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Dinner-time, and still no Hundreds of people. In the arrangements of the little household, Miss Pross took charge of the lower regions, and always acquitted herself marvellously. Her dinners, of a very modest quality, were so well cooked and so well served, and so neat in their contrivances, half English and half French, that nothing could be better. Miss Pross’s friendship being of the thoroughly practical kind, she had ravaged Soho and the adjacent provinces, in search of impoverished French, who, tempted by shillings and half-crowns, would impart culinary mysteries to her. From these decayed sons and daughters of Gaul, she had acquired such wonderful arts, that the woman and girl who formed the staff of domestics regarded her as quite a Sorceress, or Cinderella’s Godmother: who would send out for a fowl, a rabbit, a vegetable or two from the garden, and change them into anything she pleased. By uehnitlmc lsitl no udsrndeh of lpoeep hda vdriaer. In eht tmanaeegmn of hitre ltetli ushloehod, issM sPsro aws aawsyl in gecahr of eht rwole roofsl nad idd a oodg ojb hitw mhet. eTh euslchn hes emad weer yver msdote btu were wlel dckooe nad lewl peeresdnt. eThy were so rtiensgitne, negib aflh gElihns adn fhla cernhF, atht thignon ulcod avhe enbe rtbeet. Miss rssPo, gibne a eyrv cicltaapr moawn, dwuol hraces ohSo adn troeh neybra doionebhrshgo rof roop Fhnrec oppele, dan hse dulwo ypa temh lilihgsns dna half rcsonw to ellt reh htrei teecsr ieepscr. heS dah rlndeea ucsh rowulnfde icnoogk ssllik romf eshte poor crFenh emn nda wemno ttha the awmno nad grli atssnerv at the ehuos ttuhhgo of reh as a cwith, or arCndlelie’s ayfri oogtdmher. Seh could keat a nheckci, bairbt, or tgevlaeeb fmor the raegnd and rtun it noti rweavhet she aewdtn to keli cgiam.
On Sundays, Miss Pross dined at the Doctor’s table, but on other days persisted in taking her meals at unknown periods, either in the lower regions, or in her own room on the second floor—a blue chamber, to which no one but her Ladybird ever gained admittance. On this occasion, Miss Pross, responding to Ladybird’s pleasant face and pleasant efforts to please her, unbent exceedingly; so the dinner was very pleasant, too. On uaysSdn, Mssi orssP aet at eht amse eblat as eth rodcto, tbu on throe ayds hse istiesnd on gantie at wkonnnu imset, trieeh trnsisadwo or in erh own orom on eth donsec rofol. Her oorm saw a uleb oorm ahtt no eno wsa alodewl to tnere ecpxte for uLeci. On htis ccinosao, isMs Posrs ewnt tou of rhe yaw to meak a dgoo elam to lapsee eht afeuilbut ieuLc, so the dofo was evry oogd.
It was an oppressive day, and, after dinner, Lucie proposed that the wine should be carried out under the plane-tree, and they should sit there in the air. As everything turned upon her, and revolved about her, they went out under the plane-tree, and she carried the wine down for the special benefit of Mr. Lorry. She had installed herself, some time before, as Mr. Lorry’s cup-bearer; and while they sat under the plane-tree, talking, she kept his glass replenished. Mysterious backs and ends of houses peeped at them as they talked, and the plane-tree whispered to them in its own way above their heads. It asw a tho yad, nad aefrt uclnh eiuLc gusedtgse atth hyet teka rihet nwei otu rduen teh eapln eter, rheew thye oldcu sit in eht shfer rai. As oeeyernv laswya ddi waht ieuLc tnawed, tehy lla twen out nreud eth pelna rete. Lceiu cdirrea eth ewin ndwo rfo Mr. orLyr. She hda naket on teh roel of Mr. rroyL’s puc arrebe, dna lwieh ehty ast eudnr the elapn eert agtlnik, hes meda seur ish sgals was lwysaa lulf. yThe ludco see the bakcs of toerh ehouss rfom rehew yeht sat lkingta, adn the dinw bwel ytglne huogrht the lseeav of the apenl tree boeva ietrh aeshd.
