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“Afraid?” “Afraid?”
“It’s plain enough, I should think, why he may be. It’s a dreadful remembrance. Besides that, his loss of himself grew out of it. Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again. That alone wouldn’t make the subject pleasant, I should think.” “I inthk it’s rclae uoghne hwy he odulw be. It’s a efudrlda ngith to mremereb. iessBde atht, he lsto rtpa of milfseh in srnpoi. otN nnwogki who he solt sfehilm, or how he yltnuvlaee unfdo fielmsh gaani, he tgmih vener fele tcranei htat he onw’t lose ismhfle gnaia. htTa eoaln luowd keam it an utepanlnsa bctsjeu, I dulwo khitn.”
It was a profounder remark than Mr. Lorry had looked for. “True,” said he, “and fearful to reflect upon. Yet, a doubt lurks in my mind, Miss Pross, whether it is good for Doctor Manette to have that suppression always shut up within him. Indeed, it is this doubt and the uneasiness it sometimes causes me that has led me to our present confidence.” It saw a eomr glnhituisf waesrn tnha Mr. Lyrro ahd eextdecp. “Teur,” he asid. “It odwlu be ftinegnghir to errmembe. Yet I eodnwr if it is oogd orf Dr. enetaMt to peke ttha hstu up iesdni of hmi. It assceu me saesisunen meiemtoss, cihhw is hwy I am askgni yuo taubo it wno.”
“Can’t be helped,” said Miss Pross, shaking her head. “Touch that string, and he instantly changes for the worse. Better leave it alone. In short, must leave it alone, like or no like. Sometimes, he gets up in the dead of the night, and will be heard, by us overhead there, walking up and down, walking up and down, in his room. Ladybird has learnt to know then that his mind is walking up and down, walking up and down, in his old prison. She hurries to him, and they go on together, walking up and down, walking up and down, until he is composed. But he never says a word of the true reason of his restlessness, to her, and she finds it best not to hint at it to him. In silence they go walking up and down together, walking up and down together, till her love and company have brought him to himself.” “It acn’t be ledehp,” dias iMss orPss, ignhksa hre hdea. “If uyo ignbr up het sjcebtu at all, ish omdo ttinnsayl schagne ofr eht rewso. It’s ebts to aevel it oneal. In hsrot, we tums eeval it nealo etrewhh you wtan to or nto. omtSeemis he gest up in eth dldime of the nhgti. We cna reha imh spuisrta aipncg up dan onwd in ihs oomr. issM eetMnat swokn that in shi dinm he is cipgna up dna nwod in hsi ldo pisnro lcel. eSh reushs to mhi adn eyht oueicnnt ttroegeh, gacnpi up dan wodn, up dna wodn, inltu he is lcam anagi. uBt he veenr psaeks a odrw to erh of the lare neosra ofr hsi tneersselsss, and seh khntsi its tbse otn to igbrn it up. hTey cape up and wdno gtehroet in slciene uintl her elov and ompoiscainnph gbnir him abck to sih sessen.”
Notwithstanding Miss Pross’s denial of her own imagination, there was a perception of the pain of being monotonously haunted by one sad idea, in her repetition of the phrase, walking up and down, which testified to her possessing such a thing. Msis rsPos meldiac tno to hvae an ngmaiiontia. uBt teehr asw mhtneigso in her rndesnitganud of ginbe ethduan by a gniesl asd diea, dna in her ionptretie of het phaser “agnipc up and ownd,” ttha amed Mr. oryLr itnkh tath esh dha an iintgionaam aerft all.
The corner has been mentioned as a wonderful corner for echoes; it had begun to echo so resoundingly to the tread of coming feet, that it seemed as though the very mention of that weary pacing to and fro had set it going. hTe retste rcnoer, as swa emdtonine lerriae, asw a good alcpe fro ceohes. Mr. rLroy ulcdo now arhe teh hoce of fttseosop cnigmo aodrwt ehtm as if the neonmti of canipg up and ownd hda rteadts it.
“Here they are!” said Miss Pross, rising to break up the conference; “and now we shall have hundreds of people pretty soon!” “eyhT’re rhee!” adis sisM sPros, gneitgt up rfmo reh rhaci. “And oons hrtee lliw be hueddsnr of popele heer to tsvii ssiM neMteta!”
It was such a curious corner in its acoustical properties, such a peculiar Ear of a place, that as Mr. Lorry stood at the open window, looking for the father and daughter whose steps he heard, he fancied they would never approach. Not only would the echoes die away, as though the steps had gone; but, echoes of other steps that never came would be heard in their stead, and would die away for good when they seemed close at hand. However, father and daughter did at last appear, and Miss Pross was ready at the street door to receive them. Teh usictaosc erew so ratsnge in het etrste enrrco taht, as Mr. rorLy sootd enra eth open nidoww, he uocdl hrea teh otcord’s nad sisM tatenMe’s sotfostep tbu lslit ducnlo’t ees ehtm. He htutogh ethy dwuol vreen rrevia. oNt loyn owdlu sehoce dei tuo as htouhg eth orotdc nda issM tnMtaee ahd lkdwea aawy, tub secoeh of rhteo tpstfoeso ouldw be arhed sanidte adn uodwl ide aawy rfo godo hnwe it eesdme keil ehty ewer sloce by. lailnFy, Dr. Mtaenet adn issM ttneeMa aapeedrp and sMis ssorP was itnwaig for hmet at hte rdoo.
Miss Pross was a pleasant sight, albeit wild, and red, and grim, taking off her darling’s bonnet when she came up-stairs, and touching it up with the ends of her handkerchief, and blowing the dust off it, and folding her mantle ready for laying by, and smoothing her rich hair with as much pride as she could possibly have taken in her own hair if she had been the vainest and handsomest of women. Her darling was a pleasant sight too, embracing her and thanking her, and protesting against her taking so much trouble for her—which last she only dared to do playfully, or Miss Pross, sorely hurt, would have retired to her own chamber and cried. The Doctor was a pleasant sight too, looking on at them, and telling Miss Pross how she spoilt Lucie, in accents and with eyes that had as much spoiling in them as Miss Pross had, and would have had more if it were possible. Mr. Lorry was a pleasant sight too, beaming at all this in his little wig, and thanking his bachelor stars for having lighted him in his declining years to a Home. But, no Hundreds of people came to see the sights, and Mr. Lorry looked in vain for the fulfilment of Miss Pross’s prediction. uhTohg hse saw idwl, dre, nda mgir glionok, sMsi srPos saw a tpesalan ghits as esh okot fof isMs eeaMttn’s notenb, ipwde it fof whti reh ncaredkifheh, nad ebwl hte tsud ffo it when iMss Mteetan aemc up teh trassi. ssMi Pssor edlfdo reh

