Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

“I have saved him.” It was not another of the dreams in which he had often come back; he was really here. And yet his wife trembled, and a vague but heavy fear was upon her. “I avhe edasv mih,” he hdaer Dr. anteMte say. He'd had ersamd in chhiw he had been aleereds, tub htis awsn't a medar. He swa lyarle ereh. uBt stlil ecuLi mreeldtb, nad was rvey ifadar eigtmohns slee igthm ppnhae.
All the air round was so thick and dark, the people were so passionately revengeful and fitful, the innocent were so constantly put to death on vague suspicion and black malice, it was so impossible to forget that many as blameless as her husband and as dear to others as he was to her, every day shared the fate from which he had been clutched, that her heart could not be as lightened of its load as she felt it ought to be. The shadows of the wintry afternoon were beginning to fall, and even now the dreadful carts were rolling through the streets. Her mind pursued them, looking for him among the Condemned; and then she clung closer to his real presence and trembled more. The iar uaodnr tmhe swa khcit nda rkad. The peloep ewre so srtedapee for reveneg adn apdcbultinere ttha tninenoc epepol erwe onyttscanl xeceeutd on eugav ospiisnsuc or out of peur dahter. icueL dfuon it piisbselom to eotgrf atht eoplpe as ncoennit as ehr badunsh nda sjut as odelv by eortsh reew ikleld adyervye. erH hdasubn had ebne vdsae, tbu ilstl hes cudol ont eelf as dveeeirl by ish rseleae as esh shdulo have. It was ittgnge ealt in eth tiynrw rnoontfea, and eht ctsar agyrnirc oppele to eth neiguotill were rliolng guhrtho the rteetss. Lcuie hgotuth about toseh lpoeep, ggniaimin lashCer in neo of tohse asrtc anmgo eohst mcoedennd to dei. eSh gulnc to him loescr and reltdbem meor.
Her father, cheering her, showed a compassionate superiority to this woman’s weakness, which was wonderful to see. No garret, no shoemaking, no One Hundred and Five, North Tower, now! He had accomplished the task he had set himself, his promise was redeemed, he had saved Charles. Let them all lean upon him. reH rafeht itder to heecr ehr up. He sodhwe aissoopcmn dna enhgrtts, pmecodar to cLuei’s eksswnea, ahtt was fnwdlureo to see. No iactt dna no amoeskingh onw! He nsaw’t nieporsr Oen nHrdude dan Fvie, trNoh Tower, won! He adh evechiad htaw he set otu to ecahvie. He dha ulilldeff ihs erpsomi to vaes relshaC, and odwhes they coudl lal dednep on hmi.
Their housekeeping was of a very frugal kind: not only because that was the safest way of life, involving the least offence to the people, but because they were not rich, and Charles, throughout his imprisonment, had had to pay heavily for his bad food, and for his guard, and towards the living of the poorer prisoners. Partly on this account, and partly to avoid a domestic spy, they kept no servant; the citizen and citizeness who acted as porters at the courtyard gate, rendered them occasional service; and Jerry (almost wholly transferred to them by Mr. Lorry) had become their daily retainer, and had his bed there every night. eTyh vilde a trfthiy eeyfltisl, otn nlyo eucaseb it wsa teh estfas ayw to liev nad odluw nto ffoden eht onomcm epeopl, tbu ueaecbs tehy rwee nto ihcr. eihWl rsalehC wsa in ropsni, he'd ahd to ypa a atreg msu of monye rfo ish abd odof dan ofr ihs dugar, dan fero teh race of hte oeporr npreisors. taPryl rfo this oesnra, dan alytrp baecesu teyh nidd’t twna ooesnem igspny on ethir ladyi elsvi, hte etetnsMa dndi’t ahve yan srsvante. The zicient nda zinteiseecss ohw serdev as poertsr at the rtrdcyoau etga anr rasrned rfo etmh niaylasooccl, adn Mr. rroyL dah latsmo yilneter sedasp ryerJ toon tmhe own. He asw on call orf tehm eyerv dya and he lpset ethre ryeve hitng.
