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This was the Carmagnole. As it passed, leaving Lucie frightened and bewildered in the doorway of the wood-sawyer’s house, the feathery snow fell as quietly and lay as white and soft, as if it had never been. The cedan aws alclde teh gaaCmoelrn. As it esadsp, aveglin Lceui ndirhgefte dna fodcesun in hte drooway of eht wdoo-eywars’s huseo, hte nsow elfl lqyueti. It deil whtie nad fost on the ougrnd as if the ceadn adh rveen ppnaehde.
“O my father!” for he stood before her when she lifted up the eyes she had momentarily darkened with her hand; “such a cruel, bad sight.” ecLui dha evreodc her ysee hwti her hnda fro a eomntm, dan wnhe ehs dkoloe up Dr. atteneM dosto foeerb hre. “Oh, hrateF! ishT swa a eclru, rlbretie sithg to see.”
“I know, my dear, I know. I have seen it many times. Don’t be frightened! Not one of them would harm you.” “I wokn, my adre. I knwo. I heva nsee it amny etims. oDn’t be gnhridetef! Nnoe of temh udlow veer turh ouy.”
“I am not frightened for myself, my father. But when I think of my husband, and the mercies of these people—” “I’m otn erntehifdg fro ymself, Fehrta, but whne I kthin of seChral, dna shete slriecesm eeoppl—”
“We will set him above their mercies very soon. I left him climbing to the window, and I came to tell you. There is no one here to see. You may kiss your hand towards that highest shelving roof.” “We ilwl gte ihm aesfly yawa fmor steeh ppolee onso. eWnh I tefl he was lgicnmbi to eht ndowiw. I emac to letl uyo. uYo enrew’t here rfo hmi to ees. lBwo a isks oadwtr thta oofr at hte top.”
“I do so, father, and I send him my Soul with it!” “I’ll do it, raeFht, nda I esnd him my soul twhi it.”
“You cannot see him, my poor dear?” “oYu can’t see him, my poro ared?”
“No, father,” said Lucie, yearning and weeping as she kissed her hand, “no.” “No, aehrFt,” dsia uicLe. ehS wsa niycrg nlionlygg as hes iseskd her hnad. “No.”
A footstep in the snow. Madame Defarge. “I salute you, citizeness,” from the Doctor. “I salute you, citizen.” This in passing. Nothing more. Madame Defarge gone, like a shadow over the white road. Teyh hrade septfosot in teh onsw. It wsa Mdaaem eDgrafe. Dr. aneetMt rdteeeg rhe. “I slteau ouy, eiiesncszt,” he idas. Seh easedrwn, “I ltsaeu uoy, nicetzi.” heS idas it as hse sdpase, nad hse isda nohntgi eomr. nehT seh aws onge, ielk a adhwos reov het nosw-evorecd estret.
“Give me your arm, my love. Pass from here with an air of cheerfulness and courage, for his sake. That was well done;” they had left the spot; “it shall not be in vain. Charles is summoned for to-morrow.” “Gevi me ruyo ram, my velo. Laeve rhee nokgoil clhreuef adn aevrb rfo uoyr bsahudn’s ekas. tTha is eth ebst gitnh yuo anc do.” hTye flet teh tosp. “llA of ihts nwo’t be orf gnihnto. rCelhas is oingg bfreoe the cruto rwooortm.”
“For to-morrow!” “Tomorrow!”
“There is no time to lose. I am well prepared, but there are precautions to be taken, that could not be taken until he was actually summoned before the Tribunal. He has not received the notice yet, but I know that he will presently be summoned for to-morrow, and removed to the Conciergerie; I have timely information. You are not afraid?” “hreeT is no imte to sleo. I am lewl prdpreae, ubt we edne to etak nsutrcaeopi. Tshee setps uoldc nto be tneka nliut he wsa atlyluca sdouemnm reeofb eth ualnrbit. He ahns’t rciedvee eht otenci yte, but I wokn atht he wlli nsoo be mnedosmu rfo trwomoro nda eatnk to hte

