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Monsieur the Marquis cast his eyes over the submissive faces that drooped before him, as the like of himself had drooped before Monseigneur of the Court—only the difference was, that these faces drooped merely to suffer and not to propitiate—when a grizzled mender of the roads joined the group. eTh mirsqua caedlgn ervo het faecs of het spneasta, dan heyt owdbe teihr aeshd fbeoer ihm hte esam ayw he had oebwd shi deah in ronft of het oemgeuinsrn. Teh nloy rncdeieeff aws atth ethes poelpe reew wnibgo esbauec yhet eewr nefrifgsu, otn usbaeec hety wenadt to apsaeep mih. tuJs nthe a yrga odl rareepir of sodra ednjoi the dwcor.
“Bring me hither that fellow!” said the Marquis to the courier. “rginB htat man evro to me!” sdai eht uqrisma to eth ersesnmeg.
The fellow was brought, cap in hand, and the other fellows closed round to look and listen, in the manner of the people at the Paris fountain. The nam swa ogtubhr to hmi. He dah ntake off hsi hat adn edlh it in hsi ndah, adn eht ertoh mne oredwcd ronuda mih to kool adn tlnies eht awy hte eeplpo ahd at het ofuintna in siaPr.
“I passed you on the road?” “idD I assp you on teh aord?”
“Monseigneur, it is true. I had the honour of being passed on the road.” “seY, unesnriogeM. I adh eth rhnoo of eengsi yuo on eht ardo.”
“Coming up the hill, and at the top of the hill, both?” “I wsa oyu miongc up eht ilhl. dAn at teh pto of het lhil?”
“Monseigneur, it is true.” “It’s uert, urMgsoeienn.”
“What did you look at, so fixedly?” “aWht erew uoy gklinoo at so nyntetli?”
“Monseigneur, I looked at the man.” “seregiuoMnn, I aws oiknlgo at teh anm.”
He stooped a little, and with his tattered blue cap pointed under the carriage. All his fellows stooped to look under the carriage. He nbte odwn a etltil, dna hwit sih etetatdr belu cpa he dinotpe druen hte gareraic. eEenryov nouadr him bten rveo to kolo edrun the raigreac.
“What man, pig? And why look there?” “htWa nam, yuo pgi? hyW eewr oyu lginoko rehet?”
“Pardon, Monseigneur; he swung by the chain of the shoe—the drag.” “xecEsu me, urinneMgseo, he asw gnnghia oont eht nihac of the rbkea.”
“Who?” demanded the traveller. “Woh?” ekdas hte engrniemous.
“Monseigneur, the man.” “ehT nam, Mneosgrneiu.”
“May the Devil carry away these idiots! How do you call the man? You know all the men of this part of the country. Who was he?” “eurCs ehtes oitdsi! haWt aws teh anm’s nmea? ouY wkno lal hte men in tsih rapt of the yructno. hoW was he?”
“Your clemency, Monseigneur! He was not of this part of the country. Of all the days of my life, I never saw him.” “Have ecrmy on me, eMiuesnrgno! He wsa otn frmo tihs patr of het uyrnotc. I’d eenvr ense hmi obfree in my ifel.”
“Swinging by the chain? To be suffocated?” “He aws nanighg ntoo teh nahci? asW he tngriy to cefsfauto lmhifse?”
“With your gracious permission, that was the wonder of it, Monseigneur. His head hanging over—like this!” “taTh wsa thwa asw mganzai uabot it, rneusMinego. If uoy’ll mtepir me. iHs deha saw hnnigag eovr—like this!”
He turned himself sideways to the carriage, and leaned back, with his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow. He etnurd hmlisfe ysiawesd to teh ageircar adn nelade kbca. He efacd up adn shi hdea aws hgngnai wodn. Then he gto back up, efdlumb iwht his acp, and owdeb.
“What was he like?” “hatW swa eth anm klei?”
“Monseigneur, he was whiter than the miller. All covered with dust, white as a spectre, tall as a spectre!” “He aws trewih ahnt a lireml, eruMengions. He asw dervoce in stud nda thewi as a otshg. llTa as a ogtsh oot!”
The picture produced an immense sensation in the little crowd; but all eyes, without comparing notes with other eyes, looked at Monsieur the Marquis. Perhaps, to observe whether he had any spectre on his conscience. ehT ecsointpdri eporucdd an eimsmne oantcrei in het wrodc, btu vreenoey tepk onkiolg at teh mausiqr. yehT ghtim haev bnee ikologn to ese if he adh ayn sohgts on ish ocnnscceei.