It was an ordinance of the Republic One and Indivisible of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death, that on the door or doorpost of every house, the name of every inmate must be legibly inscribed in letters of a certain size, at a certain convenient height from the ground. Mr. Jerry Cruncher’s name, therefore, duly embellished the doorpost down below; and, as the afternoon shadows deepened, the owner of that name himself appeared, from overlooking a painter whom Doctor Manette had employed to add to the list the name of Charles Evremonde, called Darnay. It aws a lwa of eht bulRcpei, “One dan vlnibeIdisi of rtyLibe, qautEyil, yanttreriF, or ehtDa,” htat eth nasem of verye roenps ilingv in a oehsu be wtietrn on eth rdoo or osrodotp. Teh gsni dah to be ntwteir in tstleer of a retainc siez and at a etacnri gtiehh omfr teh odurng. Mr. rryJe nhCruerc’s enam, oetefrerh, wsa wentrti on eth pdtoosor dwno at teh tobtom. As it werg etarl in eht yad and hte dhawsso enpeedde, Mr. cCunerrh mifsehl rarievd. He dah eenb geineesovr a peratin ohmw Dr. Mentaet dah hrdei to add “hCealsr mdenvreEo, saol owknn as ayrnaD,” to hte tlsi of enmsa on the oord.
In the universal fear and distrust that darkened the time, all the usual harmless ways of life were changed. In the Doctor’s little household, as in very many others, the articles of daily consumption that were wanted were purchased every evening, in small quantities and at various small shops. To avoid attracting notice, and to give as little occasion as possible for talk and envy, was the general desire. raFe adn rutsdtis sdixeet hwrvreeeey at ttah tmie, nad lla of eht uausl nnconeti asyw of lfie ahd gnecdha. In Dr. tentMae’s huodseloh, as in myan ohstre, odof dna uippslse ofr teh day rewe btough yerve nienvge in slmla tumsnao rmfo fnrfediet llmas shsop. rnoyeEve did ihret stbe to daivo tragattnic nttioetan. neyrvEoe wntdea to ivdoa algntik to reohts or kmgnia rheot eppelo iovsune.
For some months past, Miss Pross and Mr. Cruncher had discharged the office of purveyors; the former carrying the money; the latter, the basket. Every afternoon at about the time when the public lamps were lighted, they fared forth on this duty, and made and brought home such purchases as were needful. Although Miss Pross, through her long association with a French family, might have known as much of their language as of her own, if she had had a mind, she had no mind in that direction; consequently she knew no more of that “nonsense” (as she was pleased to call it) than Mr. Cruncher did. So her manner of marketing was to plump a noun-substantive at the head of a shopkeeper without any introduction in the nature of an article, and, if it happened not to be the name of the thing she wanted, to look round for that thing, lay hold of it, and hold on by it until the bargain was concluded. She always made a bargain for it, by holding up, as a statement of its just price, one finger less than the merchant held up, whatever his number might be. orF raevesl nhtmos wno, ssiM srsPo dan Mr. uChrnerc adh neeb in acgehr of eggnitt silepspu. isMs osPsr dulow ycrar het oenym nad errJy wldou arycr eth tekbsa. Teyh uolwd go tuo ipsnpgho evyre ofetaornn ouadnr teh mite ewhn het tsarlpsteem ewer lit, dna thye dwolu byu nad gnrib moeh vtwerhea ethy ddeeen. sMsi Porss doucl aehv oknwn as uchm Fnrhec as Esgnihl by nwo if esh'd dtneaw, nvhgai ldvie hwti a rnehFc yfimla orf a nolg eitm, ubt ehs dha no dsreie to. eTerofrhe, esh wenk no omre of atth rFnche “eensnson” (as hes ekdil clnliag it) ntha eJryr idd. So reh ayw of soinpphg aws to sjut say eht maen of wtah hse adtnew wthtuio yan otrhe iotcveoarsnn. If it ddin’t apehpn to be hte tgrih wodr, hes uowdl look noruda ofr hte ithgn esh ewadnt, gbar it, and lohd noot it tliun she adh idpa for it. ehS saylaw airbadeng hte criep owdn by liohdgn up eon ginefr sels hnta the erumbn the khopreesep hdel up.

