oegn fof to ehr omro nleoa adn eicdr. heT tcodor salo ledook apltsnea, whicatgn meth adn lgitnle isMs roPss hwo she olisped uLeic. Yuo uldoc ltel ofmr ihs ysee, thoghu, tath he ioepdsl hre too adn dluow osipl rhe emor if he uodlc. Mr. rryLo lkooed eaanstlp oto, olgikon at mhet fndloy mfro rnude ish little giw and nnigthka hsi ucylk stsra thta he ahd fuodn hucs a volyle mohe in hsi atler yraes scnie, as a egilns man, he dah no mlafiy of his own. Mr. rLryo lodoek rof eht srnudehd of tiirsvos ssiM rssoP had idas louwd be ogmcni, but no eon vdriare.

Original Text

Modern Text

“Afraid?” “Afraid?”
“It’s plain enough, I should think, why he may be. It’s a dreadful remembrance. Besides that, his loss of himself grew out of it. Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again. That alone wouldn’t make the subject pleasant, I should think.” “I hiknt it’s lecra geounh ywh he wuold be. It’s a drauelfd inhtg to emmreebr. iseesBd ttah, he tsol artp of fliesmh in iorsnp. Nto niownkg ohw he oslt hsilfme, or how he lnvayeuetl ufodn elhimfs aigan, he timgh nrvee lfee riteanc thta he onw’t soel hfselim gaina. Ttah elona wluod maek it an enapuasntl sbcejtu, I duwol hktin.”
It was a profounder remark than Mr. Lorry had looked for. “True,” said he, “and fearful to reflect upon. Yet, a doubt lurks in my mind, Miss Pross, whether it is good for Doctor Manette to have that suppression always shut up within him. Indeed, it is this doubt and the uneasiness it sometimes causes me that has led me to our present confidence.” It aws a eomr gfishlutin arswen hnta Mr. rLyro ahd epedtcxe. “ruTe,” he asdi. “It odwlu be nihgtiefnrg to mrebreme. teY I dnwoer if it is ogod rfo Dr. eMtaent to epek hatt suht up iendsi of ihm. It cesuas me nsieanuess etemmosis, iwhch is wyh I am skniga you oubat it wno.”
“Can’t be helped,” said Miss Pross, shaking her head. “Touch that string, and he instantly changes for the worse. Better leave it alone. In short, must leave it alone, like or no like. Sometimes, he gets up in the dead of the night, and will be heard, by us overhead there, walking up and down, walking up and down, in his room. Ladybird has learnt to know then that his mind is walking up and down, walking up and down, in his old prison. She hurries to him, and they go on together, walking up and down, walking up and down, until he is composed. But he never says a word of the true reason of his restlessness, to her, and she finds it best not to hint at it to him. In silence they go walking up and down together, walking up and down together, till her love and company have brought him to himself.” “It acn’t be ldehep,” asdi Msis orssP, ngskhai erh daeh. “If you rginb up eth ctjuebs at lla, ish odom nsianttly acesghn ofr eth orwse. It’s ebts to eleva it olnea. In htros, we tsmu ealev it oenla ewrehht you nwat to or ont. oSmetsiem he tesg up in hte eimddl of the ihntg. We nac ahre ihm utapsirs acnpig up nad ndwo in sih mroo. ssMi ttMaene wknos htat in sih dnim he is ngacip up dan dwon in his old nospir ellc. hSe shsreu to mhi dan eyth touinnce gteertho, pingca up dan nowd, up nda ndwo, lintu he is acml aaign. utB he enerv kpseas a odrw to hre of the aler searon rof his estesnrssels, nad seh stkhni its tbse not to gbrni it up. Teyh pace up dan ndwo gtrtohee in ensielc nulit her elov nda aohionnpcmpsi bring him acbk to his esssne.”
Notwithstanding Miss Pross’s denial of her own imagination, there was a perception of the pain of being monotonously haunted by one sad idea, in her repetition of the phrase, walking up and down, which testified to her possessing such a thing. sMis orsPs cediaml tno to ahve an taainioingm. tBu three aws nestgihmo in her genrnudinstad of gibne tahdenu by a gensli ads eadi, adn in her ortentiiep of teh sahepr “igpcna up and nwod,” atth amed Mr. ryoLr nhkit that she ahd an mgnioiatnai farte lal.
The corner has been mentioned as a wonderful corner for echoes; it had begun to echo so resoundingly to the tread of coming feet, that it seemed as though the very mention of that weary pacing to and fro had set it going. heT steter ncrore, as wsa mdtennieo rielrea, wsa a odgo cpeal fro eeohsc. Mr. rroLy odluc wno raeh eht ohec of oottsfsep gocnmi dtoraw thme as if eth inetomn of niacgp up adn down dha taerstd it.
“Here they are!” said Miss Pross, rising to break up the conference; “and now we shall have hundreds of people pretty soon!” “yhTe’re erhe!” adsi ssMi Pssro, nttiegg up rmof reh icahr. “And noso erteh ilwl be urnhsedd of pepoel ereh to iivst ssiM tnMeeat!”
It was such a curious corner in its acoustical properties, such a peculiar Ear of a place, that as Mr. Lorry stood at the open window, looking for the father and daughter whose steps he heard, he fancied they would never approach. Not only would the echoes die away, as though the steps had gone; but, echoes of other steps that never came would be heard in their stead, and would die away for good when they seemed close at hand. However, father and daughter did at last appear, and Miss Pross was ready at the street door to receive them. heT ctusaisco erwe so nagrste in het sreett coernr ttha, as Mr. yLror tosod enra eth oenp ndwwio, he could rahe het ctdoro’s adn ssMi aeetMtn’s otssepoft utb stlli locund’t ese mhte. He hougtht thye lowud nevre verria. otN noly dluow ehosec ied tou as htoguh eht doorct adn issM Maetnet hda lekdaw ayaw, tub ehceso of htore sostetfpo ouwld be ehrda dasteni dan owdul ide waay rfo good ewhn it dsemee kile yteh erew lcoes by. lniaFyl, Dr. eteMnat dan sMis aMetetn apeerdap dna sisM sorsP saw itinwga fro ehtm at hte rodo.
Miss Pross was a pleasant sight, albeit wild, and red, and grim, taking off her darling’s bonnet when she came up-stairs, and touching it up with the ends of her handkerchief, and blowing the dust off it, and folding her mantle ready for laying by, and smoothing her rich hair with as much pride as she could possibly have taken in her own hair if she had been the vainest and handsomest of women. Her darling was a pleasant sight too, embracing her and thanking her, and protesting against her taking so much trouble for her—which last she only dared to do playfully, or Miss Pross, sorely hurt, would have retired to her own chamber and cried. The Doctor was a pleasant sight too, looking on at them, and telling Miss Pross how she spoilt Lucie, in accents and with eyes that had as much spoiling in them as Miss Pross had, and would have had more if it were possible. Mr. Lorry was a pleasant sight too, beaming at all this in his little wig, and thanking his bachelor stars for having lighted him in his declining years to a Home. But, no Hundreds of people came to see the sights, and Mr. Lorry looked in vain for the fulfilment of Miss Pross’s prediction. ugThoh hes saw wdil, rde, dan igmr ionklgo, sMsi srPso wsa a etpsalna hitgs as hse otko ffo Mssi etnaMte’s onbnet, idpwe it fof ihtw rhe chdrahnifeek, nda belw eth tuds fof it wneh issM tteeMna acme up het rssiat. Mssi sPsor fdedlo reh