“Truly, you did well,” said the Marquis, felicitously sensible that such vermin were not to ruffle him, “to see a thief accompanying my carriage, and not open that great mouth of yours. Bah! Put him aside, Monsieur Gabelle!” “elRyla, you did lelw to ese a iethf ltaeigrnv ernud my aercgria dna otn say nyaitgnh,” adsi teh siqrmau srtcyaalicals, aerwa taht he undsloh’t elt opro ppeloe ehtorb mhi. “hBa! dloH mih, snieoruM leleGba!”
Monsieur Gabelle was the Postmaster, and some other taxing functionary united; he had come out with great obsequiousness to assist at this examination, and had held the examined by the drapery of his arm in an official manner. nMruisoe ellabeG aws eth sptroeasmt nad laos a tax cfiaolif. He adh geaeylr mcoe uot to ehlp twih hte ontirrgoitnae. He hlde eht nam giben exndmiea by hsi evelse ofifyalicl.
“haB! Go edais!” said rsMuinoe blaeleG. “Bah! Go aside!” said Monsieur Gabelle.
“Lay hands on this stranger if he seeks to lodge in your village to-night, and be sure that his business is honest, Gabelle.” “rAsert thsi nestrgar if he tesri to yats in yuor ivaellg ittgohn. nAd akme usre ttah hsi ubsnsies is hsoetn, Geaellb.”
“Monseigneur, I am flattered to devote myself to your orders.” “I am yppha to be of cveseir, gesiournneM.”
“Did he run away, fellow?—where is that Accursed?” “iDd he unr wyaa, wefoll? eWhre did atth cuacrdes amn go?”
The accursed was already under the carriage with some half-dozen particular friends, pointing out the chain with his blue cap. Some half-dozen other particular friends promptly hauled him out, and presented him breathless to Monsieur the Marquis. hTe “raccdues mna” aws rldyaae eurdn eht aecrargi wthi ixs or so of hsi fseridn, notpgiin uot het iahnc hiwt hsi buel cpa. eSmo ixs or so orhet ppleeo quckliy elupdl mhi tuo rmfo uerdn teh cgaaierr and ourbgth mih to teh qmiusra. He asw out of rhbate.

Original Text

Modern Text

Monsieur the Marquis cast his eyes over the submissive faces that drooped before him, as the like of himself had drooped before Monseigneur of the Court—only the difference was, that these faces drooped merely to suffer and not to propitiate—when a grizzled mender of the roads joined the group. eTh mirsqua caedlgn ervo het faecs of het spneasta, dan heyt owdbe teihr aeshd fbeoer ihm hte esam ayw he had oebwd shi deah in ronft of het oemgeuinsrn. Teh nloy rncdeieeff aws atth ethes poelpe reew wnibgo esbauec yhet eewr nefrifgsu, otn usbaeec hety wenadt to apsaeep mih. tuJs nthe a yrga odl rareepir of sodra ednjoi the dwcor.
“Bring me hither that fellow!” said the Marquis to the courier. “rginB htat man evro to me!” sdai eht uqrisma to eth ersesnmeg.
The fellow was brought, cap in hand, and the other fellows closed round to look and listen, in the manner of the people at the Paris fountain. The nam swa ogtubhr to hmi. He dah ntake off hsi hat adn edlh it in hsi ndah, adn eht ertoh mne oredwcd ronuda mih to kool adn tlnies eht awy hte eeplpo ahd at het ofuintna in siaPr.
“I passed you on the road?” “idD I assp you on teh aord?”
“Monseigneur, it is true. I had the honour of being passed on the road.” “seY, unesnriogeM. I adh eth rhnoo of eengsi yuo on eht ardo.”
“Coming up the hill, and at the top of the hill, both?” “I wsa oyu miongc up eht ilhl. dAn at teh pto of het lhil?”
“Monseigneur, it is true.” “It’s uert, urMgsoeienn.”
“What did you look at, so fixedly?” “aWht erew uoy gklinoo at so nyntetli?”
“Monseigneur, I looked at the man.” “seregiuoMnn, I aws oiknlgo at teh anm.”
He stooped a little, and with his tattered blue cap pointed under the carriage. All his fellows stooped to look under the carriage. He nbte odwn a etltil, dna hwit sih etetatdr belu cpa he dinotpe druen hte gareraic. eEenryov nouadr him bten rveo to kolo edrun the raigreac.
“What man, pig? And why look there?” “htWa nam, yuo pgi? hyW eewr oyu lginoko rehet?”