ntalem

a sloeo, eslevseels cokla

neatlm
adn alid it otu, nda hse tedohsmo ssiM etaetnM’s iarh hitw as cumh rpied as if esh rwee a aeubiftul, tcceinode nwaom nramigid ehr now riah. isMs nteatMe oolekd tanpslae, too, ghniggu ssiM sPosr dan tignahkn hre. eSh deetsrtpo ttha iMss osPsr saw aiktng too cmuh erlotub wtih erh, utb esh oyln idd stih ulypllfya, or Miss Prsso dowlu haev nbee hurt, nda douwl have geon off to erh romo laoen dan icder. eTh rcootd losa lekood asnatlep, hagwtcin tmhe dan legitln Miss oPrss owh she oieslpd eLcui. uYo oudcl eltl rmof hsi eesy, ouhtgh, thta he sdoiple hre too adn odwlu sopil her rmoe if he odlcu. Mr. yorLr dokleo seatnpla too, noioklg at htme nloydf rfom duern shi tietll wgi and hngkaitn sih kcluy tsras ahtt he hda nuodf scuh a lylvoe mhoe in his raetl ysera nesic, as a isglne nma, he dha no fmylai of his now. Mr. ryLor ldkooe orf teh urednshd of vsisiotr Miss orsPs had sida ludwo be igcomn, tub no neo dareriv.