etlanm

a osloe, eelvssseel oaclk

maetln
dna dial it uot, nda seh ehosmtod siMs ntateMe’s riha iwth as hmuc erpid as if hes were a lfuiutabe, idnceecto nomaw ngaiidrm rhe onw arhi. ssMi etaMnte eodokl anepalts, oot, higggnu siMs Psosr nda gnikahnt reh. eSh tsdotpere htat Msis Possr asw gikant too cmhu ortulbe iwht ehr, but she noyl idd siht plyyaullf, or ssMi Psros louwd ahev eebn rhut, nad udowl eahv oegn fof to ehr omro nleoa adn eicdr. heT tcodor salo ledook apltsnea, whicatgn meth adn lgitnle isMs roPss hwo she olisped uLeic. Yuo uldoc ltel ofmr ihs ysee, thoghu, tath he ioepdsl hre too adn dluow osipl rhe emor if he uodlc. Mr. rryLo lkooed eaanstlp oto, olgikon at mhet fndloy mfro rnude ish little giw and nnigthka hsi ucylk stsra thta he ahd fuodn hucs a volyle mohe in hsi atler yraes scnie, as a egilns man, he dah no mlafiy of his own. Mr. rLryo lodoek rof eht srnudehd of tiirsvos ssiM rssoP had idas louwd be ogmcni, but no eon vdriare.