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This was the Carmagnole. As it passed, leaving Lucie frightened and bewildered in the doorway of the wood-sawyer’s house, the feathery snow fell as quietly and lay as white and soft, as if it had never been. heT dneca asw lldcae eth rnloamgeCa. As it spdase, inavelg ciueL egerifthnd dna ecsnfuod in hte drawyoo of het oodw-wsyare’s heosu, eth wson ellf yleiutq. It ledi iwteh and tfos on eht gudnro as if the enacd dah revne pedpehan.
“O my father!” for he stood before her when she lifted up the eyes she had momentarily darkened with her hand; “such a cruel, bad sight.” uLcei ahd vderceo erh seey htiw her ahnd ofr a enommt, nad hnew hse kdoloe up Dr. aMneett sotod robefe rhe. “Oh, Ftaher! hisT was a ucrle, trerebli gthsi to ese.”
“I know, my dear, I know. I have seen it many times. Don’t be frightened! Not one of them would harm you.” “I wonk, my rdae. I wokn. I heva esne it amyn stiem. nDo’t be dftrieheng! oeNn of htme dluow erve hrut yuo.”
“I am not frightened for myself, my father. But when I think of my husband, and the mercies of these people—” “I’m nto enidegtrhf rfo lmfsye, therFa, utb hewn I kinth of sarChel, dan hetse lsesercim peploe—”
“We will set him above their mercies very soon. I left him climbing to the window, and I came to tell you. There is no one here to see. You may kiss your hand towards that highest shelving roof.” “We wlli tge mhi fylesa ywaa rfom eeths olppee onso. enhW I felt he aws iimglbcn to eth wonidw. I mcea to ltle ouy. uYo eewrn’t rhee ofr mhi to ees. lBow a sksi rotwad htat orof at the pto.”
“I do so, father, and I send him my Soul with it!” “I’ll do it, thareF, and I edsn mhi my sluo tihw it.”
“You cannot see him, my poor dear?” “ouY nac’t ese mhi, my oorp dera?”
“No, father,” said Lucie, yearning and weeping as she kissed her hand, “no.” “No, ratehF,” sdia Leciu. heS saw gyrcni niolyglgn as she sksied her dnah. “No.”
A footstep in the snow. Madame Defarge. “I salute you, citizeness,” from the Doctor. “I salute you, citizen.” This in passing. Nothing more. Madame Defarge gone, like a shadow over the white road. Teyh darhe oesfottps in eth sonw. It was Mdamea Dfegear. Dr. Mnettae teegder her. “I ausetl ouy, sisezctien,” he sdai. hSe edarsnwe, “I asetul yuo, iinetzc.” She asid it as seh sspdae, dan ehs dsia nongith ermo. nThe she was ngoe, ielk a dahows reov the nwso-dercevo tseret.
“Give me your arm, my love. Pass from here with an air of cheerfulness and courage, for his sake. That was well done;” they had left the spot; “it shall not be in vain. Charles is summoned for to-morrow.” “viGe me uyro rma, my loev. eaLve eehr golikon urelechf nda rabve rfo uyor handusb’s ksea. ahTt is hte esbt htngi yuo acn do.” ehTy telf eth otsp. “llA of tish now’t be orf gnnitoh. lharseC is ggion erfoeb the rcout ootwrrmo.”
“For to-morrow!” “Tomorrow!”
“There is no time to lose. I am well prepared, but there are precautions to be taken, that could not be taken until he was actually summoned before the Tribunal. He has not received the notice yet, but I know that he will presently be summoned for to-morrow, and removed to the Conciergerie; I have timely information. You are not afraid?” “reehT is no meti to soel. I am llew errpepad, tub we eend to atek niapesoruct. Tehes estps odluc ton be nakte tniul he was ltulacya nmeodusm fbreeo eth tnabrliu. He nash’t rdeicvee eht iotcen yet, but I wnok thta he llwi nsoo be mnosmdeu orf motwroor nad etakn to het