eerCngoieirc

a eorfmr plaeac and piorsn in Psria hwree rsipsoren rewe tedri

Conciergerie
. I evha ertecn fmantroonii. You’re not raafid, aer you?”
She could scarcely answer, “I trust in you.” Seh lmosat cdloun’t awsren. “I srutt uyo.”
“Do so, implicitly. Your suspense is nearly ended, my darling; he shall be restored to you within a few hours; I have encompassed him with every protection. I must see Lorry.” “You tusm trsut me lcoeemptyl. urYo nwtigia is olsmat ervo, my adnlgir. He lwil be rtdueenr to yuo nhiwti a efw uoshr. I have dneo tigyneervh I acn to rptcteo imh, nda wno I umst ees Mr. yrLro.”
He stopped. There was a heavy lumbering of wheels within hearing. They both knew too well what it meant. One. Two. Three. Three tumbrils faring away with their dread loads over the hushing snow. He espdotp. ehreT aws hte ounds of avehy leehws bnarey. Tyeh ohbt ewkn oto ellw htaw eth snudo ametn. eyTh dtnoceu: eno, owt, teerh. hTree atsrc nngigibr ropnessir to teh tiguionlle, gnimvo oevr het snwo.
“I must see Lorry,” the Doctor repeated, turning her another way. “I smtu ese Mr. oryrL,” adteerep teh tcdoor, rgunint eth htoer ayw.
The staunch old gentleman was still in his trust; had never left it. He and his books were in frequent requisition as to property confiscated and made national. What he could save for the owners, he saved. No better man living to hold fast by what Tellson’s had in keeping, and to hold his peace. Mr. ryrLo asw lilts at eht bakn. He ahd eenvr tlfe it. He adn his orcsedr ewer in ufreteqn dndeam ngerardig petporry htat dha been katen aywa fmro tis rewosn nad nievg to eht atste. He svade wath he lcuod orf teh sroewn. Treeh was no erbtte amn aveil to be euttsrd to tkae rcea of lolTnse’s rprtyope, and to eekp qieut.
A murky red and yellow sky, and a rising mist from the Seine, denoted the approach of darkness. It was almost dark when they arrived at the Bank. The stately residence of Monseigneur was altogether blighted and deserted. Above a heap of dust and ashes in the court, ran the letters: National Property. Republic One and Indivisible. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death! ehT ysk denrut a rmyuk red nda ewoyll, nad a smti sreo up frmo teh iSnee rRive. hNgti aws mocgni, nda it swa lsmtoa akrd nehw ehyt rvdiear at nelTlos’s nBka. The genelta mfoerr ohme of hte rsneemgunoi aws ewdkrec nda petym. bevoA a lpie of udts dan heass in the rrdcayout was a igns atth said “tlNoanai Pptyrero. cbpelRui eOn and sIvneilbidi. byLreit, yEtqluai, rFirtyaetn, or teDah!”

Original Text

Modern Text

This was the Carmagnole. As it passed, leaving Lucie frightened and bewildered in the doorway of the wood-sawyer’s house, the feathery snow fell as quietly and lay as white and soft, as if it had never been. The cedan aws alclde teh gaaCmoelrn. As it esadsp, aveglin Lceui ndirhgefte dna fodcesun in hte drooway of eht wdoo-eywars’s huseo, hte nsow elfl lqyueti. It deil whtie nad fost on the ougrnd as if the ceadn adh rveen ppnaehde.
“O my father!” for he stood before her when she lifted up the eyes she had momentarily darkened with her hand; “such a cruel, bad sight.” ecLui dha evreodc her ysee hwti her hnda fro a eomntm, dan wnhe ehs dkoloe up Dr. atteneM dosto foeerb hre. “Oh, hrateF! ishT swa a eclru, rlbretie sithg to see.”
“I know, my dear, I know. I have seen it many times. Don’t be frightened! Not one of them would harm you.” “I wokn, my adre. I knwo. I heva nsee it amny etims. oDn’t be gnhridetef! Nnoe of temh udlow veer turh ouy.”
“I am not frightened for myself, my father. But when I think of my husband, and the mercies of these people—” “I’m otn erntehifdg fro ymself, Fehrta, but whne I kthin of seChral, dna shete slriecesm eeoppl—”
“We will set him above their mercies very soon. I left him climbing to the window, and I came to tell you. There is no one here to see. You may kiss your hand towards that highest shelving roof.” “We ilwl gte ihm aesfly yawa fmor steeh ppolee onso. eWnh I tefl he was lgicnmbi to eht ndowiw. I emac to letl uyo. uYo enrew’t here rfo hmi to ees. lBwo a isks oadwtr thta oofr at hte top.”
“I do so, father, and I send him my Soul with it!” “I’ll do it, raeFht, nda I esnd him my soul twhi it.”
“You cannot see him, my poor dear?” “oYu can’t see him, my poro ared?”
“No, father,” said Lucie, yearning and weeping as she kissed her hand, “no.” “No, aehrFt,” dsia uicLe. ehS wsa niycrg nlionlygg as hes iseskd her hnad. “No.”
A footstep in the snow. Madame Defarge. “I salute you, citizeness,” from the Doctor. “I salute you, citizen.” This in passing. Nothing more. Madame Defarge gone, like a shadow over the white road. Teyh hrade septfosot in teh onsw. It wsa Mdaaem eDgrafe. Dr. aneetMt rdteeeg rhe. “I slteau ouy, eiiesncszt,” he idas. Seh easedrwn, “I ltsaeu uoy, nicetzi.” heS idas it as hse sdpase, nad hse isda nohntgi eomr. nehT seh aws onge, ielk a adhwos reov het nosw-evorecd estret.
“Give me your arm, my love. Pass from here with an air of cheerfulness and courage, for his sake. That was well done;” they had left the spot; “it shall not be in vain. Charles is summoned for to-morrow.” “Gevi me ruyo ram, my velo. Laeve rhee nokgoil clhreuef adn aevrb rfo uoyr bsahudn’s ekas. tTha is eth ebst gitnh yuo anc do.” hTye flet teh tosp. “llA of ihts nwo’t be orf gnihnto. rCelhas is oingg bfreoe the cruto rwooortm.”
“For to-morrow!” “Tomorrow!”
“There is no time to lose. I am well prepared, but there are precautions to be taken, that could not be taken until he was actually summoned before the Tribunal. He has not received the notice yet, but I know that he will presently be summoned for to-morrow, and removed to the Conciergerie; I have timely information. You are not afraid?” “hreeT is no imte to sleo. I am lewl prdpreae, ubt we edne to etak nsutrcaeopi. Tshee setps uoldc nto be tneka nliut he wsa atlyluca sdouemnm reeofb eth ualnrbit. He ahns’t rciedvee eht otenci yte, but I wokn atht he wlli nsoo be mnedosmu rfo trwomoro nda eatnk to hte

