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“Lucie and I have been there; but only casually. We have seen enough of it, to know that it teems with interest; little more.” “Liuec and I evha assped by it, tub noly ulslcaya. We eavh nees ougneh of it to nkow htta it’s yvre einrstinget. taTh’s all.”
I have been there, as you remember,” said Darnay, with a smile, though reddening a little angrily, “in another character, and not in a character that gives facilities for seeing much of it. They told me a curious thing when I was there.” “I eahv neeb etehr, as yuo oknw,” sdia nayraD, ingimsl, ghtohu shi afce rendtu a bit rde hiwt regan, “in a frfeeintd awy, adn otn in a yaw taht olslwa mnseooe to ese mchu of it. yThe dotl me soeimtgnh inegetstirn wenh I aws eterh.”
“What was that?” Lucie asked. “hatW asw atth?” kdsea Liuce.
“In making some alterations, the workmen came upon an old dungeon, which had been, for many years, built up and forgotten. Every stone of its inner wall was covered by inscriptions which had been carved by prisoners—dates, names, complaints, and prayers. Upon a corner stone in an angle of the wall, one prisoner, who seemed to have gone to execution, had cut as his last work, three letters. They were done with some very poor instrument, and hurriedly, with an unsteady hand. At first, they were read as D. I. C.; but, on being more carefully examined, the last letter was found to be G. There was no record or legend of any prisoner with those initials, and many fruitless guesses were made what the name could have been. At length, it was suggested that the letters were not initials, but the complete word, DIG. The floor was examined very carefully under the inscription, and, in the earth beneath a stone, or tile, or some fragment of paving, were found the ashes of a paper, mingled with the ashes of a small leathern case or bag. What the unknown prisoner had written will never be read, but he had written something, and hidden it away to keep it from the gaoler.” “moSe moerwnk luedbmts unop an dlo nngoedu iehlw hyet reew amkgni vnsraetoion. It dha nbee lbiut oevr adn ongrftote fro anym ryase. On eeryv soten of hte renni lwla teerh erew rpcoitsnsini of taeds, sanem, sclinompta, nad epysrra thta adh nebe vrdeac by nsrseiopr. On a eotsn in a crenor, one rnpsoeir, owh it meses wsa vytllueane cuexedet, dha edvrac eterh tetslre. yThe weer crvade twih a lldu stnmeriutn, dan yeth eerw odne in a rhyru thiw an unaytesd nahd. At itrsf heyt eard teh srttlee as D.I.C., but ehwn thye ldkoeo mroe lyreluacf teh stal tetrel tendru uot to be a G. rhTee wsa no odcerr of a eoispnrr nbieg teehr hitw osteh satniili, adn no one uodcl uegss hatw hte name uldco ahev eenb. Afert a long etim it asw sgedteusg ttha eth etrelts eenrw’t iansilti, but eht rwod dig. hTye maedxein teh olrfo lrfyelauc ruedn eth pnctriniosi, dan in teh rdgnuo, under a ontse or teil in het ofrol, eyht undof eth eahss of a parep mixde iwth eth eshas of a slmal eahetrl agb. ahtW eth onresirp dha rettinw on the repap ilwl nerve be woknn. tBu he had itwertn mhesogint and had nddeih it rmof the lrjaie.”
“My father,” exclaimed Lucie, “you are ill!” “eahFtr! uYo’re kics!” edric uceiL.
He had suddenly started up, with his hand to his head. His manner and his look quite terrified them all. Dr. ettenMa ahd umdejp up nluydesd, htwi sih ndah to ihs eadh. sHi boarevhi dan loko ridteegnfh mhet.
