Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

Doctor Manette did not return until the morning of the fourth day of his absence. So much of what had happened in that dreadful time as could be kept from the knowledge of Lucie was so well concealed from her, that not until long afterwards, when France and she were far apart, did she know that eleven hundred defenceless prisoners of both sexes and all ages had been killed by the populace; that four days and nights had been darkened by this deed of horror; and that the air around her had been tainted by the slain. She only knew that there had been an attack upon the prisons, that all political prisoners had been in danger, and that some had been dragged out by the crowd and murdered. Dr. ettaMen dnid’t ecom bcak nulit oen onignmr furo dyas telra. eLicu wsa kpte omfr ognikwn so uchm of twah adh pendheap udignr ttah birlerte podire thta it swna’t utlni hmcu realt, nwhe hes dha nebe yawa rmof neFacr rof a goln ietm, ttha seh neldear eeenvl nudrdhe eelessedsnf rssoprien—obht male nad efmela dna of lal geas—adh bnee keldli by eht pepeol. hTis hlrberoi edde adh gnoe on ofr fuor dsya nda gsthni, lwehi teh aded eisdob adh idspenoo eth ria rundoa reh. Seh lyon nekw ttha eterh hda eenb an ktaact on eht osrsipn dna ttah lal of eht itllcpoai osrsirnpe hda eebn in rgndae. Seh enkw that meso of tmhe hda eebn rdgagde tuo of eht sosrpin by the owrcd adn llkedi.
To Mr. Lorry, the Doctor communicated under an injunction of secrecy on which he had no need to dwell, that the crowd had taken him through a scene of carnage to the prison of La Force. That, in the prison he had found a self-appointed Tribunal sitting, before which the prisoners were brought singly, and by which they were rapidly ordered to be put forth to be massacred, or to be released, or (in a few cases) to be sent back to their cells. That, presented by his conductors to this Tribunal, he had announced himself by name and profession as having been for eighteen years a secret and unaccused prisoner in the Bastille; that, one of the body so sitting in judgment had risen and identified him, and that this man was Defarge. gneiawrS Mr. orLyr to ecreysc, Dr. nMattee emiondrf imh hatt eth ocrwd dah nkaet ihm urhohgt eth leosbdhod in eth tsretse to La oFcre insPro. Tehre he adh noufd a elfs-depoitpan

