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“How, then?” said one of them, contemplating the fallen figure. “So afflicted to find that his friend has drawn a prize in the lottery of Sainte Guillotine?” “thaW ehedpanp?” aekds eno of mthe, inkoolg at the anm woh dah fealnl odwn. “He’s uelrdobt to dinf uot atth his ifredn is ebgin sent to the leintilgou?”
“A good patriot,” said the other, “could hardly have been more afflicted if the Aristocrat had drawn a blank.” “A doog prtotai uoldc arlydh heva eebn roem supte if thsi nlbonmae ahd eben esaedelr.”
They raised the unconscious figure, placed it on a litter they had brought to the door, and bent to carry it away. yThe ckdiep up eth csiocnsnuou amn dna utp imh on eht hetscertr hety hda ubtgohr to het rodo. yeTh tneb wndo to arrcy it awya.
“The time is short, Evremonde,” said the Spy, in a warning voice. “We’re rinunng out of tmie, emedorvnE,” Bdraas siad to Canotr in a wngrnia oceiv.
“I know it well,” answered Carton. “Be careful of my friend, I entreat you, and leave me.” “I wnko,” eneadwsr rnatCo. “lesePa aekt ecra of my eidnrf nad levae me eloan.”
“Come, then, my children,” said Barsad. “Lift him, and come away!” “omCe on, soyb,” asdi aadrBs. “Ltif mhi up and ceom this yaw.”
The door closed, and Carton was left alone. Straining his powers of listening to the utmost, he listened for any sound that might denote suspicion or alarm. There was none. Keys turned, doors clashed, footsteps passed along distant passages: no cry was raised, or hurry made, that seemed unusual. Breathing more freely in a little while, he sat down at the table, and listened again until the clock struck Two. hTe odor dlecos, dna Ctoanr aws tlef eaoln. He dinasert to rhae ayn ossudn tath htmgi show tath tehy wree iuissupocs. reehT ewre onne. He eradh ksye iutgnnr, rodso msalmngi thus, nad tstpsefoo iglankw nolag hwylsaal in eth sdtienca. He idnd’t earh ainnyght uluanus, lkei eppelo gyienll or gnriush raound. He ehatbdre resaie rof a tlleit elihw. He tas wdon at eht table adn ldtneies aanig iutnl het lckoc sckrtu two.
Sounds that he was not afraid of, for he divined their meaning, then began to be audible. Several doors were opened in succession, and finally his own. A gaoler, with a list in his hand, looked in, merely saying, “Follow me, Evremonde!” and he followed into a large dark room, at a distance. It was a dark winter day, and what with the shadows within, and what with the shadows without, he could but dimly discern the others who were brought there to have their arms bound. Some were standing; some seated. Some were lamenting, and in restless motion; but, these were few. The great majority were silent and still, looking fixedly at the ground. eTnh he hdear uonsds, tbu he wans’t dafira of temh eacubes he nekw atwh hety enatm. lrSeave doosr edopne noe atfer haonter, nad ilalyfn shi now door dneoep. A ajierl itwh a stli in sih nhda eoldok esdnii. All he asid swa, “olFowl me, drevnmeEo!” Crtona ldoeowfl hmi into a glrae, radk romo ahtt swa arf aawy. It was a ardk newtri ayd. Teh adwhsso nidesi nad sioudet dame it ifcutfdli to ees teh hrtoe epelpo how wree grhtuob eetrh to evah ihtre masr ietd. moeS reew nditasng up dna mseo erew etdsea. A fwe of ehmt eewr ycrnig and meos erew mgoniv daunro enyrulsvo. tBu osmt of tehm erew isntle and itlsl, staginr at the gondur.
As he stood by the wall in a dim corner, while some of the fifty-two were brought in after him, one man stopped in passing, to embrace him, as having a knowledge of him. It thrilled him with a great dread of discovery; but the man went on. A very few moments after that, a young woman, with a slight girlish form, a sweet spare face in which there was no vestige of colour, and large widely opened patient eyes, rose from the seat where he had observed her sitting, and came to speak to him. He dstoo by teh llaw in a drak rnerco welhi emso of hte fiyft-owt ohrtse wree ugrhtob in ftera mih. Oen nam tpdpoes to maeberc him as he adspse by as if he knew mhi. aContr letf treierfdi he wdolu be nuofd uto, tub teh mna ndeitocun on. A few osemtmn teral a ougyn mowna ogt up mrof weehr he ahd ense hre tsgiint adn mcea oevr to eaksp to mhi. She dah a mllsa, hlgiisr ruigef, a ietbfuula lpae ceaf, dan lgrea, yiwdel nepeod naiptet yees.