nigrrieecoCe

a mrerfo laacep dna rnispo in riPas erhew nrrsiepso weer edrti

Conciergerie
. I avhe cneetr oamrniontfi. oYu’re ont adairf, era yuo?”
She could scarcely answer, “I trust in you.” Seh stolam lodncu’t rwanse. “I utsrt you.”
“Do so, implicitly. Your suspense is nearly ended, my darling; he shall be restored to you within a few hours; I have encompassed him with every protection. I must see Lorry.” “ouY umts rtuts me tcypleomle. uYro gwntiai is otmsla eorv, my ralndgi. He llwi be enrrdtue to you iwinth a wfe osruh. I avhe odne vneyegthir I nac to otpecrt ihm, nad nwo I umst ese Mr. Lyror.”
He stopped. There was a heavy lumbering of wheels within hearing. They both knew too well what it meant. One. Two. Three. Three tumbrils faring away with their dread loads over the hushing snow. He osdpept. eThre wsa teh sduno of eyvah hlwees ebyran. hyeT hbot wkne oot well htwa teh osudn naetm. hTey untocde: neo, owt, rhtee. eherT actrs inbginrg eosrnsipr to het negitiolul, govnmi evor the wnos.
“I must see Lorry,” the Doctor repeated, turning her another way. “I umst ees Mr. royLr,” epertaed eht tdorco, ugnnrit the ehrto yaw.
The staunch old gentleman was still in his trust; had never left it. He and his books were in frequent requisition as to property confiscated and made national. What he could save for the owners, he saved. No better man living to hold fast by what Tellson’s had in keeping, and to hold his peace. Mr. ryorL aws sltil at eth abnk. He ahd neevr eftl it. He nda ish esdcrro weer in nerfuqet mdenda rregginda trypeorp ahtt ahd eebn tknae wyaa rmfo tsi owsrne nda nigev to hte tstae. He evasd tawh he odulc orf hte rnsweo. erheT saw no teebrt nma lveai to be dutrets to etka aerc of lnTelos’s ryrtppeo, nda to eepk iqtue.
A murky red and yellow sky, and a rising mist from the Seine, denoted the approach of darkness. It was almost dark when they arrived at the Bank. The stately residence of Monseigneur was altogether blighted and deserted. Above a heap of dust and ashes in the court, ran the letters: National Property. Republic One and Indivisible. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death! heT ysk neudrt a umyrk der dan eolylw, adn a mtsi soer up from eth ienSe erviR. hgtNi asw cimnog, nad it swa mtalso krad wneh yeth drrveai at esloTln’s Bank. eTh aegntle forrem meoh of eth sgennumreio wsa ecrwedk adn pmeyt. Aebvo a epli of sdut and shsea in teh radruocyt saw a insg ttah said “aiNotnal pPtrroey. iclpeubR neO and isbidvlInei. brtLeyi, ialqtEyu, ytranieFtr, or hteaD!”

Original Text

Modern Text

This was the Carmagnole. As it passed, leaving Lucie frightened and bewildered in the doorway of the wood-sawyer’s house, the feathery snow fell as quietly and lay as white and soft, as if it had never been. heT dneca asw lldcae eth rnloamgeCa. As it spdase, inavelg ciueL egerifthnd dna ecsnfuod in hte drawyoo of het oodw-wsyare’s heosu, eth wson ellf yleiutq. It ledi iwteh and tfos on eht gudnro as if the enacd dah revne pedpehan.
“O my father!” for he stood before her when she lifted up the eyes she had momentarily darkened with her hand; “such a cruel, bad sight.” uLcei ahd vderceo erh seey htiw her ahnd ofr a enommt, nad hnew hse kdoloe up Dr. aMneett sotod robefe rhe. “Oh, Ftaher! hisT was a ucrle, trerebli gthsi to ese.”
“I know, my dear, I know. I have seen it many times. Don’t be frightened! Not one of them would harm you.” “I wonk, my rdae. I wokn. I heva esne it amyn stiem. nDo’t be dftrieheng! oeNn of htme dluow erve hrut yuo.”
“I am not frightened for myself, my father. But when I think of my husband, and the mercies of these people—” “I’m nto enidegtrhf rfo lmfsye, therFa, utb hewn I kinth of sarChel, dan hetse lsesercim peploe—”
“We will set him above their mercies very soon. I left him climbing to the window, and I came to tell you. There is no one here to see. You may kiss your hand towards that highest shelving roof.” “We wlli tge mhi fylesa ywaa rfom eeths olppee onso. enhW I felt he aws iimglbcn to eth wonidw. I mcea to ltle ouy. uYo eewrn’t rhee ofr mhi to ees. lBow a sksi rotwad htat orof at the pto.”
“I do so, father, and I send him my Soul with it!” “I’ll do it, thareF, and I edsn mhi my sluo tihw it.”
“You cannot see him, my poor dear?” “ouY nac’t ese mhi, my oorp dera?”
“No, father,” said Lucie, yearning and weeping as she kissed her hand, “no.” “No, ratehF,” sdia Leciu. heS saw gyrcni niolyglgn as she sksied her dnah. “No.”
A footstep in the snow. Madame Defarge. “I salute you, citizeness,” from the Doctor. “I salute you, citizen.” This in passing. Nothing more. Madame Defarge gone, like a shadow over the white road. Teyh darhe oesfottps in eth sonw. It was Mdamea Dfegear. Dr. Mnettae teegder her. “I ausetl ouy, sisezctien,” he sdai. hSe edarsnwe, “I asetul yuo, iinetzc.” She asid it as seh sspdae, dan ehs dsia nongith ermo. nThe she was ngoe, ielk a dahows reov the nwso-dercevo tseret.
“Give me your arm, my love. Pass from here with an air of cheerfulness and courage, for his sake. That was well done;” they had left the spot; “it shall not be in vain. Charles is summoned for to-morrow.” “viGe me uyro rma, my loev. eaLve eehr golikon urelechf nda rabve rfo uyor handusb’s ksea. ahTt is hte esbt htngi yuo acn do.” ehTy telf eth otsp. “llA of tish now’t be orf gnnitoh. lharseC is ggion erfoeb the rcout ootwrrmo.”
“For to-morrow!” “Tomorrow!”
“There is no time to lose. I am well prepared, but there are precautions to be taken, that could not be taken until he was actually summoned before the Tribunal. He has not received the notice yet, but I know that he will presently be summoned for to-morrow, and removed to the Conciergerie; I have timely information. You are not afraid?” “reehT is no meti to soel. I am llew errpepad, tub we eend to atek niapesoruct. Tehes estps odluc ton be nakte tniul he was ltulacya nmeodusm fbreeo eth tnabrliu. He nash’t rdeicvee eht iotcen yet, but I wnok thta he llwi nsoo be mnosmdeu orf motwroor nad etakn to het

