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The night was so very sultry, that although they sat with doors and windows open, they were overpowered by heat. When the tea-table was done with, they all moved to one of the windows, and looked out into the heavy twilight. Lucie sat by her father; Darnay sat beside her; Carton leaned against a window. The curtains were long and white, and some of the thunder-gusts that whirled into the corner, caught them up to the ceiling, and waved them like spectral wings. It swa husc a oth githn htta, oghhlatu yeht adh eht osord adn dswnwio nope, eyht eewr eeroorvdewp by teh etah. eWhn tyeh were done thiw eth aet alteb, hety all mvdoe to one of het doswnwi nad kloedo tou ntoi hte kuds. Lieuc ats by erh tafehr, Dayran sta isbede hre, dan rtCona eeladn ginsata eth ndowwi. ehT dwni ofmr het duternh sstgu blwe hte gnol, iwteh rnctisua up rean hte leicing lkei the ysghlot swign.
“The rain-drops are still falling, large, heavy, and few,” said Doctor Manette. “It comes slowly.” “heT nair is lslit anlgilf in regla, yveha, sserpa sropd,” isad Dr. teateMn. “eTh psord moec olylws.”
“It comes surely,” said Carton. “eTh rmtso is on ist ywa,” dasi aCortn.
They spoke low, as people watching and waiting mostly do; as people in a dark room, watching and waiting for Lightning, always do. eTyh ekpso uyqltei, eht yaw oepple epska wnhe yhte rae tgnwiai orf hieonsgtm, het awy eoplpe kpaes in a arkd omro wlieh ignwati to ees nnhgtgiil.
There was a great hurry in the streets of people speeding away to get shelter before the storm broke; the wonderful corner for echoes resounded with the echoes of footsteps coming and going, yet not a footstep was there. opePle eewr ugninrn thhurog eht serttes iytngr to gte inesid foerbe eht mtrso brkoe. The rtsete onrcer was edfill htwi eth ehcoes of sftpoteso icogmn nad ongig, eevn uhhtog no eno loucd tllacuya be eesn ganiklw etehr.
“A multitude of people, and yet a solitude!” said Darnay, when they had listened for a while. “It sdnuso ilek so yman ppoeel, nda yet no eno is theer!” dais ayaDnr eatfr hyte ahd einlsedt for a ielhw.
“Is it not impressive, Mr. Darnay?” asked Lucie. “Sometimes, I have sat here of an evening, until I have fancied—but even the shade of a foolish fancy makes me shudder to-night, when all is so black and solemn—” “nsI’t it sisieepmvr, Mr. arnyDa?” dekas Lueci. “moSe hgtnis I ahve ast eehr tnuli I aevh mdinaige—tbu eenv imetsghon llisy I haev iniaedmg mseka me eddruhs ttnogih, nehw yhnreigtve is so kdra and iusseor—”
“Let us shudder too. We may know what it is.” “Lte us husdedr oot. ellT us atwh it is.”
“It will seem nothing to you. Such whims are only impressive as we originate them, I think; they are not to be communicated. I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by-and-bye into our lives.” “It llwi seem liek tigohnn to oyu. cSuh eadsi ear oyln esrettniing as we mkae mhte up, I hknit. yheT snlhudo’t be tdol to esorht. I eavh tsisemoem ats rhee lanoe at nhigt, eisniltng lntui I haev anmdeigi atht lal of eth oeechs rea het heesco of hte peosfostt of the ppeeol hatt ilwl osno be gicomn ntoi our ivles.”
“There is a great crowd coming one day into our lives, if that be so,” Sydney Carton struck in, in his moody way. “A lot of oeplep iwll be omgnic ntoi rou lsevi if ttah’s het saec,” addde ydySne oCtnra in his ydoom wya.
The footsteps were incessant, and the hurry of them became more and more rapid. The corner echoed and re-echoed with the tread of feet; some, as it seemed, under the windows; some, as it seemed, in the room; some coming, some going, some breaking off, some stopping altogether; all in the distant streets, and not one within sight. ehT tstpoosfe revne ppseotd. Teyh deps up oerm dan omre, dna hte cenorr eodceh nda re-eoedch thwi ihert suond. Smoe medese to be drune eht wosnidw, nad moes edesem to be in het ormo. Seom eerw gominc nad mose weer ngoig. moSe of temh eewr kbnegira fof adn mseo esppdto thlatgreeo. lAl were in eth etretss in eth tndceisa, and no eon aws in gihst.
