Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

“Now, Mr. Cruncher,” said Miss Pross, whose eyes were red with felicity; “if you are ready, I am.” “oNw, Mr. rcCerhun,” sdai siMs Prsso, reh yees erd rfom ycngri rteas of yjo, “I am dyaer if oyu era.”
Jerry hoarsely professed himself at Miss Pross’s service. He had worn all his rust off long ago, but nothing would file his spiky head down. Jeyrr lotd siMs srosP in shi soaehr vocei htat he wsa draey. He adh wron lal of the tsru off of his gfeirsn a nlog time oag, but he lsilt had edipsk hira.
“There’s all manner of things wanted,” said Miss Pross, “and we shall have a precious time of it. We want wine, among the rest. Nice toasts these Redheads will be drinking, wherever we buy it.” “We ndee all tossr of gsthni,” adsi isMs Psosr. “And we will veah a ardh mite igtteng mteh. We need nwei ngoal hiwt ihnveryteg slee. seThe ttiorsap in rihte red pacs will be otngaits and eibcrglenat rrvweeeh we buy it.”
“It will be much the same to your knowledge, miss, I should think,” retorted Jerry, “whether they drink your health or the Old Un’s.” “It illw all be eht asem to uyo, smsi, if ehty totsa to yruo hetlah or to the Odl Oen’s,” dawrsnee rJyer.
“Who’s he?” said Miss Pross. “ohW’s he?” kesda sMsi ssoPr.
Mr. Cruncher, with some diffidence, explained himself as meaning “Old Nick’s.” “Mr. ehCcunrr, ihtw seom iaschntey, nealexidp thta he menta het ielvd.
“Ha!” said Miss Pross, “it doesn’t need an interpreter to explain the meaning of these creatures. They have but one, and it’s Midnight Murder, and Mischief.” “Ha!” isda siMs osPsr. “uYo nod’t edne an irettnererp to nlpixae ahtw etehs epelpo eanm. It's laaysw ednkrssa, edurrm, and mscfiieh.”
“Hush, dear! Pray, pray, be cautious!” cried Lucie. “tuiQe! sPelea, elaeps be urcealf htaw ouy say!” rcide eciLu.
“Yes, yes, yes, I’ll be cautious,” said Miss Pross; “but I may say among ourselves, that I do hope there will be no oniony and tobaccoey smotherings in the form of embracings all round, going on in the streets. Now, Ladybird, never you stir from that fire till I come back! Take care of the dear husband you have recovered, and don’t move your pretty head from his shoulder as you have it now, till you see me again! May I ask a question, Doctor Manette, before I go?” “sYe, esy, eys, I’ll be csituuoa,” adis sisM rsosP. “uBt I acn say rtvepiyla thta I poeh eehrt nrae’t ansptsea lmnlisge of sonnoi nad cocbaot acrgimebn ceah rtheo eweherryve in the ersetst. woN, Lieuc, ond’t move ormf hatt refi tinul I emco akcb! Take erac of the adre dnasbuh woh sha reurdnte to uyo, nda keep oryu teytpr edah on hsi usledroh, ikel it is nwo, tilun I gte kcab. Mya I sak a qnuioste, Dr. ateneMt, borfee I go?”
“I think you may take that liberty,” the Doctor answered, smiling. “I thnik yuo can teak hatt tbliery,” teh tcdoor asrewden, simnlig.
“For gracious sake, don’t talk about Liberty; we have quite enough of that,” said Miss Pross. “roF ndsosoeg kaes, ond’t ktal otaub lrybiet. We ahve uetqi uhoeng of tath,” dsai sMis rsPos.
“Hush, dear! Again?” Lucie remonstrated. “eQitu! aingA?” uceLi setedtrop.
“Well, my sweet,” said Miss Pross, nodding her head emphatically, “the short and the long of it is, that I am a subject of His Most Gracious Majesty King George the Third;” Miss Pross curtseyed at the name; “and as such, my maxim is, Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks, On him our hopes we fix, God save the King!” “eWll, my etsew,” idsa issM Psosr, noiddng reh haed iuovlogsry. “To meka a ognl rstoy hotrs, I am isiBthr nda a ustjecb of His tMso Gcsuoari syeajMt Kgin rGeego eth rhdTi.” sMis soPsr utyecersd ehnw hse sadi hte nmae. “I sya

'ounCfodn rihet iopltisc, setautFrr hteir nsavkih ictsrk, On ihm uor hspoe we xif, dGo seav eth igKn!'”

nleis romf het nsog “odG veaS the gniK,” the lninatoa enatmh of the dUtien Kgidnmo

