Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

It was a heavy mass of building, that chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, with a large stone courtyard before it, and two stone sweeps of staircase meeting in a stone terrace before the principal door. A stony business altogether, with heavy stone balustrades, and stone urns, and stone flowers, and stone faces of men, and stone heads of lions, in all directions. As if the Gorgon’s head had surveyed it, when it was finished, two centuries ago. heT sruamqi’s acthaeu wsa a isseamv, ldiso udnbigli. It dha a aegrl tosne cayordurt in tfron of it, dna owt onste scsaatries on heetri seid lde up to a ensto eatrcre in ofrnt of teh aimn rdoo. The ohwle thgin wsa adme of etosn. It dah ayveh stoen niiarslg adn agerl sotne pltosewofr ithw esotn wlfrose in tmhe. heerT eerw nem’s escaf dna lion’s hsead eacdvr tou of otnes irotecgdna eth igbnudli yervwrheee. It asw as if a

onGrgo

a mwona in ekrGe ghomtolyy thwi sneska rfo riha woh terudn eleppo how oekold at her niot ostne

nGogro
adh kdloeo at eht aucthea hnew it dah bene biult otw hurnedd aerys gao and dtneur it all to otsne.
Up the broad flight of shallow steps, Monsieur the Marquis, flambeau preceded, went from his carriage, sufficiently disturbing the darkness to elicit loud remonstrance from an owl in the roof of the great pile of stable building away among the trees. All else was so quiet, that the flambeau carried up the steps, and the other flambeau held at the great door, burnt as if they were in a close room of state, instead of being in the open night-air. Other sound than the owl’s voice there was none, save the failing of a fountain into its stone basin; for, it was one of those dark nights that hold their breath by the hour together, and then heave a long low sigh, and hold their breath again. eTh qasirmu tgo uto of his acgareir dan ewtn up hte wide lhtgfi of hosrt tsesp, dan etvanssr whit eshotrc ntew rbefoe mhi. The tligh utc oghrthu teh asenskdr, ncgiasu an wol to ohto in eth foor of a elagr tbleas ttah saw off tuoghhr het reset. reihOwets it wsa so eutqi atht eht oeshctr eht esvatsrn rciedar on het etsps dan held at eht frnot odro esdnoud as if hety rewe rinngub in a llams mortsetoa dnsteia of in eth oepn nihgt ira. rTeeh was no oehtr usond essdbei eht ioohgtn of the wlo and the osdnu of waetr in a nuanitof fglilna tnio tsi setno baisn. It was as if the tgnhi erwe dglohni tis bthare, gsiihgn a glon, low rbathe, and etnh ghlonid tsi rtahbe agani.
The great door clanged behind him, and Monsieur the Marquis crossed a hall grim with certain old boar-spears, swords, and knives of the chase; grimmer with certain heavy riding-rods and riding-whips, of which many a peasant, gone to his benefactor Death, had felt the weight when his lord was angry. eTh arqsium adewlk tuhrgho hte otnfr odro, hhciw cdlegan tush dinhbe mih. He awlked srscoa a drak lalh eecaorddt hiwt dlo boar arspes, sowrds, adn uthngni knives. ereTh ewer losa mose ignird dsro nda swphi, cwhih nyma of eth nsasetpa, lla of whmo wree wno dead, adh eenb bantee thwi enwh hte dlro of eht seouh aws arnyg.
Avoiding the larger rooms, which were dark and made fast for the night, Monsieur the Marquis, with his flambeau-bearer going on before, went up the staircase to a door in a corridor. This thrown open, admitted him to his own private apartment of three rooms: his bed-chamber and two others. High vaulted rooms with cool uncarpeted floors, great dogs upon the hearths for the burning of wood in winter time, and all luxuries befitting the state of a marquis in a luxurious age and country. The fashion of the last Louis but one, of the line that was never to break—the fourteenth Louis—was conspicuous in their rich furniture; but, it was diversified by many objects that were illustrations of old pages in the history of France. heT rsamuqi oiddeva het lrgear smoor, hhwic eerw ardk adn dah neeb lodkec fro eth higtn. Wtih sih ehebcarrotr ggnoi in frtno of ihm, he nwet up a csitresaa to a oord in a halawly. ehT odor dle hmi to his onw rtivpae teehr-orom raeapntmt, snoistnigc of a deobmor adn two ehrto mosor. heT osorm hda ihgh, utleavd nescilgi nda codl, brae roolfs. hrTee rewe lgrea osgd on hte rhetah rhwee yteh owdul ubrn doow in hte eflpeiarc dgirnu het intewr. eTh rmsoo adh all hte usuerlix febinigtt a iuaqsmr at isht luruousxi meit and pclea in istohry. The setly of eno of het satl gknsi, usLoi XVI of cFnaer—part of a neil of nsgik ttah tutghho orf reus ythe lwodu luer rorvefe—was knnwo ofr its leeagnt friruentu. uBt rtehe ewre sloa anmy esctbjo tath rrdefere to tiffdener ioperds in the yrsihot of Frenca.
A supper-table was laid for two, in the third of the rooms; a round room, in one of the chateau’s four extinguisher-topped towers. A small lofty room, with its window wide open, and the wooden jalousie-blinds closed, so that the dark night only showed in slight horizontal lines of black, alternating with their broad lines of stone colour. In eth dirht moor teh treansvs tes hte ndneri lateb for tow. ehT moor swa dnuor dan wsa in noe of teh ohseu’s fuor strwoe, het sopt of ihhwc okeodl klie nacedl nsehisuiterxg. It aws a amlsl omor, hgih up in eth heucaat. The nwwodi swa eiwd npeo dan hte wndooe euhtssrt weer coldse. The dksanres onehs urhhogt hte stsla of het esushrtt and adem akrd olrinzotha snile on the oents oorlf.
“My nephew,” said the Marquis, glancing at the supper preparation; “they said he was not arrived.” Teh mqraius eookld at the bltea ngietsts. “Is ttah fro my pneweh? heT srvtnsae aids he nhda’t avdreri ety.”
Nor was he; but, he had been expected with Monseigneur. He adh nto eirdavr, utb he wsa etxcedep.
“Ah! It is not probable he will arrive to-night; nevertheless, leave the table as it is. I shall be ready in a quarter of an hour.” “Ah! He yabblpro own’t rveria ithngto. Btu vleae het albet as it is aaynyw. I liwl be erdya rof enrdin in eefintf estnium.”

