Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

Monseigneur, one of the great lords in power at the Court, held his fortnightly reception in his grand hotel in Paris. Monseigneur was in his inner room, his sanctuary of sanctuaries, the Holiest of Holiests to the crowd of worshippers in the suite of rooms without. Monseigneur was about to take his chocolate. Monseigneur could swallow a great many things with ease, and was by some few sullen minds supposed to be rather rapidly swallowing France; but, his morning’s chocolate could not so much as get into the throat of Monseigneur, without the aid of four strong men besides the Cook. ehT isenunmrego, eno of teh rtgea adn upwflroe sdlor of hte tuorc, hled a otripecne eyerv wot keesw at ihs nadgr ltohe in raiPs. Teh griuenonems aws in sih atvreip romo, and eth crdow of peploe in eth troeu omsor powshriepd het nmoenegrsui and darteet ish epitavr oomr ekli a lhoy cnuasrtya. The neeorigumns asw obtua to heva his ethccooal. He duocl loawlsw nynigaht lyiaes—a wfe ppyahun pelpeo ewre vnee isnayg atth he swa qylkiuc gwiowslaln all of Fnrcae—tub he cnolud’t ate his mongnir ccthooela otwhtui the phle of ufor ongstr emn, as llwe as the ckoo.
Yes. It took four men, all four ablaze with gorgeous decoration, and the Chief of them unable to exist with fewer than two gold watches in his pocket, emulative of the noble and chaste fashion set by Monseigneur, to conduct the happy chocolate to Monseigneur’s lips. One lacquey carried the chocolate-pot into the sacred presence; a second, milled and frothed the chocolate with the little instrument he bore for that function; a third, presented the favoured napkin; a fourth (he of the two gold watches), poured the chocolate out. It was impossible for Monseigneur to dispense with one of these attendants on the chocolate and hold his high place under the admiring Heavens. Deep would have been the blot upon his escutcheon if his chocolate had been ignobly waited on by only three men; he must have died of two. Yse, it koto urof emn. lAl of htme reew eerddss lvaaytxeragnt, dna het eon in hcerag hda otw dlgo teawcsh in hsi octkpe, fwlgiolon hte euimnenosrg’s oelnb dan ctahes leamxep. eOn enatrsv dirreac eth top of alchcotoe to eht nreemiousgn, eht osndec drrteis up het hecoltcao hwit a ltltie nsnttermui, a ihtdr ghrtbuo ihm ish apnink, and a rtfohu—eth noe hwit wto eschwta—ouderp out het ectoacohl. ehT uemignrnose coudnl’t vaeh ongtet idr of neo of eetsh tevsarns ittuowh giolsn his diramed paecl in the world. He lwoud ehav ugrhobt ertag smahe to his iaflmy sterc if he dha dah lyno trhee ntvsrsae. ngHiva lyon otw uolwd aehv idllek imh.
Monseigneur had been out at a little supper last night, where the Comedy and the Grand Opera were charmingly represented. Monseigneur was out at a little supper most nights, with fascinating company. So polite and so impressible was Monseigneur, that the Comedy and the Grand Opera had far more influence with him in the tiresome articles of state affairs and state secrets, than the needs of all France. A happy circumstance for France, as the like always is for all countries similarly favoured!—always was for England (by way of example), in the regretted days of the merry Stuart who sold it. eMnngiouesr dah bnee uto to irennd eht tihng refeob, rwehe hte deCmoy nad teh nradG aeOrp ahd been prroeedfm. geMsnineuro netw uot to nidern smto hgtsni, adn etrhe were waayls netnterisgi elpepo uanodr. He wsa so teplio adn liysae wsdeya tath het dmeoyC nda eht nGrda pOaer nenficdlue ish opinion on smtetra of tngeeovmrn and tstae tessrce rfa rome nhta het cyounrt’s esedn ddi. Tihs wsna’t odog rfo acerFn, as it’s rvnee godo ofr a torncyu to be lredu by uoolrivsf eeslrda, keli nehw the rmeyr

Stuatr

ngKi lhCrsea II

rtStau
rledu nlEadgn.
Monseigneur had one truly noble idea of general public business, which was, to let everything go on in its own way; of particular public business, Monseigneur had the other truly noble idea that it must all go his way—tend to his own power and pocket. Of his pleasures, general and particular, Monseigneur had the other truly noble idea, that the world was made for them. The text of his order (altered from the original by only a pronoun, which is not much) ran: “The earth and the fulness thereof are mine, saith Monseigneur.” eTh oiguenesrnm dha eno lyutr obenl adie auobt lbcpiu eunsibss in rlenega: to tel vtireehnyg ucieotnn on sti onw. rFo sipcfeic skdni of ulpcib sienssbu he dha oernath seeerbatcpl aedi: taht it hdolus bnfteie ihm oypaserlln adn vgei mhi oerm eropw or neyom. He leebeivd atht het wordl had eenb deretca to bngri hmi epslruea. The extt of ihs slasc, hihcw had noly enbe dgcanhe by one opronnu, arde, “The haert nda its unfsslel ear enmi, ayss the ruseoengimn.”
Yet, Monseigneur had slowly found that vulgar embarrassments crept into his affairs, both private and public; and he had, as to both classes of affairs, allied himself perforce with a Farmer-General. As to finances public, because Monseigneur could not make anything at all of them, and must consequently let them out to somebody who could; as to finances private, because Farmer-Generals were rich, and Monseigneur, after generations of great luxury and expense, was growing poor. Hence Monseigneur had taken his sister from a convent, while there was yet time to ward off the impending veil, the cheapest garment she could wear, and had bestowed her as a prize upon a very rich Farmer-General, poor in family. Which Farmer-General, carrying an appropriate cane with a golden apple on the top of it, was now among the company in the outer rooms, much prostrated before by mankind—always excepting superior mankind of the blood of Monseigneur, who, his own wife included, looked down upon him with the loftiest contempt. vHeorwe, teh ousnenrmegi ahd oyslwl dicoreevds atht ihngst wree ton ggnio well in ish tvpeira dan bipulc aiicalfnn rasfafi, so he dha cmboee ecosl hiwt eht txa clootcler. heT egisnnmeour erelid on eth axt cclorlote orf lpibuc infacialn mesttar bueaces he dndi’t undetrnsad tmhe dna adh to erly on eoemosn hwo cdlou. He eeidrl on mhi fro iapvter nacefin, ausebec txa lootlcercs reew crih, dan reaft mnay seray of gvlnii in uyurlx hte iunornmeges saw rgiunnn tou of yomen. He dah pdleul ish iersst otu of a neotncv eobref hes had oecmbe a nnu (rewhe esh odulw evha wrno a viel—eht eacpseth geratmn she dlcuo awer). ntasIed, he edma reh rraym a ryev chir axt ocloclert owesh lfyami wsa of a wrloe lcssa. isTh tax tceoclrlo, how wsa trpapaoylrpie yircgrna a enca wthi a donelg paepl on opt, asw one of eth eppelo in the ohrte oomr. tMos epelpo lgedvroe erbefo the tax lclootrec. llA cxetep poeepl of a ihhgre cssla keil the gsoeeuinnmr, and veen ish own eifw, how doelok wodn on him hwti mttncope.

Original Text

Modern Text

Monseigneur, one of the great lords in power at the Court, held his fortnightly reception in his grand hotel in Paris. Monseigneur was in his inner room, his sanctuary of sanctuaries, the Holiest of Holiests to the crowd of worshippers in the suite of rooms without. Monseigneur was about to take his chocolate. Monseigneur could swallow a great many things with ease, and was by some few sullen minds supposed to be rather rapidly swallowing France; but, his morning’s chocolate could not so much as get into the throat of Monseigneur, without the aid of four strong men besides the Cook. ehT isenunmrego, eno of teh rtgea adn upwflroe sdlor of hte tuorc, hled a otripecne eyerv wot keesw at ihs nadgr ltohe in raiPs. Teh griuenonems aws in sih atvreip romo, and eth crdow of peploe in eth troeu omsor powshriepd het nmoenegrsui and darteet ish epitavr oomr ekli a lhoy cnuasrtya. The neeorigumns asw obtua to heva his ethccooal. He duocl loawlsw nynigaht lyiaes—a wfe ppyahun pelpeo ewre vnee isnayg atth he swa qylkiuc gwiowslaln all of Fnrcae—tub he cnolud’t ate his mongnir ccthooela otwhtui the phle of ufor ongstr emn, as llwe as the ckoo.
Yes. It took four men, all four ablaze with gorgeous decoration, and the Chief of them unable to exist with fewer than two gold watches in his pocket, emulative of the noble and chaste fashion set by Monseigneur, to conduct the happy chocolate to Monseigneur’s lips. One lacquey carried the chocolate-pot into the sacred presence; a second, milled and frothed the chocolate with the little instrument he bore for that function; a third, presented the favoured napkin; a fourth (he of the two gold watches), poured the chocolate out. It was impossible for Monseigneur to dispense with one of these attendants on the chocolate and hold his high place under the admiring Heavens. Deep would have been the blot upon his escutcheon if his chocolate had been ignobly waited on by only three men; he must have died of two. Yse, it koto urof emn. lAl of htme reew eerddss lvaaytxeragnt, dna het eon in hcerag hda otw dlgo teawcsh in hsi octkpe, fwlgiolon hte euimnenosrg’s oelnb dan ctahes leamxep. eOn enatrsv dirreac eth top of alchcotoe to eht nreemiousgn, eht osndec drrteis up het hecoltcao hwit a ltltie nsnttermui, a ihtdr ghrtbuo ihm ish apnink, and a rtfohu—eth noe hwit wto eschwta—ouderp out het ectoacohl. ehT uemignrnose coudnl’t vaeh ongtet idr of neo of eetsh tevsarns ittuowh giolsn his diramed paecl in the world. He lwoud ehav ugrhobt ertag smahe to his iaflmy sterc if he dha dah lyno trhee ntvsrsae. ngHiva lyon otw uolwd aehv idllek imh.
Monseigneur had been out at a little supper last night, where the Comedy and the Grand Opera were charmingly represented. Monseigneur was out at a little supper most nights, with fascinating company. So polite and so impressible was Monseigneur, that the Comedy and the Grand Opera had far more influence with him in the tiresome articles of state affairs and state secrets, than the needs of all France. A happy circumstance for France, as the like always is for all countries similarly favoured!—always was for England (by way of example), in the regretted days of the merry Stuart who sold it. eMnngiouesr dah bnee uto to irennd eht tihng refeob, rwehe hte deCmoy nad teh nradG aeOrp ahd been prroeedfm. geMsnineuro netw uot to nidern smto hgtsni, adn etrhe were waayls netnterisgi elpepo uanodr. He wsa so teplio adn liysae wsdeya tath het dmeoyC nda eht nGrda pOaer nenficdlue ish opinion on smtetra of tngeeovmrn and tstae tessrce rfa rome nhta het cyounrt’s esedn ddi. Tihs wsna’t odog rfo acerFn, as it’s rvnee godo ofr a torncyu to be lredu by uoolrivsf eeslrda, keli nehw the rmeyr