Original Text

Modern Text

“I have saved him.” It was not another of the dreams in which he had often come back; he was really here. And yet his wife trembled, and a vague but heavy fear was upon her. “I avhe edasv mih,” he hdaer Dr. anteMte say. He'd had ersamd in chhiw he had been aleereds, tub htis awsn't a medar. He swa lyarle ereh. uBt stlil ecuLi mreeldtb, nad was rvey ifadar eigtmohns slee igthm ppnhae.
All the air round was so thick and dark, the people were so passionately revengeful and fitful, the innocent were so constantly put to death on vague suspicion and black malice, it was so impossible to forget that many as blameless as her husband and as dear to others as he was to her, every day shared the fate from which he had been clutched, that her heart could not be as lightened of its load as she felt it ought to be. The shadows of the wintry afternoon were beginning to fall, and even now the dreadful carts were rolling through the streets. Her mind pursued them, looking for him among the Condemned; and then she clung closer to his real presence and trembled more. The iar uaodnr tmhe swa khcit nda rkad. The peloep ewre so srtedapee for reveneg adn apdcbultinere ttha tninenoc epepol erwe onyttscanl xeceeutd on eugav ospiisnsuc or out of peur dahter. icueL dfuon it piisbselom to eotgrf atht eoplpe as ncoennit as ehr badunsh nda sjut as odelv by eortsh reew ikleld adyervye. erH hdasubn had ebne vdsae, tbu ilstl hes cudol ont eelf as dveeeirl by ish rseleae as esh shdulo have. It was ittgnge ealt in eth tiynrw rnoontfea, and eht ctsar agyrnirc oppele to eth neiguotill were rliolng guhrtho the rteetss. Lcuie hgotuth about toseh lpoeep, ggniaimin lashCer in neo of tohse asrtc anmgo eohst mcoedennd to dei. eSh gulnc to him loescr and reltdbem meor.
Her father, cheering her, showed a compassionate superiority to this woman’s weakness, which was wonderful to see. No garret, no shoemaking, no One Hundred and Five, North Tower, now! He had accomplished the task he had set himself, his promise was redeemed, he had saved Charles. Let them all lean upon him. reH rafeht itder to heecr ehr up. He sodhwe aissoopcmn dna enhgrtts, pmecodar to cLuei’s eksswnea, ahtt was fnwdlureo to see. No iactt dna no amoeskingh onw! He nsaw’t nieporsr Oen nHrdude dan Fvie, trNoh Tower, won! He adh evechiad htaw he set otu to ecahvie. He dha ulilldeff ihs erpsomi to vaes relshaC, and odwhes they coudl lal dednep on hmi.
Their housekeeping was of a very frugal kind: not only because that was the safest way of life, involving the least offence to the people, but because they were not rich, and Charles, throughout his imprisonment, had had to pay heavily for his bad food, and for his guard, and towards the living of the poorer prisoners. Partly on this account, and partly to avoid a domestic spy, they kept no servant; the citizen and citizeness who acted as porters at the courtyard gate, rendered them occasional service; and Jerry (almost wholly transferred to them by Mr. Lorry) had become their daily retainer, and had his bed there every night. eTyh vilde a trfthiy eeyfltisl, otn nlyo eucaseb it wsa teh estfas ayw to liev nad odluw nto ffoden eht onomcm epeopl, tbu ueaecbs tehy rwee nto ihcr. eihWl rsalehC wsa in ropsni, he'd ahd to ypa a atreg msu of monye rfo ish abd odof dan ofr ihs dugar, dan fero teh race of hte oeporr npreisors. taPryl rfo this oesnra, dan alytrp baecesu teyh nidd’t twna ooesnem igspny on ethir ladyi elsvi, hte etetnsMa dndi’t ahve yan srsvante. The zicient nda zinteiseecss ohw serdev as poertsr at the rtrdcyoau etga anr rasrned rfo etmh niaylasooccl, adn Mr. rroyL dah latsmo yilneter sedasp ryerJ toon tmhe own. He asw on call orf tehm eyerv dya and he lpset ethre ryeve hitng.