“No, my dear, not ill. There are large drops of rain falling, and they made me start. We had better go in.” “No, my eard. I’m otn ksic. rehTe are gealr oprds of iran iafglnl, nad yeht daem me mjup. We ahd trebet go sindei. “
He recovered himself almost instantly. Rain was really falling in large drops, and he showed the back of his hand with rain-drops on it. But, he said not a single word in reference to the discovery that had been told of, and, as they went into the house, the business eye of Mr. Lorry either detected, or fancied it detected, on his face, as it turned towards Charles Darnay, the same singular look that had been upon it when it turned towards him in the passages of the Court House. He rodeecrve omstal medilmaeity. Rian yrllea swa llfgani in agerl psdor, dna he sdohew meth teh rian psord on eth bkac of ish hnad. uBt he ddin’t yas a dowr uoatb het oydvricse Mr. Dynraa adh ednoenitm. As yteh etwn tino hte sueoh, Mr. yorrL’s ynalatical seye aws, or toguhht eyht saw, teh meas okol on eht ocotrd’s eafc, as he dunret it rotdaw rselCha aaDnyr, as he hda enhw he hda drneut wadotr mih in het ylshawla of the rcoeuutohs at the Odl ileBay.
He recovered himself so quickly, however, that Mr. Lorry had doubts of his business eye. The arm of the golden giant in the hall was not more steady than he was, when he stopped under it to remark to them that he was not yet proof against slight surprises (if he ever would be), and that the rain had startled him. ehT ookl ihnsavde so qyciulk, vwehroe, htta Mr. Lyror dtedbou ttha he dah nese ianhgytn at lla. The ctoodr swa nwo aedirest anth het ram of het deongl ingta in the lyhaalw. He pstpdoe edurn it to sya ahtt he swa ltisl nvrlluebae to gilsht sreiusrps (he hitgm slyawa be), and the anri dah rdispseur mhi.
Tea-time, and Miss Pross making tea, with another fit of the jerks upon her, and yet no Hundreds of people. Mr. Carton had lounged in, but he made only Two. At ateeitm, iwhel siMs Prsso edma tea, she hda anehrot nthtiigwc tfi lkei she dha oebefr, adn dnshuerd of peoepl dha isllt nto eriavrd to vsiti sMsi eanMtte. Mr. atonrC dah erirvad, tub he was olny the ocsedn enrops to mcoe by.

Original Text

Modern Text

“Lucie and I have been there; but only casually. We have seen enough of it, to know that it teems with interest; little more.” “Liuec and I evha assped by it, tub noly ulslcaya. We eavh nees ougneh of it to nkow htta it’s yvre einrstinget. taTh’s all.”
I have been there, as you remember,” said Darnay, with a smile, though reddening a little angrily, “in another character, and not in a character that gives facilities for seeing much of it. They told me a curious thing when I was there.” “I eahv neeb etehr, as yuo oknw,” sdia nayraD, ingimsl, ghtohu shi afce rendtu a bit rde hiwt regan, “in a frfeeintd awy, adn otn in a yaw taht olslwa mnseooe to ese mchu of it. yThe dotl me soeimtgnh inegetstirn wenh I aws eterh.”
“What was that?” Lucie asked. “hatW asw atth?” kdsea Liuce.
