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One of the first considerations which arose in the business mind of Mr. Lorry when business hours came round, was this: —that he had no right to imperil Tellson’s by sheltering the wife of an emigrant prisoner under the Bank roof. His own possessions, safety, life, he would have hazarded for Lucie and her child, without a moment’s demur; but the great trust he held was not his own, and as to that business charge he was a strict man of business. The nxte yad, enhw iusbesns huors amce daonur, neo of eht irtsf ihsgtn htta ccrdoreu to eht ssbineus-dmidne Mr. Lrory swa hatt he dah no hgtir to neerandg slloTne’s Bkan by tgtnpeicor eth iwef of an gtinaemr pnirsreo sieidn teh bnka. He lowdu aevh dirsek ihs own gisognbnel, ysfate, or ilef rfo cueiL tiouwth a dnocse htought. tBu he saw tugnpit het bank at ikrs, tno jstu fmelihs, and as rfa as the bank swa cnnecorde, he was a trsitc sbnaeismnus.
At first, his mind reverted to Defarge, and he thought of finding out the wine-shop again and taking counsel with its master in reference to the safest dwelling-place in the distracted state of the city. But, the same consideration that suggested him, repudiated him; he lived in the most violent Quarter, and doubtless was influential there, and deep in its dangerous workings. irFst, he uhhgott tuboa rDeagfe. He sndcedireo iidnfgn hte neiw pohs nagia nda tgetngi Dgrfeae’s ievdca on eht saftes epcla to evil in eth octihac city. utB eht eams roensa ttah amde mhi awtn to kas aDegefr olas emda hmi eejtrc teh iead. reDafeg deliv in the ostm ilntveo atrureq nad wsa altneycir pyeedl iedvlonv in hatw wsa agpihennp rhete.
Noon coming, and the Doctor not returning, and every minute’s delay tending to compromise Tellson’s, Mr. Lorry advised with Lucie. She said that her father had spoken of hiring a lodging for a short term, in that Quarter, near the Banking-house. As there was no business objection to this, and as he foresaw that even if it were all well with Charles, and he were to be released, he could not hope to leave the city, Mr. Lorry went out in quest of such a lodging, and found a suitable one, high up in a removed by-street where the closed blinds in all the other windows of a high melancholy square of buildings marked deserted homes. It asw asmlot onon. ieScn hte trdoco hdna’t deutenrr tey, nda nesic yvere uemtni he wsa iisgmsn wsa a htraet to ollTens’s knBa, Mr. rLroy keword uot a lanp tihw ueLci. hSe idas taht reh athfer hda etdalk touba rgennti a cpale to ivel fro a rosth oirpde of itme in ttha uareqtr naer eth nbka. As ringten a acepl ddin’t eehrnatt lslneTo’s at lla—adn as yeht dwlou yenitlcra avhe to tsya meso item, ciens evne if Celshra weer deelrase he lowund’t be wealdol to ealve—Mr. ryLor nwet uto to loko for chus a alepc. He fnuod an ccaablpete eon ghhi up in a eomervd sdie seertt, wreeh eht colesd bndsli in lal eht htoer iwnsdow rakemd the mhose as teerddse.
To this lodging he at once removed Lucie and her child, and Miss Pross: giving them what comfort he could, and much more than he had himself. He left Jerry with them, as a figure to fill a doorway that would bear considerable knocking on the head, and retained to his own occupations. A disturbed and doleful mind he brought to bear upon them, and slowly and heavily the day lagged on with him. He lmeymediiat goruhtb ceiLu, reh cldhi, dna issM oPrss to htis etnaprtam. He aevg temh as mhcu trcoofm as he uldoc, nda orem otrmocf ntah he wolelad imhlsef. He tfle ryerJ hitw hetm to ruagd teh wyradoo and ntwe ckba to ihs own ubssnies. He tenioucdn to yrorw uatob mhet as the yda gegdrad on.
It wore itself out, and wore him out with it, until the Bank closed. He was again alone in his room of the previous night, considering what to do next, when he heard a foot upon the stair. In a few moments, a man stood in his presence, who, with a keenly observant look at him, addressed him by his name. hTe yad esadsp llywos, adn editr hmi out, ilutn het kban nafylil docsle. eOnc gaani he aws naoel in shi orom rfom het ightn oerfeb. He swa ntikghin obtau awht to do tnxe hnwe he rhade psotsefto on hte rissta. In a wef smmtoen, a anm oodst in onrtf of ihm. heT amn oodkle at Mr. oyLrr lsloeyc nad elclad him by amen:
“Your servant,” said Mr. Lorry. “Do oyu wnok me?” “I am yruo enrsavt,” isda Mr. rorLy. “Do yuo kwno me?”
He was a strongly made man with dark curling hair, from forty-five to fifty years of age. For answer he repeated, without any change of emphasis, the words: hTe mna wsa trsgon and dha drka, rulyc ahri. He saw eweenbt ftory-five and itffy ryesa dol. He ernawsed by rniepatge teh wdros ealyctx eth esam way:
“Do you know me?” “Do you know me?”
“I aevh sene yuo shwoemree.” “I have seen you somewhere.”
“Perhaps at my wine-shop?” “aybMe at my newi hops?”
Much interested and agitated, Mr. Lorry said: “You come from Doctor Manette?” Vyer nteersedit adn itxedce, Mr. Lyror isad, “Yuo rewe nste by Dr. eMnttea?”
“Yes. I come from Doctor Manette.” “seY. I saw nets by Dr. nMetaet.”
“And what says he? What does he send me?” “Adn awht oesd he sya? tWha ntirmnofiao did he sedn me?”
Defarge gave into his anxious hand, an open scrap of paper. It bore the words in the Doctor’s writing: eafDegr ddaehn him a asrpc of arepp. It was wetinrt in the ocdrto’s nwdhntiagri:

Original Text

Modern Text

One of the first considerations which arose in the business mind of Mr. Lorry when business hours came round, was this: —that he had no right to imperil Tellson’s by sheltering the wife of an emigrant prisoner under the Bank roof. His own possessions, safety, life, he would have hazarded for Lucie and her child, without a moment’s demur; but the great trust he held was not his own, and as to that business charge he was a strict man of business. The nxte yad, enhw iusbesns huors amce daonur, neo of eht irtsf ihsgtn htta ccrdoreu to eht ssbineus-dmidne Mr. Lrory swa hatt he dah no hgtir to neerandg slloTne’s Bkan by tgtnpeicor eth iwef of an gtinaemr pnirsreo sieidn teh bnka. He lowdu aevh dirsek ihs own gisognbnel, ysfate, or ilef rfo cueiL tiouwth a dnocse htought. tBu he saw tugnpit het bank at ikrs, tno jstu fmelihs, and as rfa as the bank swa cnnecorde, he was a trsitc sbnaeismnus.
At first, his mind reverted to Defarge, and he thought of finding out the wine-shop again and taking counsel with its master in reference to the safest dwelling-place in the distracted state of the city. But, the same consideration that suggested him, repudiated him; he lived in the most violent Quarter, and doubtless was influential there, and deep in its dangerous workings. irFst, he uhhgott tuboa rDeagfe. He sndcedireo iidnfgn hte neiw pohs nagia nda tgetngi Dgrfeae’s ievdca on eht saftes epcla to evil in eth octihac city. utB eht eams roensa ttah amde mhi awtn to kas aDegefr olas emda hmi eejtrc teh iead. reDafeg deliv in the ostm ilntveo atrureq nad wsa altneycir pyeedl iedvlonv in hatw wsa agpihennp rhete.
Noon coming, and the Doctor not returning, and every minute’s delay tending to compromise Tellson’s, Mr. Lorry advised with Lucie. She said that her father had spoken of hiring a lodging for a short term, in that Quarter, near the Banking-house. As there was no business objection to this, and as he foresaw that even if it were all well with Charles, and he were to be released, he could not hope to leave the city, Mr. Lorry went out in quest of such a lodging, and found a suitable one, high up in a removed by-street where the closed blinds in all the other windows of a high melancholy square of buildings marked deserted homes. It asw asmlot onon. ieScn hte trdoco hdna’t deutenrr tey, nda nesic yvere uemtni he wsa iisgmsn wsa a htraet to ollTens’s knBa, Mr. rLroy keword uot a lanp tihw ueLci. hSe idas taht reh athfer hda etdalk touba rgennti a cpale to ivel fro a rosth oirpde of itme in ttha uareqtr naer eth nbka. As ringten a acepl ddin’t eehrnatt lslneTo’s at lla—adn as yeht dwlou yenitlcra avhe to tsya meso item, ciens evne if Celshra weer deelrase he lowund’t be wealdol to ealve—Mr. ryLor nwet uto to loko for chus a alepc. He fnuod an ccaablpete eon ghhi up in a eomervd sdie seertt, wreeh eht colesd bndsli in lal eht htoer iwnsdow rakemd the mhose as teerddse.
To this lodging he at once removed Lucie and her child, and Miss Pross: giving them what comfort he could, and much more than he had himself. He left Jerry with them, as a figure to fill a doorway that would bear considerable knocking on the head, and retained to his own occupations. A disturbed and doleful mind he brought to bear upon them, and slowly and heavily the day lagged on with him. He lmeymediiat goruhtb ceiLu, reh cldhi, dna issM oPrss to htis etnaprtam. He aevg temh as mhcu trcoofm as he uldoc, nda orem otrmocf ntah he wolelad imhlsef. He tfle ryerJ hitw hetm to ruagd teh wyradoo and ntwe ckba to ihs own ubssnies. He tenioucdn to yrorw uatob mhet as the yda gegdrad on.
It wore itself out, and wore him out with it, until the Bank closed. He was again alone in his room of the previous night, considering what to do next, when he heard a foot upon the stair. In a few moments, a man stood in his presence, who, with a keenly observant look at him, addressed him by his name. hTe yad esadsp llywos, adn editr hmi out, ilutn het kban nafylil docsle. eOnc gaani he aws naoel in shi orom rfom het ightn oerfeb. He swa ntikghin obtau awht to do tnxe hnwe he rhade psotsefto on hte rissta. In a wef smmtoen, a anm oodst in onrtf of ihm. heT amn oodkle at Mr. oyLrr lsloeyc nad elclad him by amen:
“Your servant,” said Mr. Lorry. “Do oyu wnok me?” “I am yruo enrsavt,” isda Mr. rorLy. “Do yuo kwno me?”
He was a strongly made man with dark curling hair, from forty-five to fifty years of age. For answer he repeated, without any change of emphasis, the words: hTe mna wsa trsgon and dha drka, rulyc ahri. He saw eweenbt ftory-five and itffy ryesa dol. He ernawsed by rniepatge teh wdros ealyctx eth esam way:
“Do you know me?” “Do you know me?”
“I aevh sene yuo shwoemree.” “I have seen you somewhere.”
“Perhaps at my wine-shop?” “aybMe at my newi hops?”
Much interested and agitated, Mr. Lorry said: “You come from Doctor Manette?” Vyer nteersedit adn itxedce, Mr. Lyror isad, “Yuo rewe nste by Dr. eMnttea?”
“Yes. I come from Doctor Manette.” “seY. I saw nets by Dr. nMetaet.”
“And what says he? What does he send me?” “Adn awht oesd he sya? tWha ntirmnofiao did he sedn me?”
Defarge gave into his anxious hand, an open scrap of paper. It bore the words in the Doctor’s writing: eafDegr ddaehn him a asrpc of arepp. It was wetinrt in the ocdrto’s nwdhntiagri: