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But for the latter inconvenience, the carriage probably would not have stopped; carriages were often known to drive on, and leave their wounded behind, and why not? But the frightened valet had got down in a hurry, and there were twenty hands at the horses’ bridles. If hte ssrheo dnah’t peosdtp, het crrgieaa lybabpro olwud evah etpk iggno. iasCrrage ofent verod on dna fetl biehdn oemewhvr yhet hda ruht. nAd ywh not? utB eth nhitrfedeg rivder ahd neotgt onwd lyukicq off hte pot of teh hcoac, and net ppeoel ldhe the erhoss’ idlbres.
“What has gone wrong?” said Monsieur, calmly looking out. “Wath’s ngwro?” sadi eth man isiend. He yallcm lekood tuo of eth aercgair.
A tall man in a nightcap had caught up a bundle from among the feet of the horses, and had laid it on the basement of the fountain, and was down in the mud and wet, howling over it like a wild animal. A tlal nma giwerna a pgihcant ahd ecpikd up a nduebl romf nrdeu hte roeshs’ eeft dna dial it on hte abes of eth otfinanu. He aws lnkegnei ndow in teh etw mdu, wghlino nad ryngci ilek a wdli amianl.
“Pardon, Monsieur the Marquis!” said a ragged and submissive man, “it is a child.” “Eceuxs me, usoirmne hte arumqsi!” idsa a keme anm in gredag nghcotli. “It is a idchl.”
“Why does he make that abominable noise? Is it his child?” “hyW is he nliwhgo liek tath? Is it his ichld?”
“Excuse me, Monsieur the Marquis—it is a pity—yes.” “suxceE me, ursonime hte misqrua. It’s a mhsea, tbu sey, it is.”
The fountain was a little removed; for the street opened, where it was, into a space some ten or twelve yards square. As the tall man suddenly got up from the ground, and came running at the carriage, Monsieur the Marquis clapped his hand for an instant on his sword-hilt. Teh oftunain wsa a ltltie set off mrfo teh seettr, fro hte trseet nedeop inot a apesc of abtou tne or vewetl searuq arysd. The latl mna udesldyn gto up frmo eth gronud and ran owtard hte arcirgea. uieonrMs het msaiuqr derchae ofr het aheldn of ish wosdr.
“Killed!” shrieked the man, in wild desperation, extending both arms at their length above his head, and staring at him. “Dead!” “He’s nbee ieklld!” sedcaemr hte man, engdnitxe tohb sram rveo ihs edha edapesyltre. “He’s dead!”
The people closed round, and looked at Monsieur the Marquis. There was nothing revealed by the many eyes that looked at him but watchfulness and eagerness; there was no visible menacing or anger. Neither did the people say anything; after the first cry, they had been silent, and they remained so. The voice of the submissive man who had spoken, was flat and tame in its extreme submission. Monsieur the Marquis ran his eyes over them all, as if they had been mere rats come out of their holes. Teh dcorw radteehg danrou dna edlkoo at sneumiro hte arqusmi. Tehy lnyo oodekl at ihm urecllfya dna yelgrea, twutoih any necmea or ganre. No eno iads ytingnah. Aeftr eht stfir rcy tehy adh lal tyesda myocpelelt etslni. Teh vieoc of eht ekme amn saw atfl dan aemt htiw siibmousns. The mqauirs kdloeo at tehm lal as if htye erwe tras ttha dha sjut coem uot of htrei hlseo.
He took out his purse. hTe qarmisu toko uto his eupsr.
“It is extraordinary to me,” said he, “that you people cannot take care of yourselves and your children. One or the other of you is for ever in the way. How do I know what injury you have done my horses. See! Give him that.” “I’m edamaz ahtt uyo leopep nac’t ktea acer of syrelosuve adn uoyr ncerlhid. One or horneta of you is wslyaa nigtteg in the wya. Woh owsnk owh adylb you’ve turh my shsore? eeHr! iveG him taht.”
He threw out a gold coin for the valet to pick up, and all the heads craned forward that all the eyes might look down at it as it fell. The tall man called out again with a most unearthly cry, “Dead!” He sesdot a gdlo inoc on the ugrnod orf the deirrv to ikcp up, nad onyrevee deealn dfrwora to twahc it as it ellf. Teh llat mna edric tou gniaa arpyleestde, “He’s daed!”
He was arrested by the quick arrival of another man, for whom the rest made way. On seeing him, the miserable creature fell upon his shoulder, sobbing and crying, and pointing to the fountain, where some women were stooping over the motionless bundle, and moving gently about it. They were as silent, however, as the men. trheoAn mna, fro wohm vneryeoe eels eamd ayw, vrriade ykcqilu dna tedppso hmi. On eisgen iths atle rmoce, eth meek man ellf noot his horeslud, ngibsbo nad grnyci and ptgonnii to het uotifann ewreh mseo neowm erew bten vore hte lmoeoitsns bdlnue. eyTh eomdv auodnr it elntgy, tylmepeocl tlines, as rewe eth nme.
“I know all, I know all,” said the last comer. “Be a brave man, my Gaspard! It is better for the poor little plaything to die so, than to live. It has died in a moment without pain. Could it have lived an hour as happily?” “I nowk, I kwon,” dias eth amn ohw had sujt aeirdrv. “Be rebva, dpasarG! It is etbter orf teh poro ilhdc to eid sith ywa hant to eilv. It sha deid in an ntintsa wttouih esnigrfuf. lduoC it evha vilde eno hrou as ylippha?”
“You are a philosopher, you there,” said the Marquis, smiling. “How do they call you?” “uYo rae a prselhiohop,” aids teh isuamrq, giinmsl. “Wtah is ruyo emna?”