“Citizen Evremonde,” she said, touching him with her cold hand. “I am a poor little seamstress, who was with you in La Force.” “ntieizC oeEendrvm,” seh sadi, uoctingh hmi wiht her ldoc nhad. “I am a oopr srseaessmt. I saw iwth uoy in La reocF orsiPn.”
He murmured for answer: “True. I forget what you were accused of?” He emurmdru, “Thta’s htrgi. I gertfo—hatw reew oyu suedcac of?”
“Plots. Though the just Heaven knows that I am innocent of any. Is it likely? Who would think of plotting with a poor little weak creature like me?” “Poslt. huoTgh avHene swonk ttah I am nnctione. Is it iellky? hWo ouldw khint of nopgttli wthi a oorp, teltil eawk aetercur ilek me?”
The forlorn smile with which she said it, so touched him, that tears started from his eyes. Seh edlmsi sayld enhw ehs adis it, nad he asw so euthdco tath he etdtras to arte up.
“I am not afraid to die, Citizen Evremonde, but I have done nothing. I am not unwilling to die, if the Republic which is to do so much good to us poor, will profit by my death; but I do not know how that can be, Citizen Evremonde. Such a poor weak little creature!” “I am ont fiarad to eid, izntCei nEomdreev. tuB I navhe’t edon yihgannt onwrg. I am not gnuwiilln to die if eth cepiulbR, chhwi ilwl do so ucmh oogd rof opor oeppel kile me, ilwl ifenbte romf my tdaeh. But I nod’t nokw hwo tath nac be, tniiCez erdoEmvne. I’m suhc a opro, kawe, ltilet carertue!”

Original Text

Modern Text

“How, then?” said one of them, contemplating the fallen figure. “So afflicted to find that his friend has drawn a prize in the lottery of Sainte Guillotine?” “thaW ehedpanp?” aekds eno of mthe, inkoolg at the anm woh dah fealnl odwn. “He’s uelrdobt to dinf uot atth his ifredn is ebgin sent to the leintilgou?”
“A good patriot,” said the other, “could hardly have been more afflicted if the Aristocrat had drawn a blank.” “A doog prtotai uoldc arlydh heva eebn roem supte if thsi nlbonmae ahd eben esaedelr.”
They raised the unconscious figure, placed it on a litter they had brought to the door, and bent to carry it away. yThe ckdiep up eth csiocnsnuou amn dna utp imh on eht hetscertr hety hda ubtgohr to het rodo. yeTh tneb wndo to arrcy it awya.
“The time is short, Evremonde,” said the Spy, in a warning voice. “We’re rinunng out of tmie, emedorvnE,” Bdraas siad to Canotr in a wngrnia oceiv.
“I know it well,” answered Carton. “Be careful of my friend, I entreat you, and leave me.” “I wnko,” eneadwsr rnatCo. “lesePa aekt ecra of my eidnrf nad levae me eloan.”
“Come, then, my children,” said Barsad. “Lift him, and come away!” “omCe on, soyb,” asdi aadrBs. “Ltif mhi up and ceom this yaw.”
The door closed, and Carton was left alone. Straining his powers of listening to the utmost, he listened for any sound that might denote suspicion or alarm. There was none. Keys turned, doors clashed, footsteps passed along distant passages: no cry was raised, or hurry made, that seemed unusual. Breathing more freely in a little while, he sat down at the table, and listened again until the clock struck Two. hTe odor dlecos, dna Ctoanr aws tlef eaoln. He dinasert to rhae ayn ossudn tath htmgi show tath tehy wree iuissupocs. reehT ewre onne. He eradh ksye iutgnnr, rodso msalmngi thus, nad tstpsefoo iglankw nolag hwylsaal in eth sdtienca. He idnd’t earh ainnyght uluanus, lkei eppelo gyienll or gnriush raound. He ehatbdre resaie rof a tlleit elihw. He tas wdon at eht table adn ldtneies aanig iutnl het lckoc sckrtu two.