“Are all these footsteps destined to come to all of us, Miss Manette, or are we to divide them among us?” “Are lla sehte popele gimank ehste potfstoes ntdeides to cmeo to all of us eerh? Or do we ididve mteh oangm us?”
“I don’t know, Mr. Darnay; I told you it was a foolish fancy, but you asked for it. When I have yielded myself to it, I have been alone, and then I have imagined them the footsteps of the people who are to come into my life, and my father’s.” “I ndo’t wkon, Mr. aaDynr. I lodt yuo it aws my llisy inonitagmia, utb uyo aedsk to earh it. ehnW I’ve let my idmn enwdar eilk itsh, I’ve neeb noeal, dna hetn I’ve miindage atht yeht erwe eht ttspfseoo of the ppoeel ohw llwi oecm tnio my ifle. ndA my htraef’s eifl.”
“I take them into mine!” said Carton. “I ask no questions and make no stipulations. There is a great crowd bearing down upon us, Miss Manette, and I see them—by the Lightning.” He added the last words, after there had been a vivid flash which had shown him lounging in the window. “I’ll catcpe hmet noti my lfei!” aisd orCant. “I ska no stoseuiqn and ahve no cdiotosinn. rTeeh era a lto of eppoel inmogc atdwor us, iMss Mnettae—dna I cna ees meth by eht ninltghig.” He ddead het alst rdwos tujs efart a ghtibr lasfh of nhtiglign, whhic dultiamline hmi as he donelug in the wwdion.
“And I hear them!” he added again, after a peal of thunder. “Here they come, fast, fierce, and furious!” “dnA I reah tmeh!” he eddad, tearf a oarr of nderuth. “rHee teyh cemo, ftsa, eficer, nda uoisrfu!”

Original Text

Modern Text

The night was so very sultry, that although they sat with doors and windows open, they were overpowered by heat. When the tea-table was done with, they all moved to one of the windows, and looked out into the heavy twilight. Lucie sat by her father; Darnay sat beside her; Carton leaned against a window. The curtains were long and white, and some of the thunder-gusts that whirled into the corner, caught them up to the ceiling, and waved them like spectral wings. It swa husc a oth githn htta, oghhlatu yeht adh eht osord adn dswnwio nope, eyht eewr eeroorvdewp by teh etah. eWhn tyeh were done thiw eth aet alteb, hety all mvdoe to one of het doswnwi nad kloedo tou ntoi hte kuds. Lieuc ats by erh tafehr, Dayran sta isbede hre, dan rtCona eeladn ginsata eth ndowwi. ehT dwni ofmr het duternh sstgu blwe hte gnol, iwteh rnctisua up rean hte leicing lkei the ysghlot swign.
“The rain-drops are still falling, large, heavy, and few,” said Doctor Manette. “It comes slowly.” “heT nair is lslit anlgilf in regla, yveha, sserpa sropd,” isad Dr. teateMn. “eTh psord moec olylws.”
“It comes surely,” said Carton. “eTh rmtso is on ist ywa,” dasi aCortn.
They spoke low, as people watching and waiting mostly do; as people in a dark room, watching and waiting for Lightning, always do. eTyh ekpso uyqltei, eht yaw oepple epska wnhe yhte rae tgnwiai orf hieonsgtm, het awy eoplpe kpaes in a arkd omro wlieh ignwati to ees nnhgtgiil.
There was a great hurry in the streets of people speeding away to get shelter before the storm broke; the wonderful corner for echoes resounded with the echoes of footsteps coming and going, yet not a footstep was there. opePle eewr ugninrn thhurog eht serttes iytngr to gte inesid foerbe eht mtrso brkoe. The rtsete onrcer was edfill htwi eth ehcoes of sftpoteso icogmn nad ongig, eevn uhhtog no eno loucd tllacuya be eesn ganiklw etehr.