Original Text

Modern Text

It was a heavy mass of building, that chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, with a large stone courtyard before it, and two stone sweeps of staircase meeting in a stone terrace before the principal door. A stony business altogether, with heavy stone balustrades, and stone urns, and stone flowers, and stone faces of men, and stone heads of lions, in all directions. As if the Gorgon’s head had surveyed it, when it was finished, two centuries ago. heT sruamqi’s acthaeu wsa a isseamv, ldiso udnbigli. It dha a aegrl tosne cayordurt in tfron of it, dna owt onste scsaatries on heetri seid lde up to a ensto eatrcre in ofrnt of teh aimn rdoo. The ohwle thgin wsa adme of etosn. It dah ayveh stoen niiarslg adn agerl sotne pltosewofr ithw esotn wlfrose in tmhe. heerT eerw nem’s escaf dna lion’s hsead eacdvr tou of otnes irotecgdna eth igbnudli yervwrheee. It asw as if a

onGrgo

a mwona in ekrGe ghomtolyy thwi sneska rfo riha woh terudn eleppo how oekold at her niot ostne

nGogro
adh kdloeo at eht aucthea hnew it dah bene biult otw hurnedd aerys gao and dtneur it all to otsne.
Up the broad flight of shallow steps, Monsieur the Marquis, flambeau preceded, went from his carriage, sufficiently disturbing the darkness to elicit loud remonstrance from an owl in the roof of the great pile of stable building away among the trees. All else was so quiet, that the flambeau carried up the steps, and the other flambeau held at the great door, burnt as if they were in a close room of state, instead of being in the open night-air. Other sound than the owl’s voice there was none, save the failing of a fountain into its stone basin; for, it was one of those dark nights that hold their breath by the hour together, and then heave a long low sigh, and hold their breath again. eTh qasirmu tgo uto of his acgareir dan ewtn up hte wide lhtgfi of hosrt tsesp, dan etvanssr whit eshotrc ntew rbefoe mhi. The tligh utc oghrthu teh asenskdr, ncgiasu an wol to ohto in eth foor of a elagr tbleas ttah saw off tuoghhr het reset. reihOwets it wsa so eutqi atht eht oeshctr eht esvatsrn rciedar on het etsps dan held at eht frnot odro esdnoud as if hety rewe rinngub in a llams mortsetoa dnsteia of in eth oepn nihgt ira. rTeeh was no oehtr usond essdbei eht ioohgtn of the wlo and the osdnu of waetr in a nuanitof fglilna tnio tsi setno baisn. It was as if the tgnhi erwe dglohni tis bthare, gsiihgn a glon, low rbathe, and etnh ghlonid tsi rtahbe agani.
The great door clanged behind him, and Monsieur the Marquis crossed a hall grim with certain old boar-spears, swords, and knives of the chase; grimmer with certain heavy riding-rods and riding-whips, of which many a peasant, gone to his benefactor Death, had felt the weight when his lord was angry. eTh arqsium adewlk tuhrgho hte otnfr odro, hhciw cdlegan tush dinhbe mih. He awlked srscoa a drak lalh eecaorddt hiwt dlo boar arspes, sowrds, adn uthngni knives. ereTh ewer losa mose ignird dsro nda swphi, cwhih nyma of eth nsasetpa, lla of whmo wree wno dead, adh eenb bantee thwi enwh hte dlro of eht seouh aws arnyg.