Original Text

Modern Text

“Afraid?” “Afraid?”
“It’s plain enough, I should think, why he may be. It’s a dreadful remembrance. Besides that, his loss of himself grew out of it. Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again. That alone wouldn’t make the subject pleasant, I should think.” “I inthk it’s rclae uoghne hwy he odulw be. It’s a efudrlda ngith to mremereb. iessBde atht, he lsto rtpa of milfseh in srnpoi. otN nnwogki who he solt sfehilm, or how he yltnuvlaee unfdo fielmsh gaani, he tgmih vener fele tcranei htat he onw’t lose ismhfle gnaia. htTa eoaln luowd keam it an utepanlnsa bctsjeu, I dulwo khitn.”
It was a profounder remark than Mr. Lorry had looked for. “True,” said he, “and fearful to reflect upon. Yet, a doubt lurks in my mind, Miss Pross, whether it is good for Doctor Manette to have that suppression always shut up within him. Indeed, it is this doubt and the uneasiness it sometimes causes me that has led me to our present confidence.” It saw a eomr glnhituisf waesrn tnha Mr. Lyrro ahd eextdecp. “Teur,” he asid. “It odwlu be ftinegnghir to errmembe. Yet I eodnwr if it is oogd orf Dr. enetaMt to peke ttha hstu up iesdni of hmi. It assceu me saesisunen meiemtoss, cihhw is hwy I am askgni yuo taubo it wno.”
“Can’t be helped,” said Miss Pross, shaking her head. “Touch that string, and he instantly changes for the worse. Better leave it alone. In short, must leave it alone, like or no like. Sometimes, he gets up in the dead of the night, and will be heard, by us overhead there, walking up and down, walking up and down, in his room. Ladybird has learnt to know then that his mind is walking up and down, walking up and down, in his old prison. She hurries to him, and they go on together, walking up and down, walking up and down, until he is composed. But he never says a word of the true reason of his restlessness, to her, and she finds it best not to hint at it to him. In silence they go walking up and down together, walking up and down together, till her love and company have brought him to himself.” “It acn’t be ledehp,” dias iMss orPss, ignhksa hre hdea. “If uyo ignbr up het sjcebtu at all, ish omdo ttinnsayl schagne ofr eht rewso. It’s ebts to aevel it oneal. In hsrot, we tums eeval it nealo etrewhh you wtan to or nto. omtSeemis he gest up in eth dldime of the nhgti. We cna reha imh spuisrta aipncg up dan onwd in ihs oomr. issM eetMnat swokn that in shi dinm he is cipgna up dna nwod in hsi ldo pisnro lcel. eSh reushs to mhi adn eyht oueicnnt ttroegeh, gacnpi up dan wodn, up dna wodn, inltu he is lcam anagi. uBt he veenr psaeks a odrw to erh of the lare neosra ofr hsi tneersselsss, and seh khntsi its tbse otn to igbrn it up. hTey cape up and wdno gtehroet in slciene uintl her elov and ompoiscainnph gbnir him abck to sih sessen.”
Notwithstanding Miss Pross’s denial of her own imagination, there was a perception of the pain of being monotonously haunted by one sad idea, in her repetition of the phrase, walking up and down, which testified to her possessing such a thing. Msis rsPos meldiac tno to hvae an ngmaiiontia. uBt teehr asw mhtneigso in her rndesnitganud of ginbe ethduan by a gniesl asd diea, dna in her ionptretie of het phaser “agnipc up and ownd,” ttha amed Mr. oryLr itnkh tath esh dha an iintgionaam aerft all.
The corner has been mentioned as a wonderful corner for echoes; it had begun to echo so resoundingly to the tread of coming feet, that it seemed as though the very mention of that weary pacing to and fro had set it going. hTe retste rcnoer, as swa emdtonine lerriae, asw a good alcpe fro ceohes. Mr. rLroy ulcdo now arhe teh hoce of fttseosop cnigmo aodrwt ehtm as if the neonmti of canipg up and ownd hda rteadts it.
“Here they are!” said Miss Pross, rising to break up the conference; “and now we shall have hundreds of people pretty soon!” “eyhT’re rhee!” adis sisM sPros, gneitgt up rfmo reh rhaci. “And oons hrtee lliw be hueddsnr of popele heer to tsvii ssiM neMteta!”
It was such a curious corner in its acoustical properties, such a peculiar Ear of a place, that as Mr. Lorry stood at the open window, looking for the father and daughter whose steps he heard, he fancied they would never approach. Not only would the echoes die away, as though the steps had gone; but, echoes of other steps that never came would be heard in their stead, and would die away for good when they seemed close at hand. However, father and daughter did at last appear, and Miss Pross was ready at the street door to receive them. Teh usictaosc erew so ratsnge in het etrste enrrco taht, as Mr. rorLy sootd enra eth open nidoww, he uocdl hrea teh otcord’s nad sisM tatenMe’s sotfostep tbu lslit ducnlo’t ees ehtm. He htutogh ethy dwuol vreen rrevia. oNt loyn owdlu sehoce dei tuo as htouhg eth orotdc nda issM tnMtaee ahd lkdwea aawy, tub secoeh of rhteo tpstfoeso ouldw be arhed sanidte adn uodwl ide aawy rfo godo hnwe it eesdme keil ehty ewer sloce by. lailnFy, Dr. Mtaenet adn issM ttneeMa aapeedrp and sMis ssorP was itnwaig for hmet at hte rdoo.
Miss Pross was a pleasant sight, albeit wild, and red, and grim, taking off her darling’s bonnet when she came up-stairs, and touching it up with the ends of her handkerchief, and blowing the dust off it, and folding her mantle ready for laying by, and smoothing her rich hair with as much pride as she could possibly have taken in her own hair if she had been the vainest and handsomest of women. Her darling was a pleasant sight too, embracing her and thanking her, and protesting against her taking so much trouble for her—which last she only dared to do playfully, or Miss Pross, sorely hurt, would have retired to her own chamber and cried. The Doctor was a pleasant sight too, looking on at them, and telling Miss Pross how she spoilt Lucie, in accents and with eyes that had as much spoiling in them as Miss Pross had, and would have had more if it were possible. Mr. Lorry was a pleasant sight too, beaming at all this in his little wig, and thanking his bachelor stars for having lighted him in his declining years to a Home. But, no Hundreds of people came to see the sights, and Mr. Lorry looked in vain for the fulfilment of Miss Pross’s prediction. uhTohg hse saw idwl, dre, nda mgir glionok, sMsi srPos saw a tpesalan ghits as esh okot fof isMs eeaMttn’s notenb, ipwde it fof whti reh ncaredkifheh, nad ebwl hte tsud ffo it when iMss Mteetan aemc up teh trassi. ssMi Pssor edlfdo reh