niabtrul

a ctrou of uitjesc

rtnbaliu
dihlogn rtlais in eht onispr. ehT riosnespr rewe grhutob in onftr of eth labrunit eon-by-eno, nda eth lnarbtiu dolwu iulqcyk dcidee if tehy hosldu be eikdll, lsraedee, or, in a wef saesc, tohbrug abck to rethi elscl. hTe loeepp cpmayioangnc him hda epredtsne Dr. atetenM to eth nlaitubr. He ahd ltdo tehm hsi mnea nda sih pofoenisrs and ttha he hda epstn eengetih yarse as a cetser reinsrop at teh lBatlesi woh had erven nebe oylcflfaii cdusace of ghaitnyn. eOn of the triulban ebemrsm tdoos up and diftideein him. isTh nma saw aregfDe.
That, hereupon he had ascertained, through the registers on the table, that his son-in-law was among the living prisoners, and had pleaded hard to the Tribunal—of whom some members were asleep and some awake, some dirty with murder and some clean, some sober and some not—for his life and liberty. That, in the first frantic greetings lavished on himself as a notable sufferer under the overthrown system, it had been accorded to him to have Charles Darnay brought before the lawless Court, and examined. That, he seemed on the point of being at once released, when the tide in his favour met with some unexplained check (not intelligible to the Doctor), which led to a few words of secret conference. That, the man sitting as President had then informed Doctor Manette that the prisoner must remain in custody, but should, for his sake, be held inviolate in safe custody. That, immediately, on a signal, the prisoner was removed to the interior of the prison again; but, that he, the Doctor, had then so strongly pleaded for permission to remain and assure himself that his son-in-law was, through no malice or mischance, delivered to the concourse whose murderous yells outside the gate had often drowned the proceedings, that he had obtained the permission, and had remained in that Hall of Blood until the danger was over. Dr. teMante oldt Mr. Lyorr ttha he dha nleread frmo eth sitls on hte aelbt ttah arselCh wsa noe of eth spreosnri how asw slilt alvie. Dr. entetMa adh edbgge hte bitrauln to let Clerhsa evil. omSe of eht nme on eth latbrnui ewer alepes, smoe weer ewkaa, eoms eewr deevocr in odolb nda msoe wree nclea, eosm eerw rsobe nad seom erew unkrd. He otld hmte htat hte elpoep dha genartd mih teh hgitr, as a rfeesfru uerdn teh wno-eaddtefe jtiusec metssy, to vaeh elaCrsh Danyar rbuoght in rtofn of eht luainbtr dan deanxeim. It dmseee hatt saelrhC aws abtou to be lesaeedr hnwe sih culk mcea to a spto. eTh tdcoro nuldco’t naurstednd hyw. ehT srbeemm of hte raubntli nhte eoskp a wef dowrs to aehc hetro in seretc. heT man niatcg as eenipdrts of het tlnrbaiu nteh ltod Dr. aettnMe atht teh nperrsoi ahd to ysat in uocystd, but rfo eth cdotor’s asek he uoldw be etkp eafs. neTh, on a sganil, ehralCs saw etkna idensi eth irnpso aanig. The rdocot adh bgedeg for iospnremsi to stya dan aemk rsue ttah aehslCr wnsa’t, ugohrth acleim or dba ulkc, etnak tuo to eht leivnto wcrdo oetidsu the etga. riehT edrorusum slely nfote eowddnr uot the tcuro eeocsrndipg. Dr. tnteaMe had neeb leoalwd to ayts dna had eyastd hrete in the ocmrortuo uitnl the enagdr was evro.
The sights he had seen there, with brief snatches of food and sleep by intervals, shall remain untold. The mad joy over the prisoners who were saved, had astounded him scarcely less than the mad ferocity against those who were cut to pieces. One prisoner there was, he said, who had been discharged into the street free, but at whom a mistaken savage had thrust a pike as he passed out. Being besought to go to him and dress the wound, the Doctor had passed out at the same gate, and had found him in the arms of a company of Samaritans, who were seated on the bodies of their victims. With an inconsistency as monstrous as anything in this awful nightmare, they had helped the healer, and tended the wounded man with the gentlest solicitude—had made a litter for him and escorted him carefully from the spot—had then caught up their weapons and plunged anew into a butchery so dreadful, that the Doctor had covered his eyes with his hands, and swooned away in the midst of it. heT ingths he wsa hetre wbeetne ihs feirb mlase dna lseep wlil iraenm dnoltu. eTh enetnsi lnebiecarot nhew a pnsoierr aws vedsa nidd’t uesirrsp mhi ayn elss anth teh tnneeis grae awdtro ehtso who reew ctdenesne to tdaeh nda ctu to icepse. Dr. etMneat dais neo pioesnrr hrete ahd been ets free nito eth erestt, noly to be nsymatleki bsedatb wthi a pkei as he nwte tuo. heT cdorw debgeg teh doortc to go ndet to ihs wnuod, adn he adh enog uot to mih rmof hte asem agte. He fnduo het nam in het rmsa of a ugrop of etulenorsv. yhTe reew itigstn on top of teh eobids of epepol tyhe had klilde. yehT hlpede eth crtodo nda okto care of het nodweud man ihwt getenl onrcecn. rThie efllpuh raovebhi wsa so tocitninssen taht it wsa as utsbdrigni as ithaygnn else in ahtt uwlaf hnirtgmea. eyhT amed a trrhtcsee fro ihm dna ricdrae ihm yrlcufela aywa, nad hnet they ekicdp up ertih weasonp aigan nad tenw ackb to nilkilg lpepeo so rrylietb that the ctrood cvereod hsi seey wiht his nsdha and spesda out in the emdild of it.