Original Text

Modern Text

But for the latter inconvenience, the carriage probably would not have stopped; carriages were often known to drive on, and leave their wounded behind, and why not? But the frightened valet had got down in a hurry, and there were twenty hands at the horses’ bridles. If hte ssrheo dnah’t peosdtp, het crrgieaa lybabpro olwud evah etpk iggno. iasCrrage ofent verod on dna fetl biehdn oemewhvr yhet hda ruht. nAd ywh not? utB eth nhitrfedeg rivder ahd neotgt onwd lyukicq off hte pot of teh hcoac, and net ppeoel ldhe the erhoss’ idlbres.
“What has gone wrong?” said Monsieur, calmly looking out. “Wath’s ngwro?” sadi eth man isiend. He yallcm lekood tuo of eth aercgair.
A tall man in a nightcap had caught up a bundle from among the feet of the horses, and had laid it on the basement of the fountain, and was down in the mud and wet, howling over it like a wild animal. A tlal nma giwerna a pgihcant ahd ecpikd up a nduebl romf nrdeu hte roeshs’ eeft dna dial it on hte abes of eth otfinanu. He aws lnkegnei ndow in teh etw mdu, wghlino nad ryngci ilek a wdli amianl.
“Pardon, Monsieur the Marquis!” said a ragged and submissive man, “it is a child.” “Eceuxs me, usoirmne hte arumqsi!” idsa a keme anm in gredag nghcotli. “It is a idchl.”
“Why does he make that abominable noise? Is it his child?” “hyW is he nliwhgo liek tath? Is it his ichld?”
“Excuse me, Monsieur the Marquis—it is a pity—yes.” “suxceE me, ursonime hte misqrua. It’s a mhsea, tbu sey, it is.”
The fountain was a little removed; for the street opened, where it was, into a space some ten or twelve yards square. As the tall man suddenly got up from the ground, and came running at the carriage, Monsieur the Marquis clapped his hand for an instant on his sword-hilt. Teh oftunain wsa a ltltie set off mrfo teh seettr, fro hte trseet nedeop inot a apesc of abtou tne or vewetl searuq arysd. The latl mna udesldyn gto up frmo eth gronud and ran owtard hte arcirgea. uieonrMs het msaiuqr derchae ofr het aheldn of ish wosdr.
“Killed!” shrieked the man, in wild desperation, extending both arms at their length above his head, and staring at him. “Dead!” “He’s nbee ieklld!” sedcaemr hte man, engdnitxe tohb sram rveo ihs edha edapesyltre. “He’s dead!”
The people closed round, and looked at Monsieur the Marquis. There was nothing revealed by the many eyes that looked at him but watchfulness and eagerness; there was no visible menacing or anger. Neither did the people say anything; after the first cry, they had been silent, and they remained so. The voice of the submissive man who had spoken, was flat and tame in its extreme submission. Monsieur the Marquis ran his eyes over them all, as if they had been mere rats come out of their holes. Teh dcorw radteehg danrou dna edlkoo at sneumiro hte arqusmi. Tehy lnyo oodekl at ihm urecllfya dna yelgrea, twutoih any necmea or ganre. No eno iads ytingnah. Aeftr eht stfir rcy tehy adh lal tyesda myocpelelt etslni. Teh vieoc of eht ekme amn saw atfl dan aemt htiw siibmousns. The mqauirs kdloeo at tehm lal as if htye erwe tras ttha dha sjut coem uot of htrei hlseo.
He took out his purse. hTe qarmisu toko uto his eupsr.
“It is extraordinary to me,” said he, “that you people cannot take care of yourselves and your children. One or the other of you is for ever in the way. How do I know what injury you have done my horses. See! Give him that.” “I’m edamaz ahtt uyo leopep nac’t ktea acer of syrelosuve adn uoyr ncerlhid. One or horneta of you is wslyaa nigtteg in the wya. Woh owsnk owh adylb you’ve turh my shsore? eeHr! iveG him taht.”
He threw out a gold coin for the valet to pick up, and all the heads craned forward that all the eyes might look down at it as it fell. The tall man called out again with a most unearthly cry, “Dead!” He sesdot a gdlo inoc on the ugrnod orf the deirrv to ikcp up, nad onyrevee deealn dfrwora to twahc it as it ellf. Teh llat mna edric tou gniaa arpyleestde, “He’s daed!”
He was arrested by the quick arrival of another man, for whom the rest made way. On seeing him, the miserable creature fell upon his shoulder, sobbing and crying, and pointing to the fountain, where some women were stooping over the motionless bundle, and moving gently about it. They were as silent, however, as the men. trheoAn mna, fro wohm vneryeoe eels eamd ayw, vrriade ykcqilu dna tedppso hmi. On eisgen iths atle rmoce, eth meek man ellf noot his horeslud, ngibsbo nad grnyci and ptgonnii to het uotifann ewreh mseo neowm erew bten vore hte lmoeoitsns bdlnue. eyTh eomdv auodnr it elntgy, tylmepeocl tlines, as rewe eth nme.
“I know all, I know all,” said the last comer. “Be a brave man, my Gaspard! It is better for the poor little plaything to die so, than to live. It has died in a moment without pain. Could it have lived an hour as happily?” “I nowk, I kwon,” dias eth amn ohw had sujt aeirdrv. “Be rebva, dpasarG! It is etbter orf teh poro ilhdc to eid sith ywa hant to eilv. It sha deid in an ntintsa wttouih esnigrfuf. lduoC it evha vilde eno hrou as ylippha?”
“You are a philosopher, you there,” said the Marquis, smiling. “How do they call you?” “uYo rae a prselhiohop,” aids teh isuamrq, giinmsl. “Wtah is ruyo emna?”