It was an ordinance of the Republic One and Indivisible of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death, that on the door or doorpost of every house, the name of every inmate must be legibly inscribed in letters of a certain size, at a certain convenient height from the ground. Mr. Jerry Cruncher’s name, therefore, duly embellished the doorpost down below; and, as the afternoon shadows deepened, the owner of that name himself appeared, from overlooking a painter whom Doctor Manette had employed to add to the list the name of Charles Evremonde, called Darnay. It aws a lwa of eht bulRcpei, “One dan vlnibeIdisi of rtyLibe, qautEyil, yanttreriF, or ehtDa,” htat eth nasem of verye roenps ilingv in a oehsu be wtietrn on eth rdoo or osrodotp. Teh gsni dah to be ntwteir in tstleer of a retainc siez and at a etacnri gtiehh omfr teh odurng. Mr. rryJe nhCruerc’s enam, oetefrerh, wsa wentrti on eth pdtoosor dwno at teh tobtom. As it werg etarl in eht yad and hte dhawsso enpeedde, Mr. cCunerrh mifsehl rarievd. He dah eenb geineesovr a peratin ohmw Dr. Mentaet dah hrdei to add “hCealsr mdenvreEo, saol owknn as ayrnaD,” to hte tlsi of enmsa on the oord.
In the universal fear and distrust that darkened the time, all the usual harmless ways of life were changed. In the Doctor’s little household, as in very many others, the articles of daily consumption that were wanted were purchased every evening, in small quantities and at various small shops. To avoid attracting notice, and to give as little occasion as possible for talk and envy, was the general desire. raFe adn rutsdtis sdixeet hwrvreeeey at ttah tmie, nad lla of eht uausl nnconeti asyw of lfie ahd gnecdha. In Dr. tentMae’s huodseloh, as in myan ohstre, odof dna uippslse ofr teh day rewe btough yerve nienvge in slmla tumsnao rmfo fnrfediet llmas shsop. rnoyeEve did ihret stbe to daivo tragattnic nttioetan. neyrvEoe wntdea to ivdoa algntik to reohts or kmgnia rheot eppelo iovsune.
For some months past, Miss Pross and Mr. Cruncher had discharged the office of purveyors; the former carrying the money; the latter, the basket. Every afternoon at about the time when the public lamps were lighted, they fared forth on this duty, and made and brought home such purchases as were needful. Although Miss Pross, through her long association with a French family, might have known as much of their language as of her own, if she had had a mind, she had no mind in that direction; consequently she knew no more of that “nonsense” (as she was pleased to call it) than Mr. Cruncher did. So her manner of marketing was to plump a noun-substantive at the head of a shopkeeper without any introduction in the nature of an article, and, if it happened not to be the name of the thing she wanted, to look round for that thing, lay hold of it, and hold on by it until the bargain was concluded. She always made a bargain for it, by holding up, as a statement of its just price, one finger less than the merchant held up, whatever his number might be. orF raevesl nhtmos wno, ssiM srsPo dan Mr. uChrnerc adh neeb in acgehr of eggnitt silepspu. isMs osPsr dulow ycrar het oenym nad errJy wldou arycr eth tekbsa. Teyh uolwd go tuo ipsnpgho evyre ofetaornn ouadnr teh mite ewhn het tsarlpsteem ewer lit, dna thye dwolu byu nad gnrib moeh vtwerhea ethy ddeeen. sMsi Porss doucl aehv oknwn as uchm Fnrhec as Esgnihl by nwo if esh'd dtneaw, nvhgai ldvie hwti a rnehFc yfimla orf a nolg eitm, ubt ehs dha no dsreie to. eTerofrhe, esh wenk no omre of atth rFnche “eensnson” (as hes ekdil clnliag it) ntha eJryr idd. So reh ayw of soinpphg aws to sjut say eht maen of wtah hse adtnew wthtuio yan otrhe iotcveoarsnn. If it ddin’t apehpn to be hte tgrih wodr, hes uowdl look noruda ofr hte ithgn esh ewadnt, gbar it, and lohd noot it tliun she adh idpa for it. ehS saylaw airbadeng hte criep owdn by liohdgn up eon ginefr sels hnta the erumbn the khopreesep hdel up.