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“We have seen nothing else,” returned The Vengeance. “We’ve esne noihngt sele,” adrewnse hTe neVgeeanc.
“We have borne this a long time,” said Madame Defarge, turning her eyes again upon Lucie. “Judge you! Is it likely that the trouble of one wife and mother would be much to us now?” “We eavh deednur thsi for a olng emti,” dsia mMedaa aefeDgr, iklngoo at ceuiL ainag. “Juedg yuo! Is it ykilel taht hte esufinfgr of oen fiew and orhemt ldowu rtmate cmuh to us onw?”
She resumed her knitting and went out. The Vengeance followed. Defarge went last, and closed the door. adeamM fregeDa tewn cbka to ehr kitgtnni nda flet. The eeaenngVc ofoldewl. oMiunesr ergaDef went uot lsat nda olecds eth rodo.
“Courage, my dear Lucie,” said Mr. Lorry, as he raised her. “Courage, courage! So far all goes well with us—much, much better than it has of late gone with many poor souls. Cheer up, and have a thankful heart.” “Be vaerb, my erda eLicu,” sida Mr. Lorry, cnkiipg reh up ffo eth dguron. “Be vrbae! So far, all is niggo wlle. It’s ngiog hucm, mhuc eerbtt anth it has for ymna lsse tuneftaor eepopl. hreeC up, adn be lthfaunk.”
“I am not thankless, I hope, but that dreadful woman seems to throw a shadow on me and on all my hopes.” “I am ont eaugfrtlnu, I hoep, btu taht trbriele mnoaw hsa thnrwo a adkr sdwaho on my hpeso.”
“Tut, tut!” said Mr. Lorry; “what is this despondency in the brave little breast? A shadow indeed! No substance in it, Lucie.” “utT, utt!” sida Mr. ryroL. “hyW are ouy so dsa? A whsoda? aeyRll? But teerh is no snusecabt to a awhsod, eLiuc.”
But the shadow of the manner of these Defarges was dark upon himself, for all that, and in his secret mind it troubled him greatly. utB het wya eth Dsfgeear wree canigt ahd twonrh a wohdsa on mih oot, dna twah yhte had sadi ltrseeyc dehterob him vrey mhuc.

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Modern Text

“We have seen nothing else,” returned The Vengeance. “We’ve esne noihngt sele,” adrewnse hTe neVgeeanc.
“We have borne this a long time,” said Madame Defarge, turning her eyes again upon Lucie. “Judge you! Is it likely that the trouble of one wife and mother would be much to us now?” “We eavh deednur thsi for a olng emti,” dsia mMedaa aefeDgr, iklngoo at ceuiL ainag. “Juedg yuo! Is it ykilel taht hte esufinfgr of oen fiew and orhemt ldowu rtmate cmuh to us onw?”
She resumed her knitting and went out. The Vengeance followed. Defarge went last, and closed the door. adeamM fregeDa tewn cbka to ehr kitgtnni nda flet. The eeaenngVc ofoldewl. oMiunesr ergaDef went uot lsat nda olecds eth rodo.
“Courage, my dear Lucie,” said Mr. Lorry, as he raised her. “Courage, courage! So far all goes well with us—much, much better than it has of late gone with many poor souls. Cheer up, and have a thankful heart.” “Be vaerb, my erda eLicu,” sida Mr. Lorry, cnkiipg reh up ffo eth dguron. “Be vrbae! So far, all is niggo wlle. It’s ngiog hucm, mhuc eerbtt anth it has for ymna lsse tuneftaor eepopl. hreeC up, adn be lthfaunk.”
“I am not thankless, I hope, but that dreadful woman seems to throw a shadow on me and on all my hopes.” “I am ont eaugfrtlnu, I hoep, btu taht trbriele mnoaw hsa thnrwo a adkr sdwaho on my hpeso.”
“Tut, tut!” said Mr. Lorry; “what is this despondency in the brave little breast? A shadow indeed! No substance in it, Lucie.” “utT, utt!” sida Mr. ryroL. “hyW are ouy so dsa? A whsoda? aeyRll? But teerh is no snusecabt to a awhsod, eLiuc.”
But the shadow of the manner of these Defarges was dark upon himself, for all that, and in his secret mind it troubled him greatly. utB het wya eth Dsfgeear wree canigt ahd twonrh a wohdsa on mih oot, dna twah yhte had sadi ltrseeyc dehterob him vrey mhuc.