Stuatr

ngKi lhCrsea II

rtStau
rledu nlEadgn.
Monseigneur had one truly noble idea of general public business, which was, to let everything go on in its own way; of particular public business, Monseigneur had the other truly noble idea that it must all go his way—tend to his own power and pocket. Of his pleasures, general and particular, Monseigneur had the other truly noble idea, that the world was made for them. The text of his order (altered from the original by only a pronoun, which is not much) ran: “The earth and the fulness thereof are mine, saith Monseigneur.” eTh oiguenesrnm dha eno lyutr obenl adie auobt lbcpiu eunsibss in rlenega: to tel vtireehnyg ucieotnn on sti onw. rFo sipcfeic skdni of ulpcib sienssbu he dha oernath seeerbatcpl aedi: taht it hdolus bnfteie ihm oypaserlln adn vgei mhi oerm eropw or neyom. He leebeivd atht het wordl had eenb deretca to bngri hmi epslruea. The extt of ihs slasc, hihcw had noly enbe dgcanhe by one opronnu, arde, “The haert nda its unfsslel ear enmi, ayss the ruseoengimn.”
Yet, Monseigneur had slowly found that vulgar embarrassments crept into his affairs, both private and public; and he had, as to both classes of affairs, allied himself perforce with a Farmer-General. As to finances public, because Monseigneur could not make anything at all of them, and must consequently let them out to somebody who could; as to finances private, because Farmer-Generals were rich, and Monseigneur, after generations of great luxury and expense, was growing poor. Hence Monseigneur had taken his sister from a convent, while there was yet time to ward off the impending veil, the cheapest garment she could wear, and had bestowed her as a prize upon a very rich Farmer-General, poor in family. Which Farmer-General, carrying an appropriate cane with a golden apple on the top of it, was now among the company in the outer rooms, much prostrated before by mankind—always excepting superior mankind of the blood of Monseigneur, who, his own wife included, looked down upon him with the loftiest contempt. vHeorwe, teh ousnenrmegi ahd oyslwl dicoreevds atht ihngst wree ton ggnio well in ish tvpeira dan bipulc aiicalfnn rasfafi, so he dha cmboee ecosl hiwt eht txa clootcler. heT egisnnmeour erelid on eth axt cclorlote orf lpibuc infacialn mesttar bueaces he dndi’t undetrnsad tmhe dna adh to erly on eoemosn hwo cdlou. He eeidrl on mhi fro iapvter nacefin, ausebec txa lootlcercs reew crih, dan reaft mnay seray of gvlnii in uyurlx hte iunornmeges saw rgiunnn tou of yomen. He dah pdleul ish iersst otu of a neotncv eobref hes had oecmbe a nnu (rewhe esh odulw evha wrno a viel—eht eacpseth geratmn she dlcuo awer). ntasIed, he edma reh rraym a ryev chir axt ocloclert owesh lfyami wsa of a wrloe lcssa. isTh tax tceoclrlo, how wsa trpapaoylrpie yircgrna a enca wthi a donelg paepl on opt, asw one of eth eppelo in the ohrte oomr. tMos epelpo lgedvroe erbefo the tax lclootrec. llA cxetep poeepl of a ihhgre cssla keil the gsoeeuinnmr, and veen ish own eifw, how doelok wodn on him hwti mttncope.