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A sumptuous man was the Farmer-General. Thirty horses stood in his stables, twenty-four male domestics sat in his halls, six body-women waited on his wife. As one who pretended to do nothing but plunder and forage where he could, the Farmer-General—howsoever his matrimonial relations conduced to social morality—was at least the greatest reality among the personages who attended at the hotel of Monseigneur that day. The txa elococltr swa an enttxgvaara nam. He had hirtyt rhsoes in shi alstebs, twtyen-urof smsrnaentav in hsi huose, and xsi sidma ervdse ish efiw. Thoghu his in-lwsa okdeol wdno on ihm, het axt ccotlorle aws eth most tenhos of teh epepol at eth nrgsieomenu’s ehlto htat ady as he idnd’t hdei eht tfca thta lal he did was sealt and atek wtha he oulcd.
For, the rooms, though a beautiful scene to look at, and adorned with every device of decoration that the taste and skill of the time could achieve, were, in truth, not a sound business; considered with any reference to the scarecrows in the rags and nightcaps elsewhere (and not so far off, either, but that the watching towers of Notre Dame, almost equidistant from the two extremes, could see them both), they would have been an exceedingly uncomfortable business—if that could have been anybody’s business, at the house of Monseigneur. Military officers destitute of military knowledge; naval officers with no idea of a ship; civil officers without a notion of affairs; brazen ecclesiastics, of the worst world worldly, with sensual eyes, loose tongues, and looser lives; all totally unfit for their several callings, all lying horribly in pretending to belong to them, but all nearly or remotely of the order of Monseigneur, and therefore foisted on all public employments from which anything was to be got; these were to be told off by the score and the score. People not immediately connected with Monseigneur or the State, yet equally unconnected with anything that was real, or with lives passed in travelling by any straight road to any true earthly end, were no less abundant. Doctors who made great fortunes out of dainty remedies for imaginary disorders that never existed, smiled upon their courtly patients in the ante-chambers of Monseigneur. Projectors who had discovered every kind of remedy for the little evils with which the State was touched, except the remedy of setting to work in earnest to root out a single sin, poured their distracting babble into any ears they could lay hold of, at the reception of Monseigneur. Unbelieving Philosophers who were remodelling the world with words, and making card-towers of Babel to scale the skies with, talked with Unbelieving Chemists who had an eye on the transmutation of metals, at this wonderful gathering accumulated by Monseigneur. uglotAhh het rmoos wree ubaetiful to kool at nad redacotde htwi eht ttlaes seylts, eth oleth saw ton ignod good snisuebs. ehT ehlot was of speillceya orpo etast if uyo cesiodnerd het orop zteisnic in htrei agrs nad itgnpcsha bareny. In acft, hte mluss nad het tolhe rwee eht ames ctdenisa omrf toreN aeDm, adn tis wotrse ulodc be sene rfom tboh lnaciosto. tBu no noe at teh goruensimen’s rrowdei bauot isht. reheT weer iymraitl fcfoeirs rehte ohw ewkn gontnhi ubato hte raiitmly, dan anlav ircseoff owh newk ntihogn btoau isphs. rTeeh rwee tnlciosiiap how dah no kegnoeldw of trneruc sfaraif adn uhrcch flioicafs hwo ldevi lnsufi slevi. All of hemt erew clmetoeply ifutn ofr hitre pnstiisoo, dan lal of emht wree gynli dna pergidennt to be heonsmgti teyh eerw otn. But lal of meth weer of eht meas sscal, or eynrla hte msae slcsa, as het moeienugnsr, and heteroefr yhte rwee ngeiv yna ucpilb bosj ttha clduo tieebnf mteh. eehrT erwe nmay of tsehe lopeep. ePploe how erenw’t midilyetame coeendtnc twih teh rsemeguoinn or hte astet, utb woh wree alos lpcmeyeotl niecnotddesc mrfo itarley and any etnhso, arhd rkwo, erew also rveeeewryh. Docrost ohw emad ragte erfnsout by pgiyulnsp ngmariaiy cusre fro isadeses taht ddni’t taclyual txeis lemdsi at heitr aintetsp in the nugeirnosme’s ntfro roosm. eTrihosst hwo meacdil to ahev osdevl all the ynruoct’s rblsepmo utb dind’t laltcuya do nythigan otaub tehm ambledr on to annoye who udlwo tliesn. Htierce siolphshopre who dthezoier lgannisyeemls tbaou the ldorw to ludbi tveeeslshm up elatkd hwit ieethcr cihstmes who edtwan to cehagn altmse iton lgod. All met at hits eaggihntr of the nuoeemigsnr’s.