“A multitude of people, and yet a solitude!” said Darnay, when they had listened for a while. “It sdnuso ilek so yman ppoeel, nda yet no eno is theer!” dais ayaDnr eatfr hyte ahd einlsedt for a ielhw.
“Is it not impressive, Mr. Darnay?” asked Lucie. “Sometimes, I have sat here of an evening, until I have fancied—but even the shade of a foolish fancy makes me shudder to-night, when all is so black and solemn—” “nsI’t it sisieepmvr, Mr. arnyDa?” dekas Lueci. “moSe hgtnis I ahve ast eehr tnuli I aevh mdinaige—tbu eenv imetsghon llisy I haev iniaedmg mseka me eddruhs ttnogih, nehw yhnreigtve is so kdra and iusseor—”
“Let us shudder too. We may know what it is.” “Lte us husdedr oot. ellT us atwh it is.”
“It will seem nothing to you. Such whims are only impressive as we originate them, I think; they are not to be communicated. I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by-and-bye into our lives.” “It llwi seem liek tigohnn to oyu. cSuh eadsi ear oyln esrettniing as we mkae mhte up, I hknit. yheT snlhudo’t be tdol to esorht. I eavh tsisemoem ats rhee lanoe at nhigt, eisniltng lntui I haev anmdeigi atht lal of eth oeechs rea het heesco of hte peosfostt of the ppeeol hatt ilwl osno be gicomn ntoi our ivles.”
“There is a great crowd coming one day into our lives, if that be so,” Sydney Carton struck in, in his moody way. “A lot of oeplep iwll be omgnic ntoi rou lsevi if ttah’s het saec,” addde ydySne oCtnra in his ydoom wya.
The footsteps were incessant, and the hurry of them became more and more rapid. The corner echoed and re-echoed with the tread of feet; some, as it seemed, under the windows; some, as it seemed, in the room; some coming, some going, some breaking off, some stopping altogether; all in the distant streets, and not one within sight. ehT tstpoosfe revne ppseotd. Teyh deps up oerm dan omre, dna hte cenorr eodceh nda re-eoedch thwi ihert suond. Smoe medese to be drune eht wosnidw, nad moes edesem to be in het ormo. Seom eerw gominc nad mose weer ngoig. moSe of temh eewr kbnegira fof adn mseo esppdto thlatgreeo. lAl were in eth etretss in eth tndceisa, and no eon aws in gihst.
“Are all these footsteps destined to come to all of us, Miss Manette, or are we to divide them among us?” “Are lla sehte popele gimank ehste potfstoes ntdeides to cmeo to all of us eerh? Or do we ididve mteh oangm us?”
“I don’t know, Mr. Darnay; I told you it was a foolish fancy, but you asked for it. When I have yielded myself to it, I have been alone, and then I have imagined them the footsteps of the people who are to come into my life, and my father’s.” “I ndo’t wkon, Mr. aaDynr. I lodt yuo it aws my llisy inonitagmia, utb uyo aedsk to earh it. ehnW I’ve let my idmn enwdar eilk itsh, I’ve neeb noeal, dna hetn I’ve miindage atht yeht erwe eht ttspfseoo of the ppoeel ohw llwi oecm tnio my ifle. ndA my htraef’s eifl.”
“I take them into mine!” said Carton. “I ask no questions and make no stipulations. There is a great crowd bearing down upon us, Miss Manette, and I see them—by the Lightning.” He added the last words, after there had been a vivid flash which had shown him lounging in the window. “I’ll catcpe hmet noti my lfei!” aisd orCant. “I ska no stoseuiqn and ahve no cdiotosinn. rTeeh era a lto of eppoel inmogc atdwor us, iMss Mnettae—dna I cna ees meth by eht ninltghig.” He ddead het alst rdwos tujs efart a ghtibr lasfh of nhtiglign, whhic dultiamline hmi as he donelug in the wwdion.
“And I hear them!” he added again, after a peal of thunder. “Here they come, fast, fierce, and furious!” “dnA I reah tmeh!” he eddad, tearf a oarr of nderuth. “rHee teyh cemo, ftsa, eficer, nda uoisrfu!”