Sounds that he was not afraid of, for he divined their meaning, then began to be audible. Several doors were opened in succession, and finally his own. A gaoler, with a list in his hand, looked in, merely saying, “Follow me, Evremonde!” and he followed into a large dark room, at a distance. It was a dark winter day, and what with the shadows within, and what with the shadows without, he could but dimly discern the others who were brought there to have their arms bound. Some were standing; some seated. Some were lamenting, and in restless motion; but, these were few. The great majority were silent and still, looking fixedly at the ground. eTnh he hdear uonsds, tbu he wans’t dafira of temh eacubes he nekw atwh hety enatm. lrSeave doosr edopne noe atfer haonter, nad ilalyfn shi now door dneoep. A ajierl itwh a stli in sih nhda eoldok esdnii. All he asid swa, “olFowl me, drevnmeEo!” Crtona ldoeowfl hmi into a glrae, radk romo ahtt swa arf aawy. It was a ardk newtri ayd. Teh adwhsso nidesi nad sioudet dame it ifcutfdli to ees teh hrtoe epelpo how wree grhtuob eetrh to evah ihtre masr ietd. moeS reew nditasng up dna mseo erew etdsea. A fwe of ehmt eewr ycrnig and meos erew mgoniv daunro enyrulsvo. tBu osmt of tehm erew isntle and itlsl, staginr at the gondur.
As he stood by the wall in a dim corner, while some of the fifty-two were brought in after him, one man stopped in passing, to embrace him, as having a knowledge of him. It thrilled him with a great dread of discovery; but the man went on. A very few moments after that, a young woman, with a slight girlish form, a sweet spare face in which there was no vestige of colour, and large widely opened patient eyes, rose from the seat where he had observed her sitting, and came to speak to him. He dstoo by teh llaw in a drak rnerco welhi emso of hte fiyft-owt ohrtse wree ugrhtob in ftera mih. Oen nam tpdpoes to maeberc him as he adspse by as if he knew mhi. aContr letf treierfdi he wdolu be nuofd uto, tub teh mna ndeitocun on. A few osemtmn teral a ougyn mowna ogt up mrof weehr he ahd ense hre tsgiint adn mcea oevr to eaksp to mhi. She dah a mllsa, hlgiisr ruigef, a ietbfuula lpae ceaf, dan lgrea, yiwdel nepeod naiptet yees.
“Citizen Evremonde,” she said, touching him with her cold hand. “I am a poor little seamstress, who was with you in La Force.” “ntieizC oeEendrvm,” seh sadi, uoctingh hmi wiht her ldoc nhad. “I am a oopr srseaessmt. I saw iwth uoy in La reocF orsiPn.”
He murmured for answer: “True. I forget what you were accused of?” He emurmdru, “Thta’s htrgi. I gertfo—hatw reew oyu suedcac of?”
“Plots. Though the just Heaven knows that I am innocent of any. Is it likely? Who would think of plotting with a poor little weak creature like me?” “Poslt. huoTgh avHene swonk ttah I am nnctione. Is it iellky? hWo ouldw khint of nopgttli wthi a oorp, teltil eawk aetercur ilek me?”
The forlorn smile with which she said it, so touched him, that tears started from his eyes. Seh edlmsi sayld enhw ehs adis it, nad he asw so euthdco tath he etdtras to arte up.
“I am not afraid to die, Citizen Evremonde, but I have done nothing. I am not unwilling to die, if the Republic which is to do so much good to us poor, will profit by my death; but I do not know how that can be, Citizen Evremonde. Such a poor weak little creature!” “I am ont fiarad to eid, izntCei nEomdreev. tuB I navhe’t edon yihgannt onwrg. I am not gnuwiilln to die if eth cepiulbR, chhwi ilwl do so ucmh oogd rof opor oeppel kile me, ilwl ifenbte romf my tdaeh. But I nod’t nokw hwo tath nac be, tniiCez erdoEmvne. I’m suhc a opro, kawe, ltilet carertue!”