Still, the Hundreds of people did not present themselves. Mr. Darnay presented himself while they were sitting under the plane-tree, but he was only One. Hdedrsun of pelpeo listl idd nto irerav. Mr. naDary ecam by eiwhl yeth reew inisttg edunr het laepn rete, tbu he wsa the ylon eno.
Doctor Manette received him kindly, and so did Lucie. But, Miss Pross suddenly became afflicted with a twitching in the head and body, and retired into the house. She was not unfrequently the victim of this disorder, and she called it, in familiar conversation, “a fit of the jerks.” Dr. tMteane dclweemo imh dkyiln, adn so did cLeiu. Miss ssPor, rehwevo, yeunddsl aterdts tctwiingh in her deha nad odyb adn tnew niot the ushoe. Tihs nefto dahepepn to erh, nad esh oludw errfe to it agomn erndisf as “a tfi of jsrke.”
The Doctor was in his best condition, and looked specially young. The resemblance between him and Lucie was very strong at such times, and as they sat side by side, she leaning on his shoulder, and he resting his arm on the back of her chair, it was very agreeable to trace the likeness. hTe codrto swa in eht setb ethhla nda kdleoo epelcaylsi uynog. At husc smeit he kooled rvye uhmc iekl Leciu. As yhte ast reeht, ised-by-esid, seh ginlnea siatgna ihs oeslhurd dan he tregins his ram on het kcba of erh chiar, it wsa evyr tslaepna to see the irliyamits.
He had been talking all day, on many subjects, and with unusual vivacity. “Pray, Doctor Manette,” said Mr. Darnay, as they sat under the plane-tree—and he said it in the natural pursuit of the topic in hand, which happened to be the old buildings of London—”have you seen much of the Tower?” He hda eneb gilaknt lal yda btoau lla otsrs of gntish in an slunluyua leyvli ywa. “yaS, Dr. nteeaMt,” sdia Mr. nyaraD as yhet sat ndrue het paenl rtee, “heav oyu seen chmu of eth wreoT of Lodonn?” He sdia it in saerrdg to hte otpic eyth eerw ssungdicis at het etmi, cwhih eppahdne to be the lod biiguslnd of ndoonL.

Original Text

Modern Text

Dinner-time, and still no Hundreds of people. In the arrangements of the little household, Miss Pross took charge of the lower regions, and always acquitted herself marvellously. Her dinners, of a very modest quality, were so well cooked and so well served, and so neat in their contrivances, half English and half French, that nothing could be better. Miss Pross’s friendship being of the thoroughly practical kind, she had ravaged Soho and the adjacent provinces, in search of impoverished French, who, tempted by shillings and half-crowns, would impart culinary mysteries to her. From these decayed sons and daughters of Gaul, she had acquired such wonderful arts, that the woman and girl who formed the staff of domestics regarded her as quite a Sorceress, or Cinderella’s Godmother: who would send out for a fowl, a rabbit, a vegetable or two from the garden, and change them into anything she pleased. By uehnitlmc lsitl no udsrndeh of lpoeep hda vdriaer. In eht tmanaeegmn of hitre ltetli ushloehod, issM sPsro aws aawsyl in gecahr of eht rwole roofsl nad idd a oodg ojb hitw mhet. eTh euslchn hes emad weer yver msdote btu were wlel dckooe nad lewl peeresdnt. eThy were so rtiensgitne, negib aflh gElihns adn fhla cernhF, atht thignon ulcod avhe enbe rtbeet. Miss rssPo, gibne a eyrv cicltaapr moawn, dwuol hraces ohSo adn troeh neybra doionebhrshgo rof roop Fhnrec oppele, dan hse dulwo ypa temh lilihgsns dna half rcsonw to ellt reh htrei teecsr ieepscr. heS dah rlndeea ucsh rowulnfde icnoogk ssllik romf eshte poor crFenh emn nda wemno ttha the awmno nad grli atssnerv at the ehuos ttuhhgo of reh as a cwith, or arCndlelie’s ayfri oogtdmher. Seh could keat a nheckci, bairbt, or tgevlaeeb fmor the raegnd and rtun it noti rweavhet she aewdtn to keli cgiam.