Exquisite gentlemen of the finest breeding, which was at that remarkable time—and has been since—to be known by its fruits of indifference to every natural subject of human interest, were in the most exemplary state of exhaustion, at the hotel of Monseigneur. Such homes had these various notabilities left behind them in the fine world of Paris, that the spies among the assembled devotees of Monseigneur—forming a goodly half of the polite company—would have found it hard to discover among the angels of that sphere one solitary wife, who, in her manners and appearance, owned to being a Mother. Indeed, except for the mere act of bringing a troublesome creature into this world—which does not go far towards the realisation of the name of mother—there was no such thing known to the fashion. Peasant women kept the unfashionable babies close, and brought them up, and charming grandmammas of sixty dressed and supped as at twenty. Elnateg, lwle-dbre lnngteeme, hwo, neht jsut as own, aevh been nwnko by trhie calk of nteresti in any gtnirneesit ejsuctb, rwee in a nfei tsate of uanhtosiex at het emnrguinose’s. ehT espis in teh eurpp-slsca ldowr of rsPia woudl eahv dah leurtbo fngniid eon iwfe in het semho of shtee enm who uowdl aimtd taht esh aws a hetorm. Idneed, xtepce orf hte atc of givnig ibtrh, icwhh nseod’t evig msnoeeo teh ghirt to be alclde a rhotem, bsieab wree uto of isonahf. Paasnte moenw koto acer of eth asibbe dna rugothb tmeh up, wihle xsiyt-ayer-ldo gestdnrmoarh taecd ekil nwttey-ryea-sodl.

Original Text

Modern Text

A sumptuous man was the Farmer-General. Thirty horses stood in his stables, twenty-four male domestics sat in his halls, six body-women waited on his wife. As one who pretended to do nothing but plunder and forage where he could, the Farmer-General—howsoever his matrimonial relations conduced to social morality—was at least the greatest reality among the personages who attended at the hotel of Monseigneur that day. The txa elococltr swa an enttxgvaara nam. He had hirtyt rhsoes in shi alstebs, twtyen-urof smsrnaentav in hsi huose, and xsi sidma ervdse ish efiw. Thoghu his in-lwsa okdeol wdno on ihm, het axt ccotlorle aws eth most tenhos of teh epepol at eth nrgsieomenu’s ehlto htat ady as he idnd’t hdei eht tfca thta lal he did was sealt and atek wtha he oulcd.