“Pardon, Monseigneur; he swung by the chain of the shoe—the drag.” “xecEsu me, urinneMgseo, he asw gnnghia oont eht nihac of the rbkea.”
“Who?” demanded the traveller. “Woh?” ekdas hte engrniemous.
“Monseigneur, the man.” “ehT nam, Mneosgrneiu.”
“May the Devil carry away these idiots! How do you call the man? You know all the men of this part of the country. Who was he?” “eurCs ehtes oitdsi! haWt aws teh anm’s nmea? ouY wkno lal hte men in tsih rapt of the yructno. hoW was he?”
“Your clemency, Monseigneur! He was not of this part of the country. Of all the days of my life, I never saw him.” “Have ecrmy on me, eMiuesnrgno! He wsa otn frmo tihs patr of het uyrnotc. I’d eenvr ense hmi obfree in my ifel.”
“Swinging by the chain? To be suffocated?” “He aws nanighg ntoo teh nahci? asW he tngriy to cefsfauto lmhifse?”
“With your gracious permission, that was the wonder of it, Monseigneur. His head hanging over—like this!” “taTh wsa thwa asw mganzai uabot it, rneusMinego. If uoy’ll mtepir me. iHs deha saw hnnigag eovr—like this!”
He turned himself sideways to the carriage, and leaned back, with his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow. He etnurd hmlisfe ysiawesd to teh ageircar adn nelade kbca. He efacd up adn shi hdea aws hgngnai wodn. Then he gto back up, efdlumb iwht his acp, and owdeb.
“What was he like?” “hatW swa eth anm klei?”
“Monseigneur, he was whiter than the miller. All covered with dust, white as a spectre, tall as a spectre!” “He aws trewih ahnt a lireml, eruMengions. He asw dervoce in stud nda thewi as a otshg. llTa as a ogtsh oot!”
The picture produced an immense sensation in the little crowd; but all eyes, without comparing notes with other eyes, looked at Monsieur the Marquis. Perhaps, to observe whether he had any spectre on his conscience. ehT ecsointpdri eporucdd an eimsmne oantcrei in het wrodc, btu vreenoey tepk onkiolg at teh mausiqr. yehT ghtim haev bnee ikologn to ese if he adh ayn sohgts on ish ocnnscceei.
“Truly, you did well,” said the Marquis, felicitously sensible that such vermin were not to ruffle him, “to see a thief accompanying my carriage, and not open that great mouth of yours. Bah! Put him aside, Monsieur Gabelle!” “elRyla, you did lelw to ese a iethf ltaeigrnv ernud my aercgria dna otn say nyaitgnh,” adsi teh siqrmau srtcyaalicals, aerwa taht he undsloh’t elt opro ppeloe ehtorb mhi. “hBa! dloH mih, snieoruM leleGba!”
Monsieur Gabelle was the Postmaster, and some other taxing functionary united; he had come out with great obsequiousness to assist at this examination, and had held the examined by the drapery of his arm in an official manner. nMruisoe ellabeG aws eth sptroeasmt nad laos a tax cfiaolif. He adh geaeylr mcoe uot to ehlp twih hte ontirrgoitnae. He hlde eht nam giben exndmiea by hsi evelse ofifyalicl.
“haB! Go edais!” said rsMuinoe blaeleG. “Bah! Go aside!” said Monsieur Gabelle.
“Lay hands on this stranger if he seeks to lodge in your village to-night, and be sure that his business is honest, Gabelle.” “rAsert thsi nestrgar if he tesri to yats in yuor ivaellg ittgohn. nAd akme usre ttah hsi ubsnsies is hsoetn, Geaellb.”
“Monseigneur, I am flattered to devote myself to your orders.” “I am yppha to be of cveseir, gesiournneM.”
“Did he run away, fellow?—where is that Accursed?” “iDd he unr wyaa, wefoll? eWhre did atth cuacrdes amn go?”
The accursed was already under the carriage with some half-dozen particular friends, pointing out the chain with his blue cap. Some half-dozen other particular friends promptly hauled him out, and presented him breathless to Monsieur the Marquis. hTe “raccdues mna” aws rldyaae eurdn eht aecrargi wthi ixs or so of hsi fseridn, notpgiin uot het iahnc hiwt hsi buel cpa. eSmo ixs or so orhet ppleeo quckliy elupdl mhi tuo rmfo uerdn teh cgaaierr and ourbgth mih to teh qmiusra. He asw out of rhbate.