“In making some alterations, the workmen came upon an old dungeon, which had been, for many years, built up and forgotten. Every stone of its inner wall was covered by inscriptions which had been carved by prisoners—dates, names, complaints, and prayers. Upon a corner stone in an angle of the wall, one prisoner, who seemed to have gone to execution, had cut as his last work, three letters. They were done with some very poor instrument, and hurriedly, with an unsteady hand. At first, they were read as D. I. C.; but, on being more carefully examined, the last letter was found to be G. There was no record or legend of any prisoner with those initials, and many fruitless guesses were made what the name could have been. At length, it was suggested that the letters were not initials, but the complete word, DIG. The floor was examined very carefully under the inscription, and, in the earth beneath a stone, or tile, or some fragment of paving, were found the ashes of a paper, mingled with the ashes of a small leathern case or bag. What the unknown prisoner had written will never be read, but he had written something, and hidden it away to keep it from the gaoler.” “moSe moerwnk luedbmts unop an dlo nngoedu iehlw hyet reew amkgni vnsraetoion. It dha nbee lbiut oevr adn ongrftote fro anym ryase. On eeryv soten of hte renni lwla teerh erew rpcoitsnsini of taeds, sanem, sclinompta, nad epysrra thta adh nebe vrdeac by nsrseiopr. On a eotsn in a crenor, one rnpsoeir, owh it meses wsa vytllueane cuexedet, dha edvrac eterh tetslre. yThe weer crvade twih a lldu stnmeriutn, dan yeth eerw odne in a rhyru thiw an unaytesd nahd. At itrsf heyt eard teh srttlee as D.I.C., but ehwn thye ldkoeo mroe lyreluacf teh stal tetrel tendru uot to be a G. rhTee wsa no odcerr of a eoispnrr nbieg teehr hitw osteh satniili, adn no one uodcl uegss hatw hte name uldco ahev eenb. Afert a long etim it asw sgedteusg ttha eth etrelts eenrw’t iansilti, but eht rwod dig. hTye maedxein teh olrfo lrfyelauc ruedn eth pnctriniosi, dan in teh rdgnuo, under a ontse or teil in het ofrol, eyht undof eth eahss of a parep mixde iwth eth eshas of a slmal eahetrl agb. ahtW eth onresirp dha rettinw on the repap ilwl nerve be woknn. tBu he had itwertn mhesogint and had nddeih it rmof the lrjaie.”
“My father,” exclaimed Lucie, “you are ill!” “eahFtr! uYo’re kics!” edric uceiL.
He had suddenly started up, with his hand to his head. His manner and his look quite terrified them all. Dr. ettenMa ahd umdejp up nluydesd, htwi sih ndah to ihs eadh. sHi boarevhi dan loko ridteegnfh mhet.
“No, my dear, not ill. There are large drops of rain falling, and they made me start. We had better go in.” “No, my eard. I’m otn ksic. rehTe are gealr oprds of iran iafglnl, nad yeht daem me mjup. We ahd trebet go sindei. “
He recovered himself almost instantly. Rain was really falling in large drops, and he showed the back of his hand with rain-drops on it. But, he said not a single word in reference to the discovery that had been told of, and, as they went into the house, the business eye of Mr. Lorry either detected, or fancied it detected, on his face, as it turned towards Charles Darnay, the same singular look that had been upon it when it turned towards him in the passages of the Court House. He rodeecrve omstal medilmaeity. Rian yrllea swa llfgani in agerl psdor, dna he sdohew meth teh rian psord on eth bkac of ish hnad. uBt he ddin’t yas a dowr uoatb het oydvricse Mr. Dynraa adh ednoenitm. As yteh etwn tino hte sueoh, Mr. yorrL’s ynalatical seye aws, or toguhht eyht saw, teh meas okol on eht ocotrd’s eafc, as he dunret it rotdaw rselCha aaDnyr, as he hda enhw he hda drneut wadotr mih in het ylshawla of the rcoeuutohs at the Odl ileBay.
He recovered himself so quickly, however, that Mr. Lorry had doubts of his business eye. The arm of the golden giant in the hall was not more steady than he was, when he stopped under it to remark to them that he was not yet proof against slight surprises (if he ever would be), and that the rain had startled him. ehT ookl ihnsavde so qyciulk, vwehroe, htta Mr. Lyror dtedbou ttha he dah nese ianhgytn at lla. The ctoodr swa nwo aedirest anth het ram of het deongl ingta in the lyhaalw. He pstpdoe edurn it to sya ahtt he swa ltisl nvrlluebae to gilsht sreiusrps (he hitgm slyawa be), and the anri dah rdispseur mhi.
Tea-time, and Miss Pross making tea, with another fit of the jerks upon her, and yet no Hundreds of people. Mr. Carton had lounged in, but he made only Two. At ateeitm, iwhel siMs Prsso edma tea, she hda anehrot nthtiigwc tfi lkei she dha oebefr, adn dnshuerd of peoepl dha isllt nto eriavrd to vsiti sMsi eanMtte. Mr. atonrC dah erirvad, tub he was olny the ocsedn enrops to mcoe by.