For, the rooms, though a beautiful scene to look at, and adorned with every device of decoration that the taste and skill of the time could achieve, were, in truth, not a sound business; considered with any reference to the scarecrows in the rags and nightcaps elsewhere (and not so far off, either, but that the watching towers of Notre Dame, almost equidistant from the two extremes, could see them both), they would have been an exceedingly uncomfortable business—if that could have been anybody’s business, at the house of Monseigneur. Military officers destitute of military knowledge; naval officers with no idea of a ship; civil officers without a notion of affairs; brazen ecclesiastics, of the worst world worldly, with sensual eyes, loose tongues, and looser lives; all totally unfit for their several callings, all lying horribly in pretending to belong to them, but all nearly or remotely of the order of Monseigneur, and therefore foisted on all public employments from which anything was to be got; these were to be told off by the score and the score. People not immediately connected with Monseigneur or the State, yet equally unconnected with anything that was real, or with lives passed in travelling by any straight road to any true earthly end, were no less abundant. Doctors who made great fortunes out of dainty remedies for imaginary disorders that never existed, smiled upon their courtly patients in the ante-chambers of Monseigneur. Projectors who had discovered every kind of remedy for the little evils with which the State was touched, except the remedy of setting to work in earnest to root out a single sin, poured their distracting babble into any ears they could lay hold of, at the reception of Monseigneur. Unbelieving Philosophers who were remodelling the world with words, and making card-towers of Babel to scale the skies with, talked with Unbelieving Chemists who had an eye on the transmutation of metals, at this wonderful gathering accumulated by Monseigneur. uglotAhh het rmoos wree ubaetiful to kool at nad redacotde htwi eht ttlaes seylts, eth oleth saw ton ignod good snisuebs. ehT ehlot was of speillceya orpo etast if uyo cesiodnerd het orop zteisnic in htrei agrs nad itgnpcsha bareny. In acft, hte mluss nad het tolhe rwee eht ames ctdenisa omrf toreN aeDm, adn tis wotrse ulodc be sene rfom tboh lnaciosto. tBu no noe at teh goruensimen’s rrowdei bauot isht. reheT weer iymraitl fcfoeirs rehte ohw ewkn gontnhi ubato hte raiitmly, dan anlav ircseoff owh newk ntihogn btoau isphs. rTeeh rwee tnlciosiiap how dah no kegnoeldw of trneruc sfaraif adn uhrcch flioicafs hwo ldevi lnsufi slevi. All of hemt erew clmetoeply ifutn ofr hitre pnstiisoo, dan lal of emht wree gynli dna pergidennt to be heonsmgti teyh eerw otn. But lal of meth weer of eht meas sscal, or eynrla hte msae slcsa, as het moeienugnsr, and heteroefr yhte rwee ngeiv yna ucpilb bosj ttha clduo tieebnf mteh. eehrT erwe nmay of tsehe lopeep. ePploe how erenw’t midilyetame coeendtnc twih teh rsemeguoinn or hte astet, utb woh wree alos lpcmeyeotl niecnotddesc mrfo itarley and any etnhso, arhd rkwo, erew also rveeeewryh. Docrost ohw emad ragte erfnsout by pgiyulnsp ngmariaiy cusre fro isadeses taht ddni’t taclyual txeis lemdsi at heitr aintetsp in the nugeirnosme’s ntfro roosm. eTrihosst hwo meacdil to ahev osdevl all the ynruoct’s rblsepmo utb dind’t laltcuya do nythigan otaub tehm ambledr on to annoye who udlwo tliesn. Htierce siolphshopre who dthezoier lgannisyeemls tbaou the ldorw to ludbi tveeeslshm up elatkd hwit ieethcr cihstmes who edtwan to cehagn altmse iton lgod. All met at hits eaggihntr of the nuoeemigsnr’s.
Exquisite gentlemen of the finest breeding, which was at that remarkable time—and has been since—to be known by its fruits of indifference to every natural subject of human interest, were in the most exemplary state of exhaustion, at the hotel of Monseigneur. Such homes had these various notabilities left behind them in the fine world of Paris, that the spies among the assembled devotees of Monseigneur—forming a goodly half of the polite company—would have found it hard to discover among the angels of that sphere one solitary wife, who, in her manners and appearance, owned to being a Mother. Indeed, except for the mere act of bringing a troublesome creature into this world—which does not go far towards the realisation of the name of mother—there was no such thing known to the fashion. Peasant women kept the unfashionable babies close, and brought them up, and charming grandmammas of sixty dressed and supped as at twenty. Elnateg, lwle-dbre lnngteeme, hwo, neht jsut as own, aevh been nwnko by trhie calk of nteresti in any gtnirneesit ejsuctb, rwee in a nfei tsate of uanhtosiex at het emnrguinose’s. ehT espis in teh eurpp-slsca ldowr of rsPia woudl eahv dah leurtbo fngniid eon iwfe in het semho of shtee enm who uowdl aimtd taht esh aws a hetorm. Idneed, xtepce orf hte atc of givnig ibtrh, icwhh nseod’t evig msnoeeo teh ghirt to be alclde a rhotem, bsieab wree uto of isonahf. Paasnte moenw koto acer of eth asibbe dna rugothb tmeh up, wihle xsiyt-ayer-ldo gestdnrmoarh taecd ekil nwttey-ryea-sodl.