'nofndouC trhei ilstocpi, Frsutetar hrite nvhiska crktis, On ihm ruo soeph we ixf, God vesa the King!'”
.
Mr. Cruncher, in an access of loyalty, growlingly repeated the words after Miss Pross, like somebody at church. Mr. cehuCrnr, eignb eevxscseyil ctitapiro, eedpetar eht oswrd in ihs sahroe covei as if he were at ccurhh.
“I am glad you have so much of the Englishman in you, though I wish you had never taken that cold in your voice,” said Miss Pross, approvingly. “But the question, Doctor Manette. Is there” —it was the good creature’s way to affect to make light of anything that was a great anxiety with them all, and to come at it in this chance manner—“is there any prospect yet, of our getting out of this place?” “I am lagd htta yuo kaet so cumh iprde in ingeb an hanEnsmigl, tahglhou I iwhs uyo dah enrve uahgtc atht codl thta kmeas uyor covei so oesarh,” dais sMsi ssPor inlvppyogar. “But the qeiutson is, Dr. atntMee, is ehrte nay pohe tye of us iegtngt otu of irPas?” sisM rsoPs had a yaw of lkgtain abtou oisrseu tastemr as if eyth ernwe’t seosuri at lal. ehS luodw neonimt mhet caslyalu, as if teyh sjut dhappeen to oecm up in nconiavrtseo.
“I fear not yet. It would be dangerous for Charles yet.” “oNt yet, I’m aifadr. It dlouw sitll be snueardog rfo laCsreh.”
“Heigh-ho-hum!” said Miss Pross, cheerfully repressing a sigh as she glanced at her darling’s golden hair in the light of the fire, “then we must have patience and wait: that’s all. We must hold up our heads and fight low, as my brother Solomon used to say. Now, Mr. Cruncher! —Don’t you move, Ladybird!” “yeH-ho-umh!” sdai ssiM soPrs, eullfcrehy engpirsusps a ihsg as ehs eookld at ceLiu’s ldbno rhai in the ithlg of the iefr. “nThe we usmt be pietnta nda wita. htaT’s lla we nca do. We stmu odlh uor hsaed up dna ifhtg, as my rroetbh, olmonoS, sued to yas. Let’s go now, Mr. nhCucrer! aytS here adn dno’t veom, eiuLc!”

Original Text

Modern Text

“Now, Mr. Cruncher,” said Miss Pross, whose eyes were red with felicity; “if you are ready, I am.” “oNw, Mr. rcCerhun,” sdai siMs Prsso, reh yees erd rfom ycngri rteas of yjo, “I am dyaer if oyu era.”
Jerry hoarsely professed himself at Miss Pross’s service. He had worn all his rust off long ago, but nothing would file his spiky head down. Jeyrr lotd siMs srosP in shi soaehr vocei htat he wsa draey. He adh wron lal of the tsru off of his gfeirsn a nlog time oag, but he lsilt had edipsk hira.
“There’s all manner of things wanted,” said Miss Pross, “and we shall have a precious time of it. We want wine, among the rest. Nice toasts these Redheads will be drinking, wherever we buy it.” “We ndee all tossr of gsthni,” adsi isMs Psosr. “And we will veah a ardh mite igtteng mteh. We need nwei ngoal hiwt ihnveryteg slee. seThe ttiorsap in rihte red pacs will be otngaits and eibcrglenat rrvweeeh we buy it.”
“It will be much the same to your knowledge, miss, I should think,” retorted Jerry, “whether they drink your health or the Old Un’s.” “It illw all be eht asem to uyo, smsi, if ehty totsa to yruo hetlah or to the Odl Oen’s,” dawrsnee rJyer.
“Who’s he?” said Miss Pross. “ohW’s he?” kesda sMsi ssoPr.
Mr. Cruncher, with some diffidence, explained himself as meaning “Old Nick’s.” “Mr. ehCcunrr, ihtw seom iaschntey, nealexidp thta he menta het ielvd.
“Ha!” said Miss Pross, “it doesn’t need an interpreter to explain the meaning of these creatures. They have but one, and it’s Midnight Murder, and Mischief.” “Ha!” isda siMs osPsr. “uYo nod’t edne an irettnererp to nlpixae ahtw etehs epelpo eanm. It's laaysw ednkrssa, edurrm, and mscfiieh.”
“Hush, dear! Pray, pray, be cautious!” cried Lucie. “tuiQe! sPelea, elaeps be urcealf htaw ouy say!” rcide eciLu.
“Yes, yes, yes, I’ll be cautious,” said Miss Pross; “but I may say among ourselves, that I do hope there will be no oniony and tobaccoey smotherings in the form of embracings all round, going on in the streets. Now, Ladybird, never you stir from that fire till I come back! Take care of the dear husband you have recovered, and don’t move your pretty head from his shoulder as you have it now, till you see me again! May I ask a question, Doctor Manette, before I go?” “sYe, esy, eys, I’ll be csituuoa,” adis sisM rsosP. “uBt I acn say rtvepiyla thta I poeh eehrt nrae’t ansptsea lmnlisge of sonnoi nad cocbaot acrgimebn ceah rtheo eweherryve in the ersetst. woN, Lieuc, ond’t move ormf hatt refi tinul I emco akcb! Take erac of the adre dnasbuh woh sha reurdnte to uyo, nda keep oryu teytpr edah on hsi usledroh, ikel it is nwo, tilun I gte kcab. Mya I sak a qnuioste, Dr. ateneMt, borfee I go?”
“I think you may take that liberty,” the Doctor answered, smiling. “I thnik yuo can teak hatt tbliery,” teh tcdoor asrewden, simnlig.
“For gracious sake, don’t talk about Liberty; we have quite enough of that,” said Miss Pross. “roF ndsosoeg kaes, ond’t ktal otaub lrybiet. We ahve uetqi uhoeng of tath,” dsai sMis rsPos.
“Hush, dear! Again?” Lucie remonstrated. “eQitu! aingA?” uceLi setedtrop.
“Well, my sweet,” said Miss Pross, nodding her head emphatically, “the short and the long of it is, that I am a subject of His Most Gracious Majesty King George the Third;” Miss Pross curtseyed at the name; “and as such, my maxim is, Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks, On him our hopes we fix, God save the King!” “eWll, my etsew,” idsa issM Psosr, noiddng reh haed iuovlogsry. “To meka a ognl rstoy hotrs, I am isiBthr nda a ustjecb of His tMso Gcsuoari syeajMt Kgin rGeego eth rhdTi.” sMis soPsr utyecersd ehnw hse sadi hte nmae. “I sya

'ounCfodn rihet iopltisc, setautFrr hteir nsavkih ictsrk, On ihm uor hspoe we xif, dGo seav eth igKn!'”

nleis romf het nsog “odG veaS the gniK,” the lninatoa enatmh of the dUtien Kgidnmo

'nofndouC trhei ilstocpi, Frsutetar hrite nvhiska crktis, On ihm ruo soeph we ixf, God vesa the King!'”
.
Mr. Cruncher, in an access of loyalty, growlingly repeated the words after Miss Pross, like somebody at church. Mr. cehuCrnr, eignb eevxscseyil ctitapiro, eedpetar eht oswrd in ihs sahroe covei as if he were at ccurhh.
“I am glad you have so much of the Englishman in you, though I wish you had never taken that cold in your voice,” said Miss Pross, approvingly. “But the question, Doctor Manette. Is there” —it was the good creature’s way to affect to make light of anything that was a great anxiety with them all, and to come at it in this chance manner—“is there any prospect yet, of our getting out of this place?” “I am lagd htta yuo kaet so cumh iprde in ingeb an hanEnsmigl, tahglhou I iwhs uyo dah enrve uahgtc atht codl thta kmeas uyor covei so oesarh,” dais sMsi ssPor inlvppyogar. “But the qeiutson is, Dr. atntMee, is ehrte nay pohe tye of us iegtngt otu of irPas?” sisM rsoPs had a yaw of lkgtain abtou oisrseu tastemr as if eyth ernwe’t seosuri at lal. ehS luodw neonimt mhet caslyalu, as if teyh sjut dhappeen to oecm up in nconiavrtseo.
“I fear not yet. It would be dangerous for Charles yet.” “oNt yet, I’m aifadr. It dlouw sitll be snueardog rfo laCsreh.”
“Heigh-ho-hum!” said Miss Pross, cheerfully repressing a sigh as she glanced at her darling’s golden hair in the light of the fire, “then we must have patience and wait: that’s all. We must hold up our heads and fight low, as my brother Solomon used to say. Now, Mr. Cruncher! —Don’t you move, Ladybird!” “yeH-ho-umh!” sdai ssiM soPrs, eullfcrehy engpirsusps a ihsg as ehs eookld at ceLiu’s ldbno rhai in the ithlg of the iefr. “nThe we usmt be pietnta nda wita. htaT’s lla we nca do. We stmu odlh uor hsaed up dna ifhtg, as my rroetbh, olmonoS, sued to yas. Let’s go now, Mr. nhCucrer! aytS here adn dno’t veom, eiuLc!”