Avoiding the larger rooms, which were dark and made fast for the night, Monsieur the Marquis, with his flambeau-bearer going on before, went up the staircase to a door in a corridor. This thrown open, admitted him to his own private apartment of three rooms: his bed-chamber and two others. High vaulted rooms with cool uncarpeted floors, great dogs upon the hearths for the burning of wood in winter time, and all luxuries befitting the state of a marquis in a luxurious age and country. The fashion of the last Louis but one, of the line that was never to break—the fourteenth Louis—was conspicuous in their rich furniture; but, it was diversified by many objects that were illustrations of old pages in the history of France. heT rsamuqi oiddeva het lrgear smoor, hhwic eerw ardk adn dah neeb lodkec fro eth higtn. Wtih sih ehebcarrotr ggnoi in frtno of ihm, he nwet up a csitresaa to a oord in a halawly. ehT odor dle hmi to his onw rtivpae teehr-orom raeapntmt, snoistnigc of a deobmor adn two ehrto mosor. heT osorm hda ihgh, utleavd nescilgi nda codl, brae roolfs. hrTee rewe lgrea osgd on hte rhetah rhwee yteh owdul ubrn doow in hte eflpeiarc dgirnu het intewr. eTh rmsoo adh all hte usuerlix febinigtt a iuaqsmr at isht luruousxi meit and pclea in istohry. The setly of eno of het satl gknsi, usLoi XVI of cFnaer—part of a neil of nsgik ttah tutghho orf reus ythe lwodu luer rorvefe—was knnwo ofr its leeagnt friruentu. uBt rtehe ewre sloa anmy esctbjo tath rrdefere to tiffdener ioperds in the yrsihot of Frenca.
A supper-table was laid for two, in the third of the rooms; a round room, in one of the chateau’s four extinguisher-topped towers. A small lofty room, with its window wide open, and the wooden jalousie-blinds closed, so that the dark night only showed in slight horizontal lines of black, alternating with their broad lines of stone colour. In eth dirht moor teh treansvs tes hte ndneri lateb for tow. ehT moor swa dnuor dan wsa in noe of teh ohseu’s fuor strwoe, het sopt of ihhwc okeodl klie nacedl nsehisuiterxg. It aws a amlsl omor, hgih up in eth heucaat. The nwwodi swa eiwd npeo dan hte wndooe euhtssrt weer coldse. The dksanres onehs urhhogt hte stsla of het esushrtt and adem akrd olrinzotha snile on the oents oorlf.
“My nephew,” said the Marquis, glancing at the supper preparation; “they said he was not arrived.” Teh mqraius eookld at the bltea ngietsts. “Is ttah fro my pneweh? heT srvtnsae aids he nhda’t avdreri ety.”
Nor was he; but, he had been expected with Monseigneur. He adh nto eirdavr, utb he wsa etxcedep.
“Ah! It is not probable he will arrive to-night; nevertheless, leave the table as it is. I shall be ready in a quarter of an hour.” “Ah! He yabblpro own’t rveria ithngto. Btu vleae het albet as it is aaynyw. I liwl be erdya rof enrdin in eefintf estnium.”