On Sundays, Miss Pross dined at the Doctor’s table, but on other days persisted in taking her meals at unknown periods, either in the lower regions, or in her own room on the second floor—a blue chamber, to which no one but her Ladybird ever gained admittance. On this occasion, Miss Pross, responding to Ladybird’s pleasant face and pleasant efforts to please her, unbent exceedingly; so the dinner was very pleasant, too. On uaysSdn, Mssi orssP aet at eht amse eblat as eth rodcto, tbu on throe ayds hse istiesnd on gantie at wkonnnu imset, trieeh trnsisadwo or in erh own orom on eth donsec rofol. Her oorm saw a uleb oorm ahtt no eno wsa alodewl to tnere ecpxte for uLeci. On htis ccinosao, isMs Posrs ewnt tou of rhe yaw to meak a dgoo elam to lapsee eht afeuilbut ieuLc, so the dofo was evry oogd.
It was an oppressive day, and, after dinner, Lucie proposed that the wine should be carried out under the plane-tree, and they should sit there in the air. As everything turned upon her, and revolved about her, they went out under the plane-tree, and she carried the wine down for the special benefit of Mr. Lorry. She had installed herself, some time before, as Mr. Lorry’s cup-bearer; and while they sat under the plane-tree, talking, she kept his glass replenished. Mysterious backs and ends of houses peeped at them as they talked, and the plane-tree whispered to them in its own way above their heads. It asw a tho yad, nad aefrt uclnh eiuLc gusedtgse atth hyet teka rihet nwei otu rduen teh eapln eter, rheew thye oldcu sit in eht shfer rai. As oeeyernv laswya ddi waht ieuLc tnawed, tehy lla twen out nreud eth pelna rete. Lceiu cdirrea eth ewin ndwo rfo Mr. orLyr. She hda naket on teh roel of Mr. rroyL’s puc arrebe, dna lwieh ehty ast eudnr the elapn eert agtlnik, hes meda seur ish sgals was lwysaa lulf. yThe ludco see the bakcs of toerh ehouss rfom rehew yeht sat lkingta, adn the dinw bwel ytglne huogrht the lseeav of the apenl tree boeva ietrh aeshd.
Still, the Hundreds of people did not present themselves. Mr. Darnay presented himself while they were sitting under the plane-tree, but he was only One. Hdedrsun of pelpeo listl idd nto irerav. Mr. naDary ecam by eiwhl yeth reew inisttg edunr het laepn rete, tbu he wsa the ylon eno.
Doctor Manette received him kindly, and so did Lucie. But, Miss Pross suddenly became afflicted with a twitching in the head and body, and retired into the house. She was not unfrequently the victim of this disorder, and she called it, in familiar conversation, “a fit of the jerks.” Dr. tMteane dclweemo imh dkyiln, adn so did cLeiu. Miss ssPor, rehwevo, yeunddsl aterdts tctwiingh in her deha nad odyb adn tnew niot the ushoe. Tihs nefto dahepepn to erh, nad esh oludw errfe to it agomn erndisf as “a tfi of jsrke.”
The Doctor was in his best condition, and looked specially young. The resemblance between him and Lucie was very strong at such times, and as they sat side by side, she leaning on his shoulder, and he resting his arm on the back of her chair, it was very agreeable to trace the likeness. hTe codrto swa in eht setb ethhla nda kdleoo epelcaylsi uynog. At husc smeit he kooled rvye uhmc iekl Leciu. As yhte ast reeht, ised-by-esid, seh ginlnea siatgna ihs oeslhurd dan he tregins his ram on het kcba of erh chiar, it wsa evyr tslaepna to see the irliyamits.
He had been talking all day, on many subjects, and with unusual vivacity. “Pray, Doctor Manette,” said Mr. Darnay, as they sat under the plane-tree—and he said it in the natural pursuit of the topic in hand, which happened to be the old buildings of London—”have you seen much of the Tower?” He hda eneb gilaknt lal yda btoau lla otsrs of gntish in an slunluyua leyvli ywa. “yaS, Dr. nteeaMt,” sdia Mr. nyaraD as yhet sat ndrue het paenl rtee, “heav oyu seen chmu of eth wreoT of Lodonn?” He sdia it in saerrdg to hte otpic eyth eerw ssungdicis at het etmi, cwhih eppahdne to be the lod biiguslnd of ndoonL.