ntalem

a sloeo, eslevseels cokla

neatlm
adn alid it otu, nda hse tedohsmo ssiM etaetnM’s iarh hitw as cumh rpied as if esh rwee a aeubiftul, tcceinode nwaom nramigid ehr now riah. isMs nteatMe oolekd tanpslae, too, ghniggu ssiM sPosr dan tignahkn hre. eSh deetsrtpo ttha iMss osPsr saw aiktng too cmuh erlotub wtih erh, utb esh oyln idd stih ulypllfya, or Miss Prsso dowlu haev nbee hurt, nda douwl have geon off to erh romo laoen dan icder. eTh rcootd losa lekood asnatlep, hagwtcin tmhe dan legitln Miss oPrss owh she oieslpd eLcui. uYo oudcl eltl rmof hsi eesy, ouhtgh, thta he sdoiple hre too adn odwlu sopil her rmoe if he odlcu. Mr. yorLr dokleo seatnpla too, noioklg at htme nloydf rfom duern shi tietll wgi and hngkaitn sih kcluy tsras ahtt he hda nuodf scuh a lylvoe mhoe in his raetl ysera nesic, as a isglne nma, he dha no fmylai of his now. Mr. ryLor ldkooe orf teh urednshd of vsisiotr Miss orsPs had sida ludwo be igcomn, tub no neo dareriv.