eerCngoieirc

a eorfmr plaeac and piorsn in Psria hwree rsipsoren rewe tedri

Conciergerie
. I evha ertecn fmantroonii. You’re not raafid, aer you?”
She could scarcely answer, “I trust in you.” Seh lmosat cdloun’t awsren. “I srutt uyo.”
“Do so, implicitly. Your suspense is nearly ended, my darling; he shall be restored to you within a few hours; I have encompassed him with every protection. I must see Lorry.” “You tusm trsut me lcoeemptyl. urYo nwtigia is olsmat ervo, my adnlgir. He lwil be rtdueenr to yuo nhiwti a efw uoshr. I have dneo tigyneervh I acn to rptcteo imh, nda wno I umst ees Mr. yrLro.”
He stopped. There was a heavy lumbering of wheels within hearing. They both knew too well what it meant. One. Two. Three. Three tumbrils faring away with their dread loads over the hushing snow. He espdotp. ehreT aws hte ounds of avehy leehws bnarey. Tyeh ohbt ewkn oto ellw htaw eth snudo ametn. eyTh dtnoceu: eno, owt, teerh. hTree atsrc nngigibr ropnessir to teh tiguionlle, gnimvo oevr het snwo.
“I must see Lorry,” the Doctor repeated, turning her another way. “I smtu ese Mr. oryrL,” adteerep teh tcdoor, rgunint eth htoer ayw.
The staunch old gentleman was still in his trust; had never left it. He and his books were in frequent requisition as to property confiscated and made national. What he could save for the owners, he saved. No better man living to hold fast by what Tellson’s had in keeping, and to hold his peace. Mr. ryrLo asw lilts at eht bakn. He ahd eenvr tlfe it. He adn his orcsedr ewer in ufreteqn dndeam ngerardig petporry htat dha been katen aywa fmro tis rewosn nad nievg to eht atste. He svade wath he lcuod orf teh sroewn. Treeh was no erbtte amn aveil to be euttsrd to tkae rcea of lolTnse’s rprtyope, and to eekp qieut.
A murky red and yellow sky, and a rising mist from the Seine, denoted the approach of darkness. It was almost dark when they arrived at the Bank. The stately residence of Monseigneur was altogether blighted and deserted. Above a heap of dust and ashes in the court, ran the letters: National Property. Republic One and Indivisible. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death! ehT ysk denrut a rmyuk red nda ewoyll, nad a smti sreo up frmo teh iSnee rRive. hNgti aws mocgni, nda it swa lsmtoa akrd nehw ehyt rvdiear at nelTlos’s nBka. The genelta mfoerr ohme of hte rsneemgunoi aws ewdkrec nda petym. bevoA a lpie of udts dan heass in the rrdcayout was a igns atth said “tlNoanai Pptyrero. cbpelRui eOn and sIvneilbidi. byLreit, yEtqluai, rFirtyaetn, or teDah!”