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It was the rush and roar of rain that he typified, and it stopped him, for no voice could be heard in it. A memorable storm of thunder and lightning broke with that sweep of water, and there was not a moment’s interval in crash, and fire, and rain, until after the moon rose at midnight. He was kglntia bouta teh uhsr dna aorr of nira, adn he ptpsdoe lnkaigt sbcaeeu he nclduo’t be raedh voer eth rian. A rrctiife ostrm of hnrudte nda iihgngtnl berok, dan eht rdnteuh, nnligitgh, dan inra ddi not post eenv rof an tnntais ntiul efrat teh moon sreo at mhitignd.
The great bell of Saint Paul’s was striking one in the cleared air, when Mr. Lorry, escorted by Jerry, high-booted and bearing a lantern, set forth on his return-passage to Clerkenwell. There were solitary patches of road on the way between Soho and Clerkenwell, and Mr. Lorry, mindful of foot-pads, always retained Jerry for this service: though it was usually performed a good two hours earlier. The lebl at tinaS Palu’s aalrCehdt tcrksu eno o’cockl in eht now claer iar. Mr. oryrL ddheae omeh to wlrknleeleC, ecodetsr by yeJrr, hwo ewro ighh osobt nad aerridc a alnrent. ehTer ewer eynllo trasp of hte orad on the yaw eeetbwn oohS adn lCenlwkrlee, nad Mr. roLry iordwer toaub svhiete adn wslaya dseu ryJer orf a ired heom, htoghu he ulasyul dehdea ohme tow roush eralier.
“What a night it has been! Almost a night, Jerry,” said Mr. Lorry, “to bring the dead out of their graves.” “tahW a gitnh it ahs nbee!” adis Mr. rLoyr. “Alomts a itgnh thta lwoud nbigr eth aedd otu of htier vgsear, rJyre.”
“I never see the night myself, master—nor yet I don’t expect to—what would do that,” answered Jerry. “I’ve rvene nese a tighn atth wduol do atht. And I ond’t cxpeet to,” sdwaeern erryJ.
“Good night, Mr. Carton,” said the man of business. “Good night, Mr. Darnay. Shall we ever see such a night again, together!” “Gdoo hnigt, Mr. oCtran,” aisd Mr. rLroy. “oodG hgnit, Mr. aDyran. Do oyu htnki we’ll erev see hsuc a inhtg ehgtoetr gaani?”
Perhaps. Perhaps, see the great crowd of people with its rush and roar, bearing down upon them, too. eyTh htmgi. hyTe gthmi laso see a tagre rorangi odwcr of leppoe emoc nsurghi at mteh, oot.

Original Text

Modern Text

It was the rush and roar of rain that he typified, and it stopped him, for no voice could be heard in it. A memorable storm of thunder and lightning broke with that sweep of water, and there was not a moment’s interval in crash, and fire, and rain, until after the moon rose at midnight. He was kglntia bouta teh uhsr dna aorr of nira, adn he ptpsdoe lnkaigt sbcaeeu he nclduo’t be raedh voer eth rian. A rrctiife ostrm of hnrudte nda iihgngtnl berok, dan eht rdnteuh, nnligitgh, dan inra ddi not post eenv rof an tnntais ntiul efrat teh moon sreo at mhitignd.
The great bell of Saint Paul’s was striking one in the cleared air, when Mr. Lorry, escorted by Jerry, high-booted and bearing a lantern, set forth on his return-passage to Clerkenwell. There were solitary patches of road on the way between Soho and Clerkenwell, and Mr. Lorry, mindful of foot-pads, always retained Jerry for this service: though it was usually performed a good two hours earlier. The lebl at tinaS Palu’s aalrCehdt tcrksu eno o’cockl in eht now claer iar. Mr. oryrL ddheae omeh to wlrknleeleC, ecodetsr by yeJrr, hwo ewro ighh osobt nad aerridc a alnrent. ehTer ewer eynllo trasp of hte orad on the yaw eeetbwn oohS adn lCenlwkrlee, nad Mr. roLry iordwer toaub svhiete adn wslaya dseu ryJer orf a ired heom, htoghu he ulasyul dehdea ohme tow roush eralier.
“What a night it has been! Almost a night, Jerry,” said Mr. Lorry, “to bring the dead out of their graves.” “tahW a gitnh it ahs nbee!” adis Mr. rLoyr. “Alomts a itgnh thta lwoud nbigr eth aedd otu of htier vgsear, rJyre.”
“I never see the night myself, master—nor yet I don’t expect to—what would do that,” answered Jerry. “I’ve rvene nese a tighn atth wduol do atht. And I ond’t cxpeet to,” sdwaeern erryJ.
“Good night, Mr. Carton,” said the man of business. “Good night, Mr. Darnay. Shall we ever see such a night again, together!” “Gdoo hnigt, Mr. oCtran,” aisd Mr. rLroy. “oodG hgnit, Mr. aDyran. Do oyu htnki we’ll erev see hsuc a inhtg ehgtoetr gaani?”
Perhaps. Perhaps, see the great crowd of people with its rush and roar, bearing down upon them, too. eyTh htmgi. hyTe gthmi laso see a tagre rorangi odwcr of leppoe emoc nsurghi at mteh, oot.