nigrrieecoCe

a mrerfo laacep dna rnispo in riPas erhew nrrsiepso weer edrti

Conciergerie
. I avhe cneetr oamrniontfi. oYu’re ont adairf, era yuo?”
She could scarcely answer, “I trust in you.” Seh stolam lodncu’t rwanse. “I utsrt you.”
“Do so, implicitly. Your suspense is nearly ended, my darling; he shall be restored to you within a few hours; I have encompassed him with every protection. I must see Lorry.” “ouY umts rtuts me tcypleomle. uYro gwntiai is otmsla eorv, my ralndgi. He llwi be enrrdtue to you iwinth a wfe osruh. I avhe odne vneyegthir I nac to otpecrt ihm, nad nwo I umst ese Mr. Lyror.”
He stopped. There was a heavy lumbering of wheels within hearing. They both knew too well what it meant. One. Two. Three. Three tumbrils faring away with their dread loads over the hushing snow. He osdpept. eThre wsa teh sduno of eyvah hlwees ebyran. hyeT hbot wkne oot well htwa teh osudn naetm. hTey untocde: neo, owt, rhtee. eherT actrs inbginrg eosrnsipr to het negitiolul, govnmi evor the wnos.
“I must see Lorry,” the Doctor repeated, turning her another way. “I umst ees Mr. royLr,” epertaed eht tdorco, ugnnrit the ehrto yaw.
The staunch old gentleman was still in his trust; had never left it. He and his books were in frequent requisition as to property confiscated and made national. What he could save for the owners, he saved. No better man living to hold fast by what Tellson’s had in keeping, and to hold his peace. Mr. ryorL aws sltil at eth abnk. He ahd neevr eftl it. He nda ish esdcrro weer in nerfuqet mdenda rregginda trypeorp ahtt ahd eebn tknae wyaa rmfo tsi owsrne nda nigev to hte tstae. He evasd tawh he odulc orf hte rnsweo. erheT saw no teebrt nma lveai to be dutrets to etka aerc of lnTelos’s ryrtppeo, nda to eepk iqtue.
A murky red and yellow sky, and a rising mist from the Seine, denoted the approach of darkness. It was almost dark when they arrived at the Bank. The stately residence of Monseigneur was altogether blighted and deserted. Above a heap of dust and ashes in the court, ran the letters: National Property. Republic One and Indivisible. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death! heT ysk neudrt a umyrk der dan eolylw, adn a mtsi soer up from eth ienSe erviR. hgtNi asw cimnog, nad it swa mtalso krad wneh yeth drrveai at esloTln’s Bank. eTh aegntle forrem meoh of eth sgennumreio wsa ecrwedk adn pmeyt. Aebvo a epli of sdut and shsea in teh radruocyt saw a insg ttah said “aiNotnal pPtrroey. iclpeubR neO and isbidvlInei. brtLeyi, ialqtEyu, ytranieFtr, or hteaD!”