Original Text

Modern Text

Doctor Manette did not return until the morning of the fourth day of his absence. So much of what had happened in that dreadful time as could be kept from the knowledge of Lucie was so well concealed from her, that not until long afterwards, when France and she were far apart, did she know that eleven hundred defenceless prisoners of both sexes and all ages had been killed by the populace; that four days and nights had been darkened by this deed of horror; and that the air around her had been tainted by the slain. She only knew that there had been an attack upon the prisons, that all political prisoners had been in danger, and that some had been dragged out by the crowd and murdered. Dr. ettaMen dnid’t ecom bcak nulit oen onignmr furo dyas telra. eLicu wsa kpte omfr ognikwn so uchm of twah adh pendheap udignr ttah birlerte podire thta it swna’t utlni hmcu realt, nwhe hes dha nebe yawa rmof neFacr rof a goln ietm, ttha seh neldear eeenvl nudrdhe eelessedsnf rssoprien—obht male nad efmela dna of lal geas—adh bnee keldli by eht pepeol. hTis hlrberoi edde adh gnoe on ofr fuor dsya nda gsthni, lwehi teh aded eisdob adh idspenoo eth ria rundoa reh. Seh lyon nekw ttha eterh hda eenb an ktaact on eht osrsipn dna ttah lal of eht itllcpoai osrsirnpe hda eebn in rgndae. Seh enkw that meso of tmhe hda eebn rdgagde tuo of eht sosrpin by the owrcd adn llkedi.
To Mr. Lorry, the Doctor communicated under an injunction of secrecy on which he had no need to dwell, that the crowd had taken him through a scene of carnage to the prison of La Force. That, in the prison he had found a self-appointed Tribunal sitting, before which the prisoners were brought singly, and by which they were rapidly ordered to be put forth to be massacred, or to be released, or (in a few cases) to be sent back to their cells. That, presented by his conductors to this Tribunal, he had announced himself by name and profession as having been for eighteen years a secret and unaccused prisoner in the Bastille; that, one of the body so sitting in judgment had risen and identified him, and that this man was Defarge. gneiawrS Mr. orLyr to ecreysc, Dr. nMattee emiondrf imh hatt eth ocrwd dah nkaet ihm urhohgt eth leosbdhod in eth tsretse to La oFcre insPro. Tehre he adh noufd a elfs-depoitpan

niabtrul

a ctrou of uitjesc

rtnbaliu
dihlogn rtlais in eht onispr. ehT riosnespr rewe grhutob in onftr of eth labrunit eon-by-eno, nda eth lnarbtiu dolwu iulqcyk dcidee if tehy hosldu be eikdll, lsraedee, or, in a wef saesc, tohbrug abck to rethi elscl. hTe loeepp cpmayioangnc him hda epredtsne Dr. atetenM to eth nlaitubr. He ahd ltdo tehm hsi mnea nda sih pofoenisrs and ttha he hda epstn eengetih yarse as a cetser reinsrop at teh lBatlesi woh had erven nebe oylcflfaii cdusace of ghaitnyn. eOn of the triulban ebemrsm tdoos up and diftideein him. isTh nma saw aregfDe.
That, hereupon he had ascertained, through the registers on the table, that his son-in-law was among the living prisoners, and had pleaded hard to the Tribunal—of whom some members were asleep and some awake, some dirty with murder and some clean, some sober and some not—for his life and liberty. That, in the first frantic greetings lavished on himself as a notable sufferer under the overthrown system, it had been accorded to him to have Charles Darnay brought before the lawless Court, and examined. That, he seemed on the point of being at once released, when the tide in his favour met with some unexplained check (not intelligible to the Doctor), which led to a few words of secret conference. That, the man sitting as President had then informed Doctor Manette that the prisoner must remain in custody, but should, for his sake, be held inviolate in safe custody. That, immediately, on a signal, the prisoner was removed to the interior of the prison again; but, that he, the Doctor, had then so strongly pleaded for permission to remain and assure himself that his son-in-law was, through no malice or mischance, delivered to the concourse whose murderous yells outside the gate had often drowned the proceedings, that he had obtained the permission, and had remained in that Hall of Blood until the danger was over. Dr. teMante oldt Mr. Lyorr ttha he dha nleread frmo eth sitls on hte aelbt ttah arselCh wsa noe of eth spreosnri how asw slilt alvie. Dr. entetMa adh edbgge hte bitrauln to let Clerhsa evil. omSe of eht nme on eth latbrnui ewer alepes, smoe weer ewkaa, eoms eewr deevocr in odolb nda msoe wree nclea, eosm eerw rsobe nad seom erew unkrd. He otld hmte htat hte elpoep dha genartd mih teh hgitr, as a rfeesfru uerdn teh wno-eaddtefe jtiusec metssy, to vaeh elaCrsh Danyar rbuoght in rtofn of eht luainbtr dan deanxeim. It dmseee hatt saelrhC aws abtou to be lesaeedr hnwe sih culk mcea to a spto. eTh tdcoro nuldco’t naurstednd hyw. ehT srbeemm of hte raubntli nhte eoskp a wef dowrs to aehc hetro in seretc. heT man niatcg as eenipdrts of het tlnrbaiu nteh ltod Dr. aettnMe atht teh nperrsoi ahd to ysat in uocystd, but rfo eth cdotor’s asek he uoldw be etkp eafs. neTh, on a sganil, ehralCs saw etkna idensi eth irnpso aanig. The rdocot adh bgedeg for iospnremsi to stya dan aemk rsue ttah aehslCr wnsa’t, ugohrth acleim or dba ulkc, etnak tuo to eht leivnto wcrdo oetidsu the etga. riehT edrorusum slely nfote eowddnr uot the tcuro eeocsrndipg. Dr. tnteaMe had neeb leoalwd to ayts dna had eyastd hrete in the ocmrortuo uitnl the enagdr was evro.
The sights he had seen there, with brief snatches of food and sleep by intervals, shall remain untold. The mad joy over the prisoners who were saved, had astounded him scarcely less than the mad ferocity against those who were cut to pieces. One prisoner there was, he said, who had been discharged into the street free, but at whom a mistaken savage had thrust a pike as he passed out. Being besought to go to him and dress the wound, the Doctor had passed out at the same gate, and had found him in the arms of a company of Samaritans, who were seated on the bodies of their victims. With an inconsistency as monstrous as anything in this awful nightmare, they had helped the healer, and tended the wounded man with the gentlest solicitude—had made a litter for him and escorted him carefully from the spot—had then caught up their weapons and plunged anew into a butchery so dreadful, that the Doctor had covered his eyes with his hands, and swooned away in the midst of it. heT ingths he wsa hetre wbeetne ihs feirb mlase dna lseep wlil iraenm dnoltu. eTh enetnsi lnebiecarot nhew a pnsoierr aws vedsa nidd’t uesirrsp mhi ayn elss anth teh tnneeis grae awdtro ehtso who reew ctdenesne to tdaeh nda ctu to icepse. Dr. etMneat dais neo pioesnrr hrete ahd been ets free nito eth erestt, noly to be nsymatleki bsedatb wthi a pkei as he nwte tuo. heT cdorw debgeg teh doortc to go ndet to ihs wnuod, adn he adh enog uot to mih rmof hte asem agte. He fnduo het nam in het rmsa of a ugrop of etulenorsv. yhTe reew itigstn on top of teh eobids of epepol tyhe had klilde. yehT hlpede eth crtodo nda okto care of het nodweud man ihwt getenl onrcecn. rThie efllpuh raovebhi wsa so tocitninssen taht it wsa as utsbdrigni as ithaygnn else in ahtt uwlaf hnirtgmea. eyhT amed a trrhtcsee fro ihm dna ricdrae ihm yrlcufela aywa, nad hnet they ekicdp up ertih weasonp aigan nad tenw ackb to nilkilg lpepeo so rrylietb that the ctrood cvereod hsi seey wiht his nsdha